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Youtube Copyright Problems And Tech Video Question


Rain

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Unfortunately this wasn't planned ahead of time.   The deacons planned stuff last night and then I got volunteered to copy this video on to a flash drive - for tonight!   

 

They want to show Validation and then validate the kids.  

 

I have posted on the creator facebook page asking for permission just in case I need it, but if he doesn't get back in time do I need permission?  

 

If I am able to copy it then how do I do it? I've found you can convert youtube videos to flash drive with online sources.  Do you recommend any safe sites?

 

If I can't copy it for whatever reason then will they be able to play it directly from youtube?

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I've posted about that here on this website ( a number of non church videos are or at least were allowed when I was doing an activity years ago).  What I am asking is if this is copyrighted? And if it is ok to use this video, then how do I do it?

Edited by Rain
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I've posted about that here on this website ( a number of non church videos are or at least were allowed when I was doing an activity years ago).  What I am asking is if this is copyrighted? And if it is ok to use this video, then how do I do it?

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Since this video was professional produced I am going to say that this is copyrighted. You should get permission. IF you don't though, I am not sure anything could or would happen.

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This should answer your question from the Handbook of Instructions 2

 

 

Church members should strictly observe all copyright laws. Generally, only copyright owners may authorize duplication (copying), distribution, public performance, public display, or derivatives of their work. Using a work in any of these ways without authorization from the copyright owner is contrary to Church policy and may also subject the Church or the user to legal liability.

A user of a work should assume that it is protected by copyright. Published works usually include a copyright notice, such as “© 1959 by John Doe.” (For sound recordings, the symbol is ℗.) However, a copyright notice is not required for legal protection. Similarly, the fact that a publication is out of print does not nullify its copyright or justify duplicating, distributing, performing, displaying, or making derivatives of it without permission.

The Church’s Intellectual Property Office (IPO) assists in processing requests to use copyrighted Church materials or programs, including materials that are copyrighted by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. (IRI). IRI is a separate, nonprofit corporation that owns the intellectual property used by the Church. Additional information on requesting the use of Church-owned materials can be found by following the “Rights and Use Information” link on LDS.org.

The following questions and answers may help members understand and abide by copyright laws when using copyrighted materials at church and at home. If members have questions that are not answered in these guidelines, they may contact:

Intellectual Property Office
50 East North Temple Street, Room 1888
Salt Lake City, UT 84150-0018
Telephone: 1-801-240-3959 or 1-800-453-3860, extension 2-3959
Fax: 1-801-240-1187
E-mail: cor-intellectualproperty@ldschurch.org

Edited by cdowis
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Lawyer here, FWIW...

 

Any original work of authorship or creativity is protected by US copyright law, registered or not. Until the copyright expires (which in this case will likely be long after I have departed this vale of tears), it is generally up to the whim of the copyright holder whether or not to give you a license to "publish" the work. Publication would include things like showing it to a group of people during religious services. So yes, what you describe would probably have some sort of potentially painful intersection with U.S. copyright law. 

 

That being said, many copyright holders freely give permission to publish their works without royalty if the publication would be done during the course of bona fide religious services. Often times with sheet music this is printed right on the sheet music itself--and if it's not, sometimes all you have to do is ask nicely. But it can be a pain to track all of that stuff down, because sometimes it's difficult to discern exactly who needs to give permission, and even if you can you may have trouble reaching them.  And then sometimes they want a royalty (i.e., money). And sometimes they may even say no, which I have seen happen (once).

 

So, long story short, if I were you, I would not show a video to any collection of people outside of my home unless I knew that I had the appropriate permissions. Hope that helps.

 

Forgive me,

 

Jason

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