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Transgender People And Marriage Within The Church


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I am a bisexual transgender woman who has transition from male to female. I live in a state where gay marriage is legal. My state considers me me a woman. So under the eyes of my state and the federal government, if I marry a woman (as I have), it will be a gay marriage,

 

I'm not clear what gender the church considers me. The proclamation of the family says that gender roles are eternal, but doesn't define how to find gender.

 

This is a problem because to me at least, it seems that for any way you define gender, you have the option for something in between. Chromosomes? Plenty of people who are XXY out there. Genitalia? Plenty of intersex folks. Secondary sex characteristics? I have breasts and have had my facial hair removed. Hormones? I tend to have slightly more estrogen than a natural woman.

 

Personally, I don't believe there are just two genders. I think I am a third.

 

So, if the church opposes gay marriage who are trans-people supposed to marry?

 

I haven't been able to find a clear answer, and I think my family is confused as to whether I am living in sin by having sex with my wife or not.

 

Curious if anyone has a doctrinal response to that or generally how the church defines gender in ambiguous cases.

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Curious if anyone has a doctrinal response to that or generally how the church defines gender in ambiguous cases.

My opinion:

 

Fair or not, since we are all born helpless, our gender is at the very least defined for societal purposes by those who bring us into the world, until we can identify it for ourselves. Most parents choose between only two genders. So when their child grows up and decides he is not that gender (or is a third gender) and this does not fit with the paradigm of his parents, then at least he has the question settled within himself and hopefully they can all continue to enjoy their family relationships as adults.

 

The Church uses two genders and has guidance on how to address the spiritual needs of those who have altered their bodies to match a self-identified gender that is different from that which their parents concluded it to be. Because exceptions to the general guidance require an intimate understanding of the situation, I would think each case would warrant a conversation with the local priesthood authority to determine how to best address the covenants and ordinances of salvation the individual needs.

 

I think there is room in the Church for someone who concludes that he is neither male nor female. It goes without saying that he can participate where neither gender is germane to a covenant or calling, and I would think can even choose a mutually agreeable gender for practical purposes. Any mistakes can be fixed in the hereafter.

 

The Church only performs and recognizes marriage between a man and woman who agree with each other that one spouse is a man and one spouse is a woman, and of course if the officiator agrees with them. If anyone is mistaken in their assessment, that can be fixed in the hereafter. But the covenant of marriage follows the paradigm of two sexes, regardless of what gender the spouses identify for themselves.

Edited by CV75
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My opinion:

 

Fair or not, since we are all born helpless, our gender is at the very least defined for societal purposes by those who bring us into the world, until we can identify it for ourselves. Most parents choose between only two genders. So when their child grows up and decides he is not that gender (or is a third gender) and this does not fit with the paradigm of his parents, then at least he has the question settled within himself and hopefully they can all continue to enjoy their family relationships as adults.

 

The Church uses two genders and has guidance on how to address the spiritual needs of those who have altered their bodies to match a self-identified gender that is different from that which their parents concluded it to be. Because exceptions to the general guidance require an intimate understanding of the situation, I would think each case would warrant a conversation with the local priesthood authority to determine how to best address the covenants and ordinances of salvation the individual needs.

 

I think there is room in the Church for someone who concludes that he is neither male nor female. It goes without saying that he can participate where neither gender is germane to a covenant or calling, and I would think can even choose a mutually agreeable gender for practical purposes. Any mistakes can be fixed in the hereafter.

 

The Church only performs and recognizes marriage between a man and woman who agree with each other that one spouse is a man and one spouse is a woman, and of course if the officiator agrees with them. If anyone is mistaken in their assessment, that can be fixed in the hereafter. But the covenant of marriage follows the paradigm of two sexes, regardless of what gender the spouses identify for themselves.

My parents view me as a woman too. Your statement assumes they can't change their minds =).

 

Also, please don't use the pronoun "he" when referring to me or a hypothetical to me. I find it personally offensive, but I recognize you did not know

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My parents view me as a woman too. Your statement assumes they can't change their minds =).

 

Also, please don't use the pronoun "he" when referring to me or a hypothetical to me. I find it personally offensive, but I recognize you did not know

I wasn't referring to you. I was using pronoun "he" in the intended gender-neutral meaning... Your statement assumes I did not know how I was using it. =)

 

Now that we got that out of the way, I hope my remarks were able to help you and your family reduce any discomfiting confusion.

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