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Confessions Of A Cultural Mormon


Okrahomer

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Is it just me, or is the author of this article trying to eat her cake and have it too?

 

No she's not. She's rejected Mormonism outright but  thinks she has a good idea, based on the findings of the study she cites, to create some sort of modern, secular, non-religious version of a "faith community" (there's an oxymoron, if there ever was one!) as a viable substitute for a genuine faith community based on a belief in Cod and His laws. Problem is what does one use as a substitute for God in this sort of pseudo faith community? What could possibly be an adequate substitute for a just, merciful, omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent and all loving God. I know some have started earthbound religions that attempt to substitute atheistic tyrants for God, but these secular cults don't seem to pan out too well. 

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No she's not. She's rejected Mormonism outright but  thinks she has a good idea, based on the findings of the study she cites, to create some sort of modern, secular, non-religious version of a "faith community" (there's an oxymoron, if there ever was one!) as a viable substitute for a genuine faith community based on a belief in Cod and His laws. Problem is what does one use as a substitute for God in this sort of pseudo faith community? What could possibly be an adequate substitute for a just, merciful, omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent and all loving God. I know some have started earthbound religions that attempt to substitute atheistic tyrants for God, but these secular cults don't seem to pan out too well. 

 

Yes, I think you've captured "it" better there.

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No she's not. She's rejected Mormonism outright but  thinks she has a good idea, based on the findings of the study she cites, to create some sort of modern, secular, non-religious version of a "faith community" (there's an oxymoron, if there ever was one!) as a viable substitute for a genuine faith community based on a belief in Cod [sic] and His laws. 

I believe fervently in Cod, but is it OK if I believe in Trout, Salmon, and Haddock, too? ;):D:rofl:

 

Sorry; couldn't resist! ;)

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Is it possible for a LDS member who no longer believes but wants to stay in the church? Perhaps they belief and God and accept Christ but do not believe in the historicity of the BOM and BOA and FV.? They pay tithing etc, live the  code and attend church. Is that possible? Would there very presence there be a problem?. Someone might ask if they have been to the temple, what position do they hold etc.

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The gospel tent is  a large and wide one.  Most who want to be in the tent are allowed to be/remain in the tent.    But there can be cognitive dissonance, as well as misunderstandings with members who think that their way to live the gospel is the only way to faithfully live the gospel and it is their job to enforce their views on others.

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The gospel tent is  a large and wide one.  Most who want to be in the tent are allowed to be/remain in the tent.    But there can be cognitive dissonance, as well as misunderstandings with members who think that their way to live the gospel is the only way to faithfully live the gospel and it is their job to enforce their views on others.

 

The Church tent is. The gospel is not a tent. It's a road and we are told it is narrow and almost no one finds it.

 

Now admittedly everyone has their own individual narrow road to walk and you get jackasses in the church who tell you that you are going the wrong way (protip: these people are probably more church tent hanger-outters) but I admit I dislike cultural Mormonism. It's creates the illusion that you can be a camp follower and still get the best of everything.

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No she's not. She's rejected Mormonism outright but  thinks she has a good idea, based on the findings of the study she cites, to create some sort of modern, secular, non-religious version of a "faith community" (there's an oxymoron, if there ever was one!) as a viable substitute for a genuine faith community based on a belief in Cod and His laws. Problem is what does one use as a substitute for God in this sort of pseudo faith community? What could possibly be an adequate substitute for a just, merciful, omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent and all loving God. I know some have started earthbound religions that attempt to substitute atheistic tyrants for God, but these secular cults don't seem to pan out too well. 

Do you recall the TV series "Cheers" with Ted Danson?  Well, for many people, the place to go to get some sort of religion is the local bar or pub where everybody knows your name, and where you can find some sympathy, and maybe even "hook-up."  You still have to pay your tithing, for the booze or soda (you don't have to drink booze), and if somebody gets too drunk, you can do a good turn and make sure they get home safely.  A kind of community, if you will.

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Is it just me, or is the author of this article trying to eat her cake and have it too?

Yeh, she is, but cultural Mormons are O.K.  One of the nicest cultural Mormons was the late Sterling McMurrin.  He stated forthrightly that the Book of Mormon was not authentic, but he had wonderful things to say about Mormon culture.  He was always so genial about it too.  Once during a debate with Hugh NIbley he defended BYU against Nibley's attacks.  Talk about role reversal!!

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Do you recall the TV series "Cheers" with Ted Danson?  Well, for many people, the place to go to get some sort of religion is the local bar or pub where everybody knows your name, and where you can find some sympathy, and maybe even "hook-up."  You still have to pay your tithing, for the booze or soda (you don't have to drink booze), and if somebody gets too drunk, you can do a good turn and make sure they get home safely.  A kind of community, if you will.

 

Well then see if you can write to her, Robert, and tell her "problem solved." Encourage her to head to the local gin mill to partake of the convivial 'spirits' of brotherhood and sisterhood found within all the various bottles, cans and kegs stocked there; then all she has to do is make whiskey, vodka and wine the 'trinity' of her new quasi-religion. Finally, instruct her to make pretzels the 'host' and beer the 'libation' to be used in celebration of their communal love-fest and she's off and running with her nifty idea for a substitute LDS religion, a surefire way to 'inspire' and minister 'peace' to all who attend.

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We are on a path of faith and we each fall along a very wide spectrum of degrees of faith. It matters not whether someone yet believes in Jesus Christ much less the Book of Mormon, Bible, etc. What is absolutely vital is do they want to know or seek after truth.  If they do the door is open wide.  It matters not if they have no moral compass, life is in a shambles, the invitation is clear, Come and listen to the world of the Lord and be healed of all thy wounds.

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We are on a path of faith and we each fall along a very wide spectrum of degrees of faith. It matters not whether someone yet believes in Jesus Christ much less the Book of Mormon, Bible, etc. What is absolutely vital is do they want to know or seek after truth. If they do the door is open wide. It matters not if they have no moral compass, life is in a shambles, the invitation is clear, Come and listen to the world of the Lord and be healed of all thy wounds.

Much needed post, thank you.
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Scriptures regarding lukewarmness (and similar injunctions) notwithstanding, I prefer that someone find value in the Church and the Gospel of Jesus Christ, even if that value is limited to social benefits and solid moral teachings, as opposed to believing that the Church is God's Kingdom and that the Gospel is what saves humankind.  I'd rather they see the glass as being half-full rather than as completely empty.

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Well then see if you can write to her, Robert, and tell her "problem solved." Encourage her to head to the local gin mill to partake of the convivial 'spirits' of brotherhood and sisterhood found within all the various bottles, cans and kegs stocked there; then all she has to do is make whiskey, vodka and wine the 'trinity' of her new quasi-religion. Finally, instruct her to make pretzels the 'host' and beer the 'libation' to be used in celebration of their communal love-fest and she's off and running with her nifty idea for a substitute LDS religion, a surefire way to 'inspire' and minister 'peace' to all who attend.

I can see, Teddy, that you are unfamiliar with the tradition common in many cultures of social drinking as part of community activity.  Cops often have a bar they go to after a shift so that they can unwind with their buddies before they go home and take out their frustrations on the wife and kids.  English pubs are well known as a place of community refuge -- for the reasons I stated in post #10.  Not everyone is LDS, and many communities are unaware that there are non-drinking Mormons or Methodists in their midst.  You might try being  more understanding and compassionate toward those merely seeking a bit of friendly conviviality in their spare time.  Jesus, you may remember, was criticized for hanging out with drunks and other unseemly characters.

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I can see, Teddy, that you are unfamiliar with the tradition common in many cultures of social drinking as part of community activity.  Cops often have a bar they go to after a shift so that they can unwind with their buddies before they go home and take out their frustrations on the wife and kids.  English pubs are well known as a place of community refuge -- for the reasons I stated in post #10.  Not everyone is LDS, and many communities are unaware that there are non-drinking Mormons or Methodists in their midst.  You might try being  more understanding and compassionate toward those merely seeking a bit of friendly conviviality in their spare time.  Jesus, you may remember, was criticized for hanging out with drunks and other unseemly characters.

 

Now Robert, I'm well aware of the role bars, pubs and saloons play in many cultures. I don't come from Mars, you know (perhaps you think I do?). I was in a lighthearted mood and having some fun when I wrote that tongue-in-cheek response to your previous post. And speaking of that post, I also thought it was tongue-in-cheek as well. After all, it seems pretty silly to suggest bars and booze could ever be considered a reasonable substitute for the LDS religion. No?

Edited by teddyaware
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