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I just finished an outstanding read; it is entitled "The Boys in the Boat" by Daniel James Brown.  

 

The book tells the story of how nine Americans from the Northwest win the gold in the eight man crew.  The chapters seem to fly by as I devoured each page; it was just riveting to me.  

 

At the beginning of each chapter is a quote from George Yeoman Pocock, an English boat builder that ended up at the University of Washington.  It is obvious that this unassuming man was a fount of wisdom in guiding both coaches and rowers alike.  Here is just one quote (found at the beginning of Chapter 19), "Where is the spiritual value of rowing? ...The losing of self entirely to the cooperative effort of the crew as a whole."  

 

If you are looking for a good book that gives a window into the Great Depression, the wholesome goodness of these young men and women of this era, overcoming the trials of life.  If you know anything about the University of Washington or Washington state you will find even more pleasure in reading it.

 

A tremendous read for old and young alike. 

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I love to read, but finding good books is always a challenge.

 

If you like historical non-fiction i bet you would enjoy Frozen in Time by Mitchell Zuckoff.  It's about the hunt and attempted recovery of some WWII planes/crew lost in Greenland during the 1940's.  It's very interesting and tells the story from two points of view-first from the point of view of the different wrecks and survivors as they happened during the war and from the airmen's points of view, and then from the point of view of these modern hunters who are using all their resources to attempt to find some of these wrecks (which are now hundreds of feet under ice due to the amount of snowfall Greenland get's every year) and finally bring the servicemen home to be buried by their loved ones.

 

I've also got some good recommendations for other non-fiction books dealing with the holocaust or America's interactions with South America during the cold war if anyone is interested in that topic.  They not happy reads, but still very interesting.

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I just finished an outstanding read; it is entitled "The Boys in the Boat" by Daniel James Brown.  

 

The book tells the story of how nine Americans from the Northwest win the gold in the eight man crew.  The chapters seem to fly by as I devoured each page; it was just riveting to me.  

 

At the beginning of each chapter is a quote from George Yeoman Pocock, an English boat builder that ended up at the University of Washington.  It is obvious that this unassuming man was a fount of wisdom in guiding both coaches and rowers alike.  Here is just one quote (found at the beginning of Chapter 19), "Where is the spiritual value of rowing? ...The losing of self entirely to the cooperative effort of the crew as a whole."  

 

If you are looking for a good book that gives a window into the Great Depression, the wholesome goodness of these young men and women of this era, overcoming the trials of life.  If you know anything about the University of Washington or Washington state you will find even more pleasure in reading it.

 

A tremendous read for old and young alike.

Killing Lincoln.
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Haha I was looking at the movie thread last night and thought it would be fun if we had a book thread too, and lo and behold!

 

I'm one who prefers fiction, specifically dystopia kind of stories. I just finished--and have started re-reading--The Darkest Minds series (Book 1: The Darkest Minds, book 2: Never Fade.  Book 3 isn't out yet) by Alexandria Bracken. I love the characters she created, the plot, love her writing style and creativity/originality. Book two does, however, have one particular character that swears often.  Bracken's characters (and situation they're in) feel really, though, so I didn't mind having the language in the book from.  It's odd to say, but if the characters had felt "cheep" and not fleshed out, the language would have been distracting and annoying to have.

 

Another series I really love is the Riyria Revelations, by Michael J Sullivan (fantasy genre). It follows several characters, but the two prominent ones are Hadrian and Royce, two men for hire that take jobs stealing valuables and/or providing cover ups/set ups of at the request of those willing to pay until one job end up being more than they can handle.  The overview of the plot is somewhat cliché, but there are so many twist and turns that it keeps you engaged. Plus, it's one of the only fantasy series where the women's propose is NOT to provide eye candy or parade around scantly clad. They're smart, and endearing, and have genuine purpose for being in the story. 

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That sounds like a good one Storm Rider, especially for someone born and still living in Washington State.

 

"Great" is probably different regarding most books that we only like. I haven't finished anything that should have a consensus as "great" since January. In June, I finished a history of the Arab, Islamic peoples that was really enjoyable to me. I know a little bit about the Christian and European side, and it was clear the author, Albert Hourani did too. It was very interesting to hear the Muslim side of taking over Anadalusia as well as their side of being pushed out of Spain. It was like that all over the book as Christian, Muslim, (and Jew) meet throughout the centuries. I thought all along the author was certainly Muslim. He certainly seemed to understand different nuances within Islam as well as many political and cultural influences by Islam upon the Arabs, and the Arabs upon Islam. 

 

I googled his name after finishing the book and was very surprised. Hourani's parents were Calvinists! Yes. They were originally from Lebanon and immigrated to England where they became Protestants (I think they were Eastern Rite while in Lebanon, don't know if in communion with Rome for sure). Hourani converted to Roman Catholicism as an adult and was widely recognized as an Arabic scholar. This seemed to be his last and greatest work, published in the early 90's. I wish he were around to comment about contemporary developments. The book is called simply A History of the Arab Peoples, from Harvard University Press.   

Edited by 3DOP
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Haha I was looking at the movie thread last night and thought it would be fun if we had a book thread too, and lo and behold!

 

I'm one who prefers fiction, specifically dystopia kind of stories. I just finished--and have started re-reading--The Darkest Minds series (Book 1: The Darkest Minds, book 2: Never Fade.  Book 3 isn't out yet) by Alexandria Bracken. I love the characters she created, the plot, love her writing style and creativity/originality. Book two does, however, have one particular character that swears often.  Bracken's characters (and situation they're in) feel really, though, so I didn't mind having the language in the book from.  It's odd to say, but if the characters had felt "cheep" and not fleshed out, the language would have been distracting and annoying to have.

 

Another series I really love is the Riyria Revelations, by Michael J Sullivan (fantasy genre). It follows several characters, but the two prominent ones are Hadrian and Royce, two men for hire that take jobs stealing valuables and/or providing cover ups/set ups of at the request of those willing to pay until one job end up being more than they can handle.  The overview of the plot is somewhat cliché, but there are so many twist and turns that it keeps you engaged. Plus, it's one of the only fantasy series where the women's propose is NOT to provide eye candy or parade around scantly clad. They're smart, and endearing, and have genuine purpose for being in the story. 

 

I like dystopia novels, but after the Hunger Games and all the copycats i can hardly handle the stuff anymore-especially YA.  The last one i read was the Maze Runner and after the first few chapters, i did not like it.

 

However, i'm reading a dystopia right now written by Stephen King that is actually pretty good.  It's called "Cell".  I have to warn you though that King loves the F-word.   It's not on every page or anything, but all his characters use it (which is why it's so annoying-it has nothing to do with character development).  Old, young, educated rich, poor and no education-chances are that if there is a character introduced he or she will use the F-word eventually.  It's stupid and always makes me wonder why King thinks everyone talks that way.

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That sounds like a good one Storm Rider, especially for someone born and still living in Washington State.

 

"Great" is probably different regarding most books that we only like. I haven't finished anything that should have a consensus as "great" since January. In June, I finished a history of the Arab, Islamic peoples that was really enjoyable to me. I know a little bit about the Christian and European side, and it was clear the author, Albert Hourani did too. It was very interesting to hear the Muslim side of taking over Anadalusia as well as their side of being pushed out of Spain. It was like that all over the book as Christian, Muslim, (and Jew) meet throughout the centuries. I thought all along the author was certainly Muslim. He certainly seemed to understand different nuances within Islam as well as many political and cultural influences by Islam upon the Arabs, and the Arabs upon Islam. 

 

I googled his name after finishing the book and was very surprised. Hourani's parents were Calvinists! Yes. They were originally from Lebanon and immigrated to England where they became Protestants (I think they were Eastern Rite while in Lebanon, don't know if in communion with Rome for sure). Hourani converted to Roman Catholicism as an adult and was widely recognized as an Arabic scholar. This seemed to be his last and greatest work, published in the early 90's. I wish he were around to comment about contemporary developments. The book is called simply A History of the Arab Peoples, from Harvard University Press.   

 

That was a good book also.  When you said his name I recognized him and thought he was Lebanese. I read that book a few years back and remember it well.  

 

The book I noted above was great because it was so uplifting and inspiring.  Honest, hard working lads that were fishermen, lumberjacks, and laborers that had never rowed and they win it all and stay friends.  

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I love to read, but finding good books is always a challenge.

 

If you like historical non-fiction i bet you would enjoy Frozen in Time by Mitchell Zuckoff.  It's about the hunt and attempted recovery of some WWII planes/crew lost in Greenland during the 1940's.  It's very interesting and tells the story from two points of view-first from the point of view of the different wrecks and survivors as they happened during the war and from the airmen's points of view, and then from the point of view of these modern hunters who are using all their resources to attempt to find some of these wrecks (which are now hundreds of feet under ice due to the amount of snowfall Greenland get's every year) and finally bring the servicemen home to be buried by their loved ones.

 

I've also got some good recommendations for other non-fiction books dealing with the holocaust or America's interactions with South America during the cold war if anyone is interested in that topic.  They not happy reads, but still very interesting.

 

That sounds like an excellent read.  I will get it.

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That was a good book also.  When you said his name I recognized him and thought he was Lebanese. I read that book a few years back and remember it well.  

 

The book I noted above was great because it was so uplifting and inspiring.  Honest, hard working lads that were fishermen, lumberjacks, and laborers that had never rowed and they win it all and stay friends.  

 

Give me a year or two Storm. I won't forget it.

 

Edit to say...years aren't a very long time. I kind of have a backlog.

Edited by 3DOP
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So...what books have you read twice or three times? That means you love the book.

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Besides the Bible, 66 Book truncated Protestant canon, I can only think of two books three times. The Bible has an advantage in that we who call ourselves Christian are somewhat obligated...even us  Catholics..."Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ"...that kind of stuff kind of motivates even Catholics who don't think Scripture alone solves a single doctrinal controversy. I would guess I've read the Protestant Bible ??? times. A lot more than three. But there are two other books...one was less satisfying each time, and I am done with it. The other...I am getting due for the fourth time.    

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I have long since lost count of the number of times I have read the Standard Works of the Church - I would expect it to be much more than 20 times.

 

My interest in books can be quite eclectic.  Books that I have read more than once:

 

  • Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien
  • The Commentaries by Julius Cesar
  • Dune by Frank Herbert
  • The Dream of Reason by Anthony Gottlieb
  • A Retreat with Francis & Clare - this is something I listen to when driving.
  • My Life with the Saints - by James Martin, another I have listened to multiple times while driving.
  • Don Quixote by Cervantes
  • Faust by Goethe
  • Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
  • Odyssey by Homer

This could get carried away.  I collect books, all kinds of books, those older than 100 years and hard bound books.  My favorite room in the house is our library.  I have read many books multiple times - I still go back to Perrine's book on literature from college. There are so many that I have read and just not gotten back to given the other things that are on my list to read or have been recommended to me.

 

It sounds like you find yourself in the same situation also.  Though I still prefer a book I can hold, touch, see, and feel I have found that while living abroad I buy a lot of audiobooks and do a lot of listening rather than actual reading.  The last book I bought at audible was "Tune in Tokyo" by Tim Anderson.  

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So...what books have you read twice or three times? That means you love the book.

Lord of the rings and Gone With the Wind are a couple books I've read multiple times.

I also love Memoirs of a Geisha.

One of my favorite nonfiction books is about level four viruses and some real life stories dealing with them. That book will make you want to wash your hands! I can't remember the name off of the top if my head but I have it downstairs so I'll post it later.

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Lord of the rings and Gone With the Wind are a couple books I've read multiple times.

I also love Memoirs of a Geisha.

One of my favorite nonfiction books is about level four viruses and some real life stories dealing with them. That book will make you want to wash your hands! I can't remember the name off of the top if my head but I have it downstairs so I'll post it later.

I read Memoirs of a Geisha. I like autobiography books or non fiction. But did get into LDS romance/mystery novels at one time. I love a book I can't put down.
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Bluebell--

 

I haven't read it, but my sister wasn't a fan of Maze Runner either. But being leery of dystopian books is understand able; you can tell when a book published after Hunger Games is trying to hard to go for the same idea, especially when the "love triangle" thing keeps showing up. One of the things I love about The Darkest Minds is that (so far) there is no love triangle, but I also like that the main character isn't the only one affected by what she is/what she can do. Most of the United States' adolescence has been killed by a disease, and the one that haven't died are now different (they have 1 of 5 different abilities; telekinetic, manipulate electricity...), and are being round up and put into what essentially ends up being concentration camps.  The country is broke, and out of fear and desperation for whatever money can get, people are turning these kids to the Special Forces (the people in charge of the camps)

 

It's like a futuristic Nazi Germany.

 

I haven't read any of King's books (which might just be some kind of mortal sin, I'm sure), but I just put Cell on hold at the library and I'll give it a go.  Like I said, if the characters and their situations feel real, I don't mind it so much. I mean, if the author is going to have a character that uses the F-word often, then they had better taken extra time to really flesh that character out and make me care about them. Otherwise I feel like they're going for shock value.

Edited by seriously honestly
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Um, being a bookseller for nearly 15 years now I have lost track of how many books I've read more than once but that number is probably in triple digits by now.  My top reads would take a while to come up with.

 

I tend to alternate between a gospel book, a good easy read, and a children's book (always clean, more literary than people think)..

 

For instance I just finished "Navigating Early" by Newbery Medal winner Clair Vanderpol.

Right now I'm reading "The Life of Heber C. Kimball" by Orson F. Whitney.

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I have long since lost count of the number of times I have read the Standard Works of the Church - I would expect it to be much more than 20 times.

 

My interest in books can be quite eclectic.  Books that I have read more than once:

 

  • Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien
  • The Commentaries by Julius Cesar
  • Dune by Frank Herbert
  • The Dream of Reason by Anthony Gottlieb
  • A Retreat with Francis & Clare - this is something I listen to when driving.
  • My Life with the Saints - by James Martin, another I have listened to multiple times while driving.
  • Don Quixote by Cervantes
  • Faust by Goethe
  • Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
  • Odyssey by Homer

This could get carried away.  I collect books, all kinds of books, those older than 100 years and hard bound books.  My favorite room in the house is our library.  I have read many books multiple times - I still go back to Perrine's book on literature from college. There are so many that I have read and just not gotten back to given the other things that are on my list to read or have been recommended to me.

 

It sounds like you find yourself in the same situation also.  Though I still prefer a book I can hold, touch, see, and feel I have found that while living abroad I buy a lot of audiobooks and do a lot of listening rather than actual reading.  The last book I bought at audible was "Tune in Tokyo" by Tim Anderson.  

 

Hey Storm...I forgot about Lord of the Rings...me too on that one. Dune once. Did you read the whole series twice or just the first book. I decided not to continue even though I enjoyed the first book. You like Faust? I read that thing about suicide...Young Werther and didn't like it...I don't mind finding out my first impression of Goethe was mistaken. As for Cervantes...oh man...that is definitely on my short list to read multiple times.

 

I tried the Iliad a few years ago and it was a labor for me. I want to have read that and the Odyssey, if for no other reason because so much of the literature of our age makes reference to the characters. I am definitely weak in Greek literature. You must have found the Odyssey to be an entertaining read?

 

I have never tried it myself, but in principle, audio books are great, especially if one is able to concentrate sufficiently. In a way it seems like good books beg to be read aloud and listened to aloud. However, it seems like distractions could be easy. Do you think your comprehension is equal?

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Bluebell--

 

I haven't read it, but my sister wasn't a fan of Maze Runner either. But being leery of dystopian books is understand able; you can tell when a book published after Hunger Games is trying to hard to go for the same idea, especially when the "love triangle" thing keeps showing up. One of the things I love about The Darkest Minds is that (so far) there is no love triangle, but I also like that the main character isn't the only one affected by what she is/what she can do. Most of the United States' adolescence has been killed by a disease, and the one that haven't died are now different (they have 1 of 5 different abilities; telekinetic, manipulate electricity...), and are being round up and put into what essentially ends up being concentration camps.  The country is broke, and out of fear and desperation for whatever money can get, people are turning these kids to the Special Forces (the people in charge of the camps)

 

It's like a futuristic Nazi Germany.

 

I haven't read any of King's books (which might just be some kind of mortal sin, I'm sure), but I just put Cell on hold at the library and I'll give it a go.  Like I said, if the characters and their situations feel real, I don't mind it so much. I mean, if the author is going to have a character that uses the F-word often, then they had better taken extra time to really flesh that character out and make me care about them. Otherwise I feel like they're going for shock value.

 

I don't personally get too excited about King.  He's an excellent author and so his books are almost always page turners. Plus, he usually wraps things up with a fairly happy ending, which i appreciate in any depressing book.  And when he wants to he can be scary (though he actually doesn't do scary that often).

 

But his stories tend to get a bit weird and 'out there' and mystical sometimes, and he swears alot which i'm not a fan of.  Plus, he doesn't pull any punches usually so he can be graphic to the point of just disgusting-ness.  I've only read about 3 of his books so my experience with him is not vast, and these things are why.  

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Well naughty old me got into game of thrones and that has consumed me these past few months. On the other hand since I got a kindle, I have been able to download the complete works of various classical authors, and am slowly working my way through paradise lost.

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Well naughty old me got into game of thrones and that has consumed me these past few months. On the other hand since I got a kindle, I have been able to download the complete works of various classical authors, and am slowly working my way through paradise lost.

I keep hearing about this show but have never seen it. Is the series based on books?

And why does it make you naughty??

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Oh by the way in "Killing Lincoln", you will learn that Bob Was invited to the play where Abe was killed, and was just a few blocks from the theater ad by his side when he died. He (Bob, or Robert if you will) became the head of the war department and witnessed the murder of four Presidents. In one attempt where he was with the President and Davy Crocket.

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I keep hearing about this show but have never seen it. Is the series based on books?

And why does it make you naughty??

The series has considerable amounts of sex and violence. The reason I still read it is because I have never read a series of books that has made me care about the characters as much as this series. Right now I'm also reading Plato, Milton, and other classical works so I figure a little fluff is okay!

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I'm slowly working through Augustine's Confessions and I really like it. So far it's basically his spiritual autobiography. He explains the issues he had with Christianity and how they were resolved. It's surprisingly relevant to our day -- he had faith vs. science issues and at one point seemed to be wondering if all truth was relative.

I love the Game of Thrones books mainly because of the characterization. The characters are real people and very few are stereotypical good or bad characters. I don't recommend watching the series; I saw the first two episodes and that was more than enough. The books have explicit scenes but it's possible to skip them.

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I just finished reading Antony Beevor's The Fall of Berlin 1945, for the second time.  This time on Kindle.

 

It is an excellent and highly detailed description on the conduct of the war on the eastern front, between Germany and the Soviet Union.  It includes a great deal of detail on the suffering of the civilian population in East Prussia and Berlin.  And of course I have a personal connection to the events, since my wife and her family lived in East Prussia and had to flee to try get out of the way of the Red Army.  And didn't succeed.  This book helped me out a great deal while I was editing and writing our two family memoirs, and besides all that, is an excellent history.

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I just finished reading Antony Beevor's The Fall of Berlin 1945, for the second time.  This time on Kindle.

 

It is an excellent and highly detailed description on the conduct of the war on the eastern front, between Germany and the Soviet Union.  It includes a great deal of detail on the suffering of the civilian population in East Prussia and Berlin.  And of course I have a personal connection to the events, since my wife and her family lived in East Prussia and had to flee to try get out of the way of the Red Army.  And didn't succeed.  This book helped me out a great deal while I was editing and writing our two family memoirs, and besides all that, is an excellent history.

 

Hi Stargazer, I read something similar by John Toland a long time ago, The Last 100 Days. Beevor also did an excellent job with Stalingrad, about the defense and eventual relief of the siege during the same war. Somebody said all history is military history I think? Something like that. It might be an exaggeration, but I am always able to read military history. Who would want to read about Stalingrad if a war hadn't raged across it?

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