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Utah Drivers This Bad ???


EllenMaksoud

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Using data on traffic fatalities, failure to obey traffic rules and drunk driving, CarInsuranceComparison.com determined that Utah drivers are among the best drivers in the nation overall, second only to Vermont.

The data came from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the National Motorists Association, and Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

Utah had the cleanest record for drunk driving incidents in the United States. The Beehive State also ranked 12th for failure to obey traffic signals and seat belt laws. For fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, Utah ranked 14th in the nation. Tickets and careless driving were its highest rankings, coming in 20th and 23rd place, respectively.

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=28053587#ya937lcHPkPwTQF3.99

 

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I have found that in the several places I have lived in my life, the people are always  convinced that their fellow motorists are worse than anywhere else. I just don't see it. 

 

Somebody says. "Well you haven't driven in Southern California if you don't notice any difference in drivers." I've driven professionally from coast to coast as well as for vacations in areas like SoCal where drivers have to adapt to unique conditions. You can't get around on SoCal freeways like you are driving in the Vermont countryside! 

 

So does anybody have the opinion that they live in the area that has the best drivers? I don't really see that either. But if everywhere is the worst, everywhere is the best! Glass half-full for me!

 

Old people in RV's drive the same way whether they are from Florida or Oklahoma. Young guys in pickups drive the same way no matter where they come from. I guarantee you that truck drivers like me share a lot of the same ideas about the road regardless of where we live. When I am driving, especially professionally, I need to plan more in advance for lane switching and other adjustments because of length and unequal speed limits for commercial vehicles. it is a subconscious habit that I look for age, sex, and the kind of vehicle that is being driven to get hints for how to expect a motorist to perform. I didn't even realize how much information I received from such observations until I began to be annoyed with the recent popularity of tinted glass that covers up some of the information that informed me about how I could expect the driver to behave. You can't see hand signals either. Have you ever seen gestures, but not clearly because of the glass, from these people who forget they have hidden themselves from us? I look to license plates too, but not because I think that persons from one place are going to be better or worse than another. If someone is from far away, you can obviously expect brake tapping and timid driving in the city.

 

Wow. You can tell I am on vacation. Sharing my philosophy of the road? I could write a book. Better yet...I think I'll go read a book. Happy motoring.

Edited by 3DOP
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Yes, it is uphill and hard...but if it were not hard it would not be as joyful. :)

I285 around Atlanta was once voted fastest interstate in America, I have driven a number of times up and down I15. Both had drivers that thought driving was a blood sport. :(

Just noticed a quote from another thread ended up here.

Edited by Bill “Papa” Lee
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It's fun to watch the youtube videos of India traffic, or someplace in SE Asia. I don't think I would survive a hour on those roads. Also watch the car crashes as recorded on the dash cams in Russia. Just scary!!!

I remember when we were in Moscow on the seventh floor of an apartment building on the major road that circles the city.  Clinton was coming to town and so the mayor finally had the lane lines painted in.  We lost two lanes going each way over night, IIRC.  We never drove in Moscow, not having a car, but I never wanted to.  The few times our Russian friend drove us around he would drive up on the sidewalk, go down a one way street the wrong way, stuff like that...I just sat in back and closed my eyes and deep breathed.

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When I was a young driver and seat belts were stuffed down in the seat, never to be worn. My mom and I were coming back from listening to Camilla Kimball and her daughters at the RS Building in Salt Lake. And before starting out we decided to wear our seat belts, don't know why. Coming home on Beck Street there is a fork that will take you to NSL and north on I-15. Well a car several cars ahead, completely stopped and caused people behind it to crash, the crazy driver took off unharmed. I was the last driver, and got the ticket, and mom and I got some bruising from the impact from the big truck we plowed into, but feel the seat belt saved us.

Tonight coming home I got off the freeway and came to the stop light and an older guy was stopped and out of his car and talking to another driver, then that car zoomed around him and took off and the older guy jumped back in his car and chased the car. I think it was road rage. That's a big problem everywhere, I'm thinking.

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I am sure my grandmother before she died contributed heavily to the negative stats in Utah.  I don't know why it took so long to take the car away, but then I was the granddaughter and not the child so I am sure I was lacking in sympathy...but having been nearly killed or at least disfigured by Grandma's lack of attention to driving due to my younger siblings fighting in the back seat and later on sitting frozen in the front seat as we drove down the wrong side of the street when she got flustered by the lines of a turn lane, it was not a pleasant thought her out there with a car and a set of keys.  Thank goodness for seatbelts, I would have gone straight through the window into a barbwire fence without it, as it was I probably got set up for life with migraines even if the only outward sign was a scratch from where my glasses split in two from hitting the dashboard....but that could have been from cracking my skull as a toddler when I'd climb out of the crib, over the fence, etc.

 

I have since then looked on the car as a deadly weapon and will take no chances if my driving is the least impaired.  I don't particularly care if I kill myself, but I don't believe I could live with killing someone else's child.  Grandmother was so selfish in her insistence that she could still drive even after multiple accidents.  It was always someone else's fault (the driving wheel wrenched itself out of her hands in the case where she drove off the side of the freeway with us and through the ditch and fence) and as long as she could walk away with just a few bruises, she didn't see how anything could possibly be wrong.

 

I know my mom will listen to me when I say it's time...don't know about my dad though.  He had to put his foot down with his parents, so at least I have that to appeal to....it is getting way too close.

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I feel for you when that day comes. Sadly I did get some anxiety tonight on the freeway, that's why I got off early to take the back roads. My night vision is not what it use to be. I couldn't bear to take anyone's life, or injure because of my freezing up on the road sometimes.

You're right, our vehicles are a deadly weapon, and we should remember it and stay a safe distance on the road, look all around, just drive like we mean it, and not have anything distract us.

My husband rarely uses the turn signals, I get so upset. He says he will if a car is right behind or close, but he forgets.

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I am sure my grandmother before she died contributed heavily to the negative stats in Utah.  I don't know why it took so long to take the car away, but then I was the granddaughter and not the child so I am sure I was lacking in sympathy...but having been nearly killed or at least disfigured by Grandma's lack of attention to driving due to my younger siblings fighting in the back seat and later on sitting frozen in the front seat as we drove down the wrong side of the street when she got flustered by the lines of a turn lane, it was not a pleasant thought her out there with a car and a set of keys.  Thank goodness for seatbelts, I would have gone straight through the window into a barbwire fence without it, as it was I probably got set up for life with migraines even if the only outward sign was a scratch from where my glasses split in two from hitting the dashboard....but that could have been from cracking my skull as a toddler when I'd climb out of the crib, over the fence, etc.

 

I have since then looked on the car as a deadly weapon and will take no chances if my driving is the least impaired.  I don't particularly care if I kill myself, but I don't believe I could live with killing someone else's child.  Grandmother was so selfish in her insistence that she could still drive even after multiple accidents.  It was always someone else's fault (the driving wheel wrenched itself out of her hands in the case where she drove off the side of the freeway with us and through the ditch and fence) and as long as she could walk away with just a few bruises, she didn't see how anything could possibly be wrong.

 

I know my mom will listen to me when I say it's time...don't know about my dad though.  He had to put his foot down with his parents, so at least I have that to appeal to....it is getting way too close.

I've got cataracts that I would not have known about if the Doctor had not told me of.  Last night, driving home in the dark, I could first notice them because of the glary, sparklies around lights. I'm thinking that night driving is OFF until they remove them.

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  • 1 month later...

Having experienced driving in nearly all the states west of the Mississippi and south of Virginia I thought I was pretty safe in concluding that Utah drivers were the worst. Then I tried driving in NYC and I had a complete paradigm shift. I will say that although there are plenty of bad drivers to go around it does seem that people drive badly in different places for different reasons. In Utah for example I just get the impression that most bad motorists are oblivious. I see a lot of people driving under the speed limit in the leftmost lane on the interstate and it makes me crazy. Driving in NYC on the other hand one doesn't get very far without paying attention. People drive badly there because they are just plain rude, and I don't really blame them. After a week of driving those roads I found myself cutting people off, laying on my horn and giving "hand signals" in protest of other drivers!

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Since there are no Belgians on the board to defend themselves, I nominate Brussels drivers as completely insane. Spent two days there last fall as part of a return-to-my-mission-field vacation, and couldn't wait to get out of town. All of the traffic in Europe was busy, and the lanes narrow, but only in Brussels did I feel actually afraid for my well-being. We don't know how good we have it here in the states.

I think Utah might get it's rep from the fact that the car that guns it and swerves around you is a min-van with mom at the wheel instead of a sporty little compact. 

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