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Mongolia And Mormons...


Calm

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Interesting article tidbit:

 

As the population of Mongolia approaches three million, the number of native Latter-day Saints surpasses four thousand. The Mongolian ambassador to the U.S. recently quipped that Mongolia is "'99% Buddhist and 1% Mormon.'" Though his calculation was off by a decimal point (the figure is closer to 0.1%), the comment is telling. Remarkably, the Church is reportedly the largest Christian denomination in Mongolia. Latter-day Saints are "among the most active" foreign missionaries in Mongolia, noted Associated Press writer Michael Kohn, who quoted one convert, a former Buddhist nun named Ankhtuya, as saying, "Mongolia should become a Mormon country." Paul Hyer, professor of Asian Studies at Brigham Young University, in 1998 said, "The development of the Church in Mongolia is nothing less than miraculous."

 

https://byustudies.byu.edu/dailyfeature.aspx?feature=465

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We have an Elder from Mongolia serving in our ward right now.

 

If it's not too personal, may I ask where?  I have a Mongolian exchange student right now. 16 years old. He's like an older brother to our younger children as they miss their real brother who is serving a mission.

 

The Soviets quashed the Buddhists back in the day so he and his family are not religious (his parents were Buddhists when they were young), yet he has these curious beliefs about life that smack of religion.  He comes to Church and Young Men's with us and enjoys the hymns.  The LDS Church lists two chapels in his town (in the central industrial corridor north of Ulaanbaatar) and when the time comes, I will show him.  One of those chapels is next to where his mother works.

 

We had him over for dinner and apparently Mongolians are not fond of squash

 

Their diet is mostly meat.  Some veggies (oriental mix) and rice of course.  He says there is way too much sugar here and they also seem to prefer the blander foods and not much salt.  Milk is good and he loves bananas.

 

His parents sent with him a gift of fine Mongolian Vodka in a very nice decorative bottle.  We emptied the bottle (into the sink) and the bottle and case now decorate our kitchen.  He also brought us some really nice cashmere.

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Paul Hyer, professor of Asian Studies at Brigham Young University, in 1998 said, "The development of the Church in Mongolia is nothing less than miraculous."

 

It may become another Tonga or Samoa.

 

I had a quick opportunity to speak with Elder L. Tom Perry when he visited our stake.  Being bold and brash, I blurted out that the church may gain a foothold in mainland China by opening a mission in Tibet.

 

"Tibet?!"  his voice boomed.

 

He then rushed out of the restroom back to the chapel.

 

Remember, you heard it here first.

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When we lived in Kansas and went to the Winter Quarters Temple Open house, we were startled to meet a Sister from Mongolia.  And then fairly soon after that, we had another sister from Ulaan Bataar serve in our ward.  Sister Narabayar.  She said that she just asked the missionaries why they were so happy.

 

Kevin Christensen

Bethel Park, PA

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We had a Chinese immigrant family (the wife spoke no English) that told the missionaries when they tracted them and connected themselves with us, that they (the family) wanted to know what made us 'glow'.  We had lessons at our house for awhile and we had to start from scratch, they had never heard of even the basic Bible stories like Noah's ark.  The wife continued to be interested, but the husband worked on Sunday and was all about making money so he lost interest pretty soon.  I don't know if the wife ever did get baptized, they had some family issues that got really complicated shortly before we left and I have no clue how they worked out.

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It may become another Tonga or Samoa.

 

I had a quick opportunity to speak with Elder L. Tom Perry when he visited our stake.  Being bold and brash, I blurted out that the church may gain a foothold in mainland China by opening a mission in Tibet.

 

"Tibet?!"  his voice boomed.

 

He then rushed out of the restroom back to the chapel.

 

Remember, you heard it here first.

 

Oh, that will go well, I am sure.  I am reminded how the Dalai Lama has to do his Lama-ing in India because the Red Chinese suppress religion and have been real pigs in Lhasa trying to destroy the local religion.  And you think they're going to let the Mormons, of all people, come waltzing in there to proselyte?  Dream on.

 

On the other hand, maybe they would let the Mormons come in as part of their program to destroy Buddhism in Tibet.  There is this note in Wikipedia on this very subject:

 

 

Proselytising has been illegal in China since 1949. But as of 2013, many Christian missionaries were reported to be active in Tibet with the tacit approval of Chinese authorities, who view the missionaries as a counterforce to Tibetan Buddhism or as a boon to the local economy.

 

So maybe you have a point, after all.

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Yep, I watched a documentary on Tibet and the Chinese, and they have a real problem with the opposition of the Buddahist monks.  Considering that Mormons have been very law-abiding, it would seem to open a window for our missionaries there.

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Sitting in class wearing my Mormon Dude tee shirt (has the look of the Mountain Dew logo) and a big Chinese guy asks if I was Mormon, I said yes and he smiled and said he is too, turns out he is Mongolian and a very nice guy. I invited him to church.

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My expectations, I think, are out of this world.  In college, which translates to about 1998, I had met many young Mongolians who were LDS.  It was cool.  I was way excited and heard about the church just killing it there.  But to hear that we're merely .1% of the population, which is half of what we represent worldwide, in such a relatively tiny country doesn't say much.  In theory 4,000 people joining the church could happen in a year's time.  Why are such minimal gains so exalted? 

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My expectations, I think, are out of this world.  In college, which translates to about 1998, I had met many young Mongolians who were LDS.  It was cool.  I was way excited and heard about the church just killing it there.  But to hear that we're merely .1% of the population, which is half of what we represent worldwide, in such a relatively tiny country doesn't say much.  In theory 4,000 people joining the church could happen in a year's time.  Why are such minimal gains so exalted? 

 

4000 in one year? You do have expectations that are out of this world. Especially when we are starting from scratch.

 

However, I do think it's completely doable. Perhaps if we ask the Lord, He will double the number of members in Mongolia in 2014. Or perhaps we could ask Him for even more.

 

Though honestly, considering it's a non-Christian country, I think the fact that we have converts is a miracle. Heck, the fact that we have any converts with 18 and 19 year olds teaching people is a miracle.

 

 

 

Hec

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