Jump to content

Church To Build A 32 Story Apartment Complex In Philly


Avatar4321

Recommended Posts

The Hong Kong China Temple is located in the beautiful residential district of Kowloon Tong, a suburb of Hong Kong on the Kowloon Peninsula. The temple proper occupies the top three floors of the building while a meetinghouse, mission office, apartments for the temple president and mission president, and Beehive Clothing outlet fill the balance of the building. Under the plaza level is the baptistry and underground parking facility. The striking edice, characterized by Hong Kong colonial architecture, features high arching windows, ornamented walls, and a gold dome supporting the single spire and gold-leafed angel Moroni statue.

Located at the intersection of West 65th Street, Broadway, and Columbus Avenue, the Manhattan New York Temple stands among some of New York City's most prominent landmarks including the Lincoln Center, home of the renowned Juilliard School, and Central Park. The temple proper occupies the top three floors of the edifice while the baptistry operates on the first floor; a meetinghouse spans the third floor, and the second floor houses a public affairs office and distribution center. From the lobby, there is a separate door to enter the temple inscribed Holiness to the Lord.

Link to comment

Gosh and paying taxes too.  I wonder how a critic is going to find a problem with that?  Oh, I know; if they have money for real estate development they should have given it to the poor.  But then again, they do that already. So the issue will be?  Hmm, Philidelphia is not really a big enough location for LDS and so they are sticking their noses where it does not belong.  Good enough for critics I guess. 

Link to comment

Gosh and paying taxes too.  I wonder how a critic is going to find a problem with that?  Oh, I know; if they have money for real estate development they should have given it to the poor.  But then again, they do that already. So the issue will be?  Hmm, Philidelphia is not really a big enough location for LDS and so they are sticking their noses where it does not belong.  Good enough for critics I guess. 

Bold mine.

 

Answer:  Well, the church is a corporation then.  Neener, neener!

 

I'm only half kidding, I saw this comment, hand delivered to you Storm ;).  But it kind of makes sense.  Should what this commenter said, concern us?

 

"There are two distinct financial models on the opposite end of the spectrum---the "fish and loaves model" and the "corporate investing model." Jesus unveiled the fish and loaves model where he took what little his kingdom had and distributed it among the least without reservation. In mimetic faith the baskets filled and refilled by those inspired by Jesus; whereas the corporate model is one born out of lack of faith where financial "granaries" are built to SOMEDAY maybe leak out a few usurious portion to the least. The problem with the corporate model is that it is so damn uninspiring and a faithless demonstration that "they" do not trust us to fill the baskets so they invest vatican style. Unwittingly they kill the golden goose--the faith of those adherents that were and are the wellspring of giving."

 

 

And just to add more, I'm milking this ETA!  What about the school in Mexico that the church discontinued and made into an MTC, why not build a new MTC?? 

Link to comment

I don't think on this scale. Weren't the Hong Kong and Manhattan temples part of a complex...but no retail space, iirc, just church related stuff.

 

For the Manhattan Temple, the Church actually owns the entire block/complex that the building is attached to.  There's a restaurant next door, and maybe a small museum or something as well.  The Church owns all of that, and the space is leased, from what I understand.  I think there are also apartments for the senior missionaries serving in the temple in that same complex attached to the temple/meetinghouse.

Link to comment

Oh, I know; if they have money for real estate development they should have given it to the poor.  But then again, they do that already. So the issue will be? 

 

For me, it's an issue of the mission of the church and the lack of common consent.

 

For some, I believe, it's the ratio of how much we use for humanitarian aid vs. how much we use for real estate development.

 

LDS.org's Welfare Services Fact Sheet

 

The cost of this residential tower in Philadelphia represents over two full years worth of our average humanitarian aid (just to give some perspective to the figures).

 

Put in other terms, the cost of this residential development per member is $8.57 ($120m / 14m members).  Our average annual humanitarian aid per member over the timeframe given in the above fact sheet is $5.04 ($1.4b / 27 years / 10,286,909 avg annual membership over that time period).

Link to comment

Gosh and paying taxes too.  I wonder how a critic is going to find a problem with that?  Oh, I know; if they have money for real estate development they should have given it to the poor.  But then again, they do that already. So the issue will be?  Hmm, Philidelphia is not really a big enough location for LDS and so they are sticking their noses where it does not belong.  Good enough for critics I guess. 

 

It will be.

Link to comment

The cost of this residential tower in Philadelphia represents over two full years worth of our average humanitarian aid (just to give some perspective to the figures).

 

Put in other terms, the cost of this residential development per member is $8.57 ($120m / 14m members).  Our average annual humanitarian aid per member over the timeframe given in the above fact sheet is $5.04 ($1.4b / 27 years / 10,286,909 avg annual membership over that time period).

 

How accurate is this perspective really, when your calculation fails to include an estimate for LDS-aid in all its forms--ex., fast offerings and PEF; or do you feel only the aid we provide to people outside the Church "counts"?

Link to comment

How accurate is this perspective really, when your calculation fails to include an estimate for LDS-aid in all its forms--ex., fast offerings and PEF; or do you feel only the aid we provide to people outside the Church "counts"?

 

I don't know.  I gave the stats with the only numbers that the church publishes and they do not say what is included in that $1.4B figure.

Link to comment

What is questionable about the news sites with the story? I saw the story quoted by an Area seventy this morning.

I see there have been multiple other reports, since, and trust the validity now.

Honestly, I thought it was a satire, a la The Onion. It just seems like a very non-church thing to do.

Link to comment

I don't know.  I gave the stats with the only numbers that the church publishes and they do not say what is included in that $1.4B figure.

 

The $1.4B Humanitarian Aid figure references "disaster assistance" which the Church provided between 1985 and 2011.  The aid/assistance was provided in 179 countries and territories in response to 202 major disasters.

Link to comment

The $1.4B Humanitarian Aid figure references "disaster assistance" which the Church provided between 1985 and 2011.  The aid/assistance was provided in 179 countries and territories in response to 202 major disasters.

 

It does not actually say that.  The $1.4B figure is the only dollar amount noted anywhere on the "Welfare Services Fact Sheet" that I referenced.  The one-page sheet references all of our welfare activities, including storehouses and distribution facilities.

Link to comment

It does not actually say that.  The $1.4B figure is the only dollar amount noted anywhere on the "Welfare Services Fact Sheet" that I referenced.  The one-page sheet references all of our welfare activities, including storehouses and distribution facilities.

 

Perhaps you are correct; although, I doubt it.  I read it as two separate data "tables." The first table details Welfare services for the year 2011 and includes non-monetary information just for 2011.  The second data table below it references disaster assistance specifically for the years 1985 - 2011.  The $1.4B total immediately below references the same years (1985 - 2011)--which (at least in my mind) is a monetary summary of the disaster relief outlined above.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...