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Absurd News Item For Byu...


Calm

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http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/blogsfaithblog/56975397-180/church-jenkins-byu-caffeinated.html.csp

 

I cannot imagine how anyone even remotely thinks that an accidental misstocking of a vending machine is news...maybe if it included poisonous items, but simply the difference between caffeinated and uncaffeinated soda?

 

Really, Trib?  Are you that desperate for news fillers that anything will do?  Or is it an attempt to make BYU look weird...not disagreeing with that, but is it news?

 

In case anyone misses the point...this post is not about the misstocking...it is about the choices being made these days about what is news...

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Where oh where did the infallibility go?

Sigh!  If only President Monson had been the one stocking the vending machine! ;)

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Oh My the Church is doomed but not nearly so much as journalism at the Trib.

What it have learned lately is that most journalists are activists. They are not acutally journalists. Journalism is largely dead and most do such a piss poor job. It really is pathetic. They are more interested in a narriative and spin then what actually is going on. This is not news in any sense. And only those that hate the church would even care. 

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http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/blogsfaithblog/56975397-180/church-jenkins-byu-caffeinated.html.csp

 

I cannot imagine how anyone even remotely thinks that an accidental misstocking of a vending machine is news...maybe if it included poisonous items, but simply the difference between caffeinated and uncaffeinated soda?

 

Really, Trib?  Are you that desperate for news fillers that anything will do?  Or is it an attempt to make BYU look weird...not disagreeing with that, but is it news?

 

In case anyone misses the point...this post is not about the misstocking...it is about the choices being made these days about what is news...

We probably owe much of this to journalism school graduates, who know more about how to ornament and embroider their stories than about how to deal with substantive issues (which requires real research).  If, instead of journalism degrees, they obtained degrees in hard academic subjects (like political science, history, philosophy, or the sciences), they would be better prepared for the real world, and good old fashioned print-journalism.

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I'm drinking Diet Coke. I think it interesting that the Joseph Smith building serves caffienated beverages. Seriously when I was a student I probably would have been better off having the Coke or Pepsi than buying the pills that kept you awake and made you totally jittery and unable to function the next day.

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We probably owe much of this to journalism school graduates, who know more about how to ornament and embroider their stories than about how to deal with substantive issues (which requires real research).  If, instead of journalism degrees, they obtained degrees in hard academic subjects (like political science, history, philosophy, or the sciences), they would be better prepared for the real world, and good old fashioned print-journalism.

 

The twenty four hour news cycle pretty much killed print news. Now it is just infotainment when they're not just making it up.

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 "Peggy Fletcher Stack has been producing stories for The Salt Lake Tribune's award-winning Faith section for nearly two decades. Writing about contemporary faith, rituals, and spirituality as well as religion's conflicts and cohesion has always been Stack's passion."

 

 

"Unfortunately for them, this week’s vending-machine episode did not signal a new openness."

 

This is from an award winning journalist.

 

The Trib is truly a rag. 

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Had the machine been stocked with a good IPA beer, i would have reconsidered BYU as a serious option for school. But they don't have an international law program that I want.

I'd also like to point out that the U did what the Y couldn't do. Beat and knock out Stanford! God wins again!!

 

One of the failed social experiments of the late 60's and early 70's was idea that if you were old enough to go to war. You were old enough the drink booze. It didn't work out well at all, and nearly all states have raised the legal drinking age back to 21. Putting a booze vending machine on any college campus would be a disaster.

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Jenkins explained last year that BYU’s shunning of those drinks is "not a university or church decision, but made by dining services, based on what our customers want."


 


There has not "been a demand for it," Jenkins said in September 2012. "We are constantly evaluating what those needs and desires are."


 


Considering the alleged "run" on the machines once students found out they were stocked with caffeinated beverages, maybe it's time to reevaluate those needs and desires.


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One of the failed social experiments of the late 60's and early 70's was idea that if you were old enough to go to war. You were old enough the drink booze. It didn't work out well at all, and nearly all states have raised the legal drinking age back to 21. Putting a booze vending machine on any college campus would be a disaster.

 

It's true that many states lowered their drinking age in response to the 26th Amendment (or for the same rationale).

 

States raised it in varying degrees to 21, whether it had always been lower or whether it had only recently been lowered, in response to federal legislation to the effect that any state with a drinking age belowe 21 would lose a certain portion of federal transportation funds.  While there was some correlation between a lower drinking age and increased accidents resulting from intoxicated drivers, most of the drive for the new federal legislation was a result of hightened publicity and political movements against drunk driving.  I don't think it can simply be said that a lower drinking age was a failed experiment.

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It's true that many states lowered their drinking age in response to the 26th Amendment (or for the same rationale).

 

States raised it in varying degrees to 21, whether it had always been lower or whether it had only recently been lowered, in response to federal legislation to the effect that any state with a drinking age belowe 21 would lose a certain portion of federal transportation funds.  While there was some correlation between a lower drinking age and increased accidents resulting from intoxicated drivers, most of the drive for the new federal legislation was a result of hightened publicity and political movements against drunk driving.  I don't think it can simply be said that a lower drinking age was a failed experiment.

 

True it was part of a package, but the impetus was the untimely deaths of young adults. MADD didn't exist until the 1980's.

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One of the failed social experiments of the late 60's and early 70's was idea that if you were old enough to go to war. You were old enough the drink booze. It didn't work out well at all, and nearly all states have raised the legal drinking age back to 21. Putting a booze vending machine on any college campus would be a disaster.

 

I had heard about that in passing a few times actually.

 

OTOH, it has become quite the disaster to have men and women on the same campus. All the nonsense of dating, marriage, baby making, etc...all just a bunch of unneccessary expenses.

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http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/blogsfaithblog/56975397-180/church-jenkins-byu-caffeinated.html.csp

 

I cannot imagine how anyone even remotely thinks that an accidental misstocking of a vending machine is news...maybe if it included poisonous items, but simply the difference between caffeinated and uncaffeinated soda?

 

Really, Trib?  Are you that desperate for news fillers that anything will do?  Or is it an attempt to make BYU look weird...not disagreeing with that, but is it news?

 

In case anyone misses the point...this post is not about the misstocking...it is about the choices being made these days about what is news...

I think it pertinent to point out that this is not -- nor do I believe it is it intended to be -- a news story in the conventional sense. It appears to be a blog post, comparable to a newspaper column of yesteryear, wherein the columnist, or in this case, the blogger, focuses in on something as grist for commentary that may or may not merit news coverage elsewhere in the same publication.

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