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Creeped Out By "hunger Games".


EllenMaksoud

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Ellen...

I tried to send you a note wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving, but got a message that you could not receive any new messages... your mailbox must be full...

 

GG

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It's a mind-twisting premise. Kids running around killing each other for entertainment.

 

As a reader you sit, scathingly critical of the awful people in the 'Capitol' who organise these events for their own viewing pleasure... only to realise you are thoroughly enjoying it too. We are the Capitol!

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The Hunger Games Trilogy is actually a really interesting and deep story.  Yes, it's entertainment, though that doesn't mean that it can't be a really excellent tool in teaching youth more about the world around them, about evil, our own human history, and maybe most importantly, how to interpret actions or experiences that they might otherwise not be able to 'see' correctly.

 

In the books there are allusions to ancient Rome and gladiatorial bloodshed for entertainment.  It is also allegorical in nature, where the Capitol can represent America and American culture and the Districts could represent poor countries or groups of people which are forced into a servant relationship with the US, at the peril of their own selves.  It can also be used as a way to connect youth of today to atrocities which have happened in history, but which they have no real sense of (it is frightening that there are kids alive and in high school right now that didn't know that the Holocaust actually occurred and which, when presented materials produced by 'Holocaust Deniers' felt that the material was well researched and convincing).

 

We have to find a way to teach kids in this generation that evil people do exist, that evil injures the innocent and powerless more than any other group of people (despite what Hollywood tends to show, which is that children are generally not to be fodder for gratuitous violence) that good people can easily be led into accepting  and promoting evil while still considering themselves to be 'good' people, and that it's not ok to go along with the flow just because you are benefiting from it.

 

The Hunger Games is certainly not the only way to teach such lessons, and I'm not arguing that it's even the best way to teach them.  But, if you have teens that are enamored with the book (and this series is definitely not suitable for younger kids), parents could definitely use that to their advantage.

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In the books there are allusions to ancient Rome and gladiatorial bloodshed for entertainment.  It is also allegorical in nature, where the Capitol can represent America and American culture and the Districts could represent poor countries or groups of people which are forced into a servant relationship with the US, at the peril of their own selves. 

See I thought that this was what the book er movies was trying to portray. Only to realize there is no real comparison to America as the capitol and the districts are the rest of the world save only that America is the wealthiest nation. I named a few real differences. One is that America is the most generous nation in the world. Or that we have lots of money we also donate lots of it to different things. Also we don't have any type fo games were we take from the districts and then have them kill each other. Another major difference is the US for the most part does not dictate to the "discticts" its will.  For the most part we do let nations govern themselves. What I look ath the hunger games I see the dangers of a dictatorship and communisim. That is what I see. It looks like the old regiems of the 30's through the 60's. Anyway it is interesting to see what people see in the books.

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It's a mind-twisting premise. Kids running around killing each other for entertainment.

 

As a reader you sit, scathingly critical of the awful people in the 'Capitol' who organise these events for their own viewing pleasure... only to realise you are thoroughly enjoying it too. We are the Capitol!

Which is exactly why I will not watch the movies or read the books. It reminds me too much of real life.

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The Hunger Games Trilogy is actually a really interesting and deep story.  Yes, it's entertainment, though that doesn't mean that it can't be a really excellent tool in teaching youth more about the world around them, about evil, our own human history, and maybe most importantly, how to interpret actions or experiences that they might otherwise not be able to 'see' correctly.

 

In the books there are allusions to ancient Rome and gladiatorial bloodshed for entertainment.  It is also allegorical in nature, where the Capitol can represent America and American culture and the Districts could represent poor countries or groups of people which are forced into a servant relationship with the US, at the peril of their own selves.  It can also be used as a way to connect youth of today to atrocities which have happened in history, but which they have no real sense of (it is frightening that there are kids alive and in high school right now that didn't know that the Holocaust actually occurred and which, when presented materials produced by 'Holocaust Deniers' felt that the material was well researched and convincing).

 

We have to find a way to teach kids in this generation that evil people do exist, that evil injures the innocent and powerless more than any other group of people (despite what Hollywood tends to show, which is that children are generally not to be fodder for gratuitous violence) that good people can easily be led into accepting  and promoting evil while still considering themselves to be 'good' people, and that it's not ok to go along with the flow just because you are benefiting from it.

 

The Hunger Games is certainly not the only way to teach such lessons, and I'm not arguing that it's even the best way to teach them.  But, if you have teens that are enamored with the book (and this series is definitely not suitable for younger kids), parents could definitely use that to their advantage.

What? Huh ? Run that by me again?  I am already aware that some humans are right plunkers.

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Which is exactly why I will not watch the movies or read the books. It reminds me too much of real life.

I go to movies for fun and to escape, not to be taught lessons about life.  Life does that well enough for me.  :)

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I go to movies for fun and to escape, not to be taught lessons about life.  Life does that well enough for me.   :)

I rarely get the upper hand in a conversation, part of the time simply because I do not wish to be confrontive in an unkind way. However, the other day I was riding with a friend and was playing an LDS CD that has "Onward Christian Soldiers" on it and it started to play. I made it skip forward a song and then said softly, "I hate that song".  She asked me why,  and I said, "I know what being a soldier is like."  I feel the same way about "Hunger Games" and it makes me wonder why seeing people killed in such a ruthless way could be construed as entertainment.

 

So far, for the most part America has avoided warfare in the streets since the civil war. That may not always be the case. :)

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Those who have not been exposed to the reality of war and the death it brings definitely look on it differently than those who have from what I've seen.  It is one thing I admit I have nothing in my experience that allows me to even imagine I can relate to it.

 

I have no desire to either, I've never even been able to tolerate any type of war movie (I don't think of them as fiction even when they are, but about the real people they are comparing themselves to and the real suffering that those individuals had to go through and often still go through...and dealing with others' suffering when I can't do anything about it...well, if I have a choice, I will avoid it...I read a lot on the holocaust and Israel's early years when I was in my early and mid teens, I think that was enough to teach me about the horrors of war, I don't feel the need for constant refresher courses) so I can just imagine I would freak out in the real thing.

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