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Okay, the Church has announced that it will open a branch campus of BYU in Southern California.  I mentioned this to my wife who is much more defensive of the Church than I, and got the following immediate reaction, "Oh great another school out west."  That kind of shocked me coming from her, although it basically reflected my thinking on the subject, and I suspect will be similar to a lot of shrugs and sighs from members east of the Mississippi.  Since we will never likely know the real nitty gritty behind the decision, we are left to shoulder on and support the Brethren in this call and hope that eventually somewhere outside the American west will surface on their educational radar.

 

But one can still wonder about the thinking.  Was it based upon the concentration of Mormon members? Was it based on the fact that Southern California was part of the original State of Deseret?  Was it because the people doing the feasibility study took only certain factors into account?

 

There have been members and academics from time to time who have struggled to get a Mormon based school up and running in Nauvoo.  Given a college in Nauvoo was part of Joseph Smith's vision for the settlement, and we have rebuildt the the Temple there -- why was Nauvoo rejected.  Given the Mormon historical presence in Independence, Missouri and Palmyra, New York and Sharon/South Royalton and investments there why were they rejected.

 

Oft times such places as Nauvoo, Independence, Palmyra and Sharon/South Royalton are rejected with the comment that we are a worldwide Church so we have to consider the needs of the foreign Saints.  Oh really?  Then why not announce a college in Meso-America, South America, or say Tonga or Samoa?

 

The announcement of a Branch campus in either the historical sites or the named foreign sites would be major and continuing positive publicity for the Church.  In either it would dramatically increase the Mormon missionary activity in the area and expand Mormondom, in Southern California it will be met with "ho hum" and what else is in the news.  Its like Temple locations.  Big cities you have to make a major capital investment for the Temple to have any lasting impression on the community, whereas in a smaller community such as Nauvoo or Sharon/South Royalton even a small Temple, or in the latter case even a micro-Temple would be a major ongoing and persistent positive impact.

 

Oh well, how do others feel?

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My guess is it has a lot to do with the available local population that wants to go to BYU, and possibly a donor who donated property, IF the claim is actually true.  Haven't heard about it yet, and will be surprised if it is true.  Could be private people doing a BYU like place --- similar to Southern University.

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And no, goggling turns out the announcement was in the Bunyon --- a satire site.

You may be right, although it is a little unclear as there has been an adult education center there since I guess the 1960's, but there is a blog posting questioning it and a flurry of conflicting comments. My apologies if I inadvertently got taken in by a satire site.

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I know there's a church affiliated college somewhere in Virginia right?  Southern Virginia?  I know a couple of people who went there, but it is expensive and last time i looked (it's been a while) they seemed to be having trouble getting the numbers they needed. 

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I know there's a church affiliated college somewhere in Virginia right? Southern Virginia? I know a couple of people who went there, but it is expensive and last time i looked (it's been a while) they seemed to be having trouble getting the numbers they needed.

My BIL & SIL served a mission there. He retired from the CES and last taught on the college level. He taught institute at Southern Virginia as their mission, he and his wife held a lot of socials to invite nonmembers to the classes. I don't believe the church owns the college outright though, but as you said affiliated with it.
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Greg Prince's McKay Biography discusses the church education system in the 1950s and 60s.  We owned land back then with the intent to build BYUs in at least Arizona, Oregon, and Southern Cal.  BYU's President Wilkinson pushed hard for the new campuses, but there was not enough money.  I believe the Oregon property became the site of the Portland Temple. 

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I know there's a church affiliated college somewhere in Virginia right?  Southern Virginia?  I know a couple of people who went there, but it is expensive and last time i looked (it's been a while) they seemed to be having trouble getting the numbers they needed. 

 

Its not Church affiliated.  My understanding is it was a college that was acquired by wealthy Mormons for their children who didn't make the admission cut for BYU or Ricks.  It is still operating down there and they recruit Mormons.   I used to know of some colleges in Indiana which were for the financially gifted and academically challenged, don't know it that was true of the school in Virginia or not.  BYU is a very important institution for Mormonism without any regard to its educational properties -- it is an essential marriage mill for the faith, and we need similar marriage mills east of the Mississippi -- it of course is also important for other reasons, and this comment was not intended as dissing its academic credidentials.  For my first three kids they were told that they could go to any college they wanted so long as the acronym was BYU.  Unfortunately, that family policy didn't play out so well -- so reduced it to they had to go there their Freshman year and then I just abandoned the concept altogether with the rest of the kids.

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I was under the impression that the Church was not expanding the university operations. Obviously, if the Lord reveals something new, they will do it. But church run schools are expensive.

 

I also understood the Perpetual education fund was designed to help members from other countries obtain an education without the Church needing to build universities throughout the world.

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Okay, the Church has announced that it will open a branch campus of BYU in Southern California.  I mentioned this to my wife who is much more defensive of the Church than I, and got the following immediate reaction, "Oh great another school out west."  That kind of shocked me coming from her, although it basically reflected my thinking on the subject, and I suspect will be similar to a lot of shrugs and sighs from members east of the Mississippi.  Since we will never likely know the real nitty gritty behind the decision, we are left to shoulder on and support the Brethren in this call and hope that eventually somewhere outside the American west will surface on their educational radar.

 

But one can still wonder about the thinking.  Was it based upon the concentration of Mormon members? Was it based on the fact that Southern California was part of the original State of Deseret?  Was it because the people doing the feasibility study took only certain factors into account?

 

There have been members and academics from time to time who have struggled to get a Mormon based school up and running in Nauvoo.  Given a college in Nauvoo was part of Joseph Smith's vision for the settlement, and we have rebuildt the the Temple there -- why was Nauvoo rejected.  Given the Mormon historical presence in Independence, Missouri and Palmyra, New York and Sharon/South Royalton and investments there why were they rejected.

 

Oft times such places as Nauvoo, Independence, Palmyra and Sharon/South Royalton are rejected with the comment that we are a worldwide Church so we have to consider the needs of the foreign Saints.  Oh really?  Then why not announce a college in Meso-America, South America, or say Tonga or Samoa?

 

The announcement of a Branch campus in either the historical sites or the named foreign sites would be major and continuing positive publicity for the Church.  In either it would dramatically increase the Mormon missionary activity in the area and expand Mormondom, in Southern California it will be met with "ho hum" and what else is in the news.  Its like Temple locations.  Big cities you have to make a major capital investment for the Temple to have any lasting impression on the community, whereas in a smaller community such as Nauvoo or Sharon/South Royalton even a small Temple, or in the latter case even a micro-Temple would be a major ongoing and persistent positive impact.

 

Oh well, how do others feel?

A few years ago they were going to build a campus in San Clemente, but the plan was nixed by the city council.  The land, which was donated by a member-rancher went unused for decades.  About time they built this.  Where exactly will it be?

Edited by Ron Beron
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A few years ago they were going to build a campus in San Clemente, but the plan was nixed by the city council.  The land, which was donated by a member-rancher went unused for decades.  About time they built this.  Where exactly will it be?

The article I read may be a hoax, there is genuine disagreement as to whether there really was such an announcement.

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Yeah that was the article, but it may be a parody.

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Yeah that was the article, but it may be a parody.

 

This part of the article makes me CERTAIN it is a parody:

 

 

The official BYU crest, which bears the insignia “The glory of God is intelligence,” is currently being translated into local dialect. Locals are eager as to which dialect will be featured—traditional (La Gloria de Dios es la inteligencia) or modern (Learning is so chill, bro!).

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This part of the article makes me CERTAIN it is a parody:

You seem to be correct.  I read further...

“Each campus has its own unique identity,” comments Russell R. Madsen of the planning committee. “Jerusalem offers students a chance to explore the Holy Land, Hawaii provides a rich cultural experience with the Pacific islands, Rexburg is for people who want to get married and Provo is for students who actually want to get an education. We’re hoping that BYU – California will be a place where the rich California kids can get a degree without having to work hard or travel far.”

 

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You seem to be correct.  I read further...

Yeah, I was taken in by not reading to the very end .

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