Jump to content

Recommended Posts

My dad giving his response to my concerns was such a moment for me. With a knowing smile he said, “Seth, you’re being totally selfish. So I’m going to make this really simple: marriage isn’t for you. You don’t marry to make yourself happy, you marry to make someone else happy. More than that, your marriage isn’t for yourself, you’re marrying for a family. Not just for the in-laws and all of that nonsense, but for your future children. Who do you want to help you raise them? Who do you want to influence them? Marriage isn’t for you. It’s not about you. Marriage is about the person you married.”

 

http://sethadamsmith.com/2013/11/02/marriage-isnt-for-you/

 

Link to comment

Seth Adam Smith is also responsible (at least in part: Rick Satterfield is the Web master of the site on which this appears) for things such as this: http://www.ldschurchtemples.com/manti/video/

Link to comment

And, there are folk for whom Marriage is really NOT for them. There are Mormons, some well known that have not and will not marry, for various reasons. Heavenly Father loves them too.

 

"All good things come from God. Everything that he does is 

to help his children become like him—a god. He has said, 

Behold, this is my work and my glory—to bring to pass the 

immortality and eternal life of man (Moses 1:39) (Gospel

Principles, 1997). This is only possible with exaltation.  

 

Those who purposely remain single and encourage others

to do the same are against God's work.

 

Gail

Link to comment

[Those who purposely remain single and encourage others

to do the same are against God's work.

 

Gail

Maybe, but I am reasonably sure that there is room for singles in God's plan. There are currently a huge number of singles on the other side as a large proportion died without marriage. And for those who did marry for time, their marriage is dissolved upon death so they are single also. Then there are those who married and found it to be a singularly painful experience.
Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Similar Content

    • By Maestrophil
      So I have shared before that of all my 6 kids, we have 4 that want nothing to do with the church, one that has been sealed in the temple, but seem to struggle with activity, WOW, garments, etc. and one couple that talks as if they have a testimony, but have never chosen to attend the temple, or church since being married.  
      This weekend, I had the good fortune to spend time with all my kids and have some good conversations.  My DIL, who is the wife in the last couple I mentioned was talking about how she has a 'strong testimony the gospel is true' but doesn't like the 'culture'.  I mentioned we all struggle with various aspects of the culture, and then felt to ask her if they ever saw themselves choosing to be sealed int he temple.  She said she didn't think so - when I asked why, she said it was because she "doesn't feel bad about having chosen to live with André (my son) before they were married."  She said she feels that was the right choice for them, and that because of this, she doesn't think she would be able to get a recommend.  
      I know that they are faithful to each other, so chastity is not a current issue, but it got me to thinking - how would a bishop respond if such a young woman came in asking for a recommend, admitted that she lived with her husband before they married, but have now been married for a few years.  Would the issue of regret come up if she didn't bring it up?  What if it did and she said she didn't regret the choice?  I'm glad I am not a bishop. 😉  Of course, I know the mantle and the spirit are with bishops so they are fit for the task.
      So, is there any advice I could or should offer my son and DIL?  Should I not follow up on the conversation at all?  It's hard with adult kids to know where to draw the line between being a parent and giving them a wide enough birth to be free-agents and adults.  
       
       
    • By latterdaytemplar
      I was recently interviewed by Saints Unscripted to address doubts that some Latter-day Saints may have regarding Freemasonry and the influence that it has historically had on the Church, as well as a description of what Masonry is. I thought that I would share it here.
      Not in the Interview
      One reason for joining Freemasonry that was not mentioned in the interview is that I had heard rumors concerning Joseph Smith stealing Masonic ceremonies and passing them off as revelation; with doubts growing, I decided to become a Mason for myself to see if those rumors were true. My doubts on this matter were resolved and my faith strengthened due to the information presented in this interview. In essence, I have come to the conclusion that Joseph Smith adopted the Masonic teaching model (concepts of theatrical presentation, of physical gestures for tokens, of illustrative symbols, etc.) and adapted it to teach the Church's already-existing, unique doctrine and to make covenants with God.
       
       
    • By Maestrophil
      Hi all.
       
      My wife and I have been reading in Ezekiel and have come to the part about the temple that is to be build in Jerusalem at the second coming.  Ezekiel gives great detail about the dimensions and layout of the temple, which is very unlike what current temples are, and much like the temples of old.  He also describes what will be done in tis temple - and much of it is animal sacrifice and offerings etc.
      My question is - how does this square with the idea that the temple is to be built by Jews who have accepted Jesus (and presumably joined the church) at his second coming?  Why would animal sacrifice be practiced there at all?  I have looked a bit online, and can't seem to find anything talking about this. 
      Thanks!
      MP
       
    • By nuclearfuels
      The ask: specifically, what goes into redrawing boundaries, other than prayer?
      Seems like critical mass of ward members and balancing of welfare needs, primarily. 
      Remember, good information leads to good inspiration. Though high school boundaries (and thus non-online seminary classes) don't' seem to be a consideration.  My son will be starting seminary in a class that has  no other youth from our ward in it, due to high school boundaries.
      -
      Friends of mine in the Greater Denver area recently had their ward and stake dissolved/absorbed by the three neighboring stakes.
      The ward they'd attended for 40 years or so had a lot of welfare needs / bishop's storehouse needs (majority of the cases in the stake were from that ward) and had a large group of inactive and less active members - example: some active members had 10-15 hometeaching families / ministering families. For clarity, I'll call this the "needy ward."
      No exceptions were made to those who requested to attend the ward that had the majority of "needy ward" members in it.
      Temple recommends were going to not be issued if members continued attending the ward which absorbed most of the "needy ward" members.
      My friends are now in a predominantly suburban ward with much less welfare need and more balance - though in their older age, the loss of existing social relationships is difficult.
      -
      A long time ago in a farming community in Utah, my family and I were in three wards in 2 years while never moving.
      Some said it was the high count of Primary age kids that caused the boundary update.
      Some said it was the higher welfare needs of part of the neighborhood that needed to be balanced amongst wards.
      Either way, as a newly-wed couple, starting out and having known some of the people in the area from high school, loosing these relationships was challenging.
      And, yes, my friends in Denver and in the farming area are able to remain friends and see each other; the challenge arises in finding the time after the kids, callings, commute, work, date night, FHE, etc.
       
    • By nuclearfuels
      Kenya legalized polygamy in 2014.  Any readers here serve mission there and have to tell investigators they'd need to stop the practice before being able to be baptized? I understand in Latin America a lot of married people split up but forgo the legal part of making the divorce official and that has to be done before they can be baptized.
      Germany is trying to indirectly legalize polygamy for one of their migrant culture's beliefs. 
      My wife and I support our ancestors who practiced polygamy, to say nothing of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob practicing polygamy.
      Curious as to your thoughts:
      Will other African countries and European countries following suit? Will / Should people in Congress - Ilhan, Tlaib, Romney, Bishop, etc. allow migrants here to practice what their faith encourages?  Declining populations (Japan, Europe) really have two options: welcome in higher fertility populations from other countries or legalize polygamy. 
       
      Pushed by politicians, polygamy enjoys a heyday among Christians in ...
      Germany: Citizenship for Polygamous Migrants?  
×
×
  • Create New...