Jump to content

Study: Children In Families Led By Same-Sex Couples Less Apt To Graduate


Scott Lloyd

Recommended Posts

The study adds to the extant body of knowledge that the homosexual lifestyle is fraught with significant additional risk factors (and therefore ought not to be benefited by the state or advanced as a valid vehicle for raising children) .  What's promising is that while it's been difficult to publish these kinds of results for about a decade now because of political incorrectness, we may be seeing a reversal of that trend.

 

 

Deseret serves the equal and opposite audience that the SL Trib does. Its integrity on issues such as these tend to mirror rational and reasonable information as provided by a gossip rag. This is not meant to be a Godwin's Law violation. But it is clear that DN has its agenda to perpetuate and prejudices to maintain. Typical media reporting.

 

 

Deseret serves the equal and opposite audience that the SL Trib does. Its integrity on issues such as these tend to mirror rational and reasonable information as provided by a gossip rag. This is not meant to be a Godwin's Law violation. But it is clear that DN has its agenda to perpetuate and prejudices to maintain. Typical media reporting.

 

 

My my!  The sour-grapes, kill-the-messenger mentality is palpable here.

 

Sorry to have ruined your day by citing a news story, guys.

When a study comes out that is completely opposite of hundreds of other studies, anyone should get suspicious no matter what their personal views are.  What the Desert News failed to mention is that the author of the study is a well known anti gay activists and sits on the board of directors of the National Orgainzation for Marriage, argueably the most anti gay marriage organization in the country.  Here is the other half of the story that the Desert News felt unnessary to report.  

 

Douglas Allen is an anti-gay bigot who sits on the National Organization For Marriage‘s-linked Ruth Institute Board of Advisors and is one of its “inner circle of experts.”

In a recent commentary published in the journal Demography, Allen alleges to have re-analyzed a study by Michael Rosenfeld showing that children of gay parents do as well in school as children of heterosexual parents.

Whereas Rosenfeld — using data from the 2000 Census — took pains to compare “apples with apples” — Allen pulls a Regnerus, lumping children of gay parents into one group and comparing them to children of married heterosexual parents, to say that: “Compared with traditional married households, we find that children being raised by same-sex couples are 35% less likely to make normal progress through school.”

I asked Gary Gates, Ph.D. of UCLA’s Williams Institute for his remarks on the Allen commentary:

“One challenge with both of these papers is that, according to Census Bureau estimates, 40% of the reported same-sex couples in the 2000 Census were likely different-sex married couples who miscoded the sex of one of the spouses and appeared to be same-sex couples.”  (See here for the Census’s own report on the errors). Gates continues: “Given that the bulk of these errors are among different-sex married couples who are substantially more likely to have children than same-sex couples, we now can assume that a substantial majority of the reported same-sex couples with children in the Census 2000 Public Use Microdata samples are likely different-sex couples with children. Official acknowledgement of this problem came after the Rosenfeld paper was published. There is a way to adjust the data to minimize this substantial error and Rosenfeld does report that the adjustment does not substantially change his conclusions. However, he ultimately reports on findings from unadjusted data (remember, the Census Bureau had not confirmed the extent of the problem when Rosenfeld published his paper). This new commentary does not address the issue at all. Without adjusting the data for this now well-documented measurement error, it is very difficult to determine how much this problem might impact the new analysis.” [bolding added]

Asked via e-mail why his commentary did not address these issues, Allen refused to provide a direct explanation. “My guess is that over the past 2 years you never sent an e-mail like this to Rosenfeld asking why he would publish a paper using the 2000 census,” he said. Allen also said that I “miss the point entirely,” as though it were of no meaningful consequence to his commentary that in the data he used, the majority of students said to have gay parents actually had heterosexual parents.

Buried in his dense commentary, Allen confesses this: “we are unable to reject the hypothesis that there is no difference.”

Despite that fact, Allen told gay-bashing lies about his commentary in a pre-publication podcast with the Ruth Institute’s Jennifer Roback Morse. At the 14:15 mark of the podcast, Morse asks Allen if the “35% increase likelihood” of failing a year in school is “due to just the gayness,” with other variables — such as poverty — coming on top of “just the gayness.”

Allen tells her that is correct.

However, that is not what his commentary says.  Allen’s commentary does not at all demonstrate causation between having gay parents and dropping out, so the phrase “due to just the gayness” is plain wrong. Allen’s commentary also does not find that gay parents’ children have a likelihood of higher than 35% of being held back a year, so Morse’s statement that other variables, such as poverty, come on top of “just the gayness” creates a false impression, a false impression which Allen irresponsibly reinforces to the Ruth Institute listenership.

Besides the Ruth Institute podcast, Allen’s commentary was first reported to the public by NOM’s William Duncan in thenotorious National Review, with Duncan’s report immediately cross-posted to the NOM blog.

Rosenfeld’s response to Allen — published in the same issue of Demography — contains a point-by-point take-down of this latest NOM-linked anti-gay pseudoscience junk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It appears the latest ploy to attack gay marriage by some is to try and contort a study that conforms to what they want to have happen.  I wouldn't mind that so much.  But if a newspaper is going to report a story, they should include the professional bias and retracted statements of the person doing the study.  

Link to comment

 

It appears the latest ploy to attack gay marriage by some is to try and contort a study that conforms to what they want to have happen.  I wouldn't mind that so much.  But if a newspaper is going to report a story, they should include the professional bias and retracted statements of the person doing the study.  

 

I would just like to point out that the study published in demographics is older, and uses U.S. census data, while this appears to be a new study. The quotes you posted, while no less valid in evaluating Allen's character, are not about the study talked about in Deseret Book's article.

 

Here is the abstract and the link to the more recent publication:

 

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-013-9220-y

 

Almost all studies of same-sex parenting have concluded there is “no difference” in a range of outcome measures for children who live in a household with same-sex parents compared to children living with married opposite-sex parents. Recently, some work based on the US census has suggested otherwise, but those studies have considerable drawbacks. Here, a 20 % sample of the 2006 Canada census is used to identify self-reported children living with same-sex parents, and to examine the association of household type with children’s high school graduation rates. This large random sample allows for control of parental marital status, distinguishes between gay and lesbian families, and is large enough to evaluate differences in gender between parents and children. Children living with gay and lesbian families in 2006 were about 65 % as likely to graduate compared to children living in opposite sex marriage families. Daughters of same-sex parents do considerably worse than sons.

Link to comment

Didn't ruin my day. What did ruffle my day was finding out that a prosecutor is contesting the validity of my German/American dual citizenship. Apparently, being born to American parents, one a former Army service member, having a social security number for 30 years but being born in a German hospital is grounds for possible deportation.

 

All three of my youngest sons were born in a German hospital, and all three are natural born citizens.  Of course, I was active duty US military at the time and their mother was a naturalized US citizen (German-born).

 

That is so weird that they would contest the validity of your US citizenship!  Or are they only in a kerfuffle over your dual citizenship?

Link to comment

 

 

Don't want to know enough to pay, but in case anyone runs across it I would love to know if they controlled for education and income level of parents, because if they didn't, since gays and lesbian parents are better educated and I believe tend to be higher income, the lower rates are even more dramatic.

 

 

I couldn't find the full article. But this article did give better descriptors of of limitations and strengths as a study. Apparently Gay parents were more likely to have higher levels of education and their children more likely to be enrolled in school. I found it interesting that how well a child did was also linked to not only to same/opposite sex relationship, but also whether the parents were the same gender as the child as well.  The limitations were what I was wondering they'd be: did not hold for household history of child or how the child was brought into the household (birth, adoption, surragate, etc). The article glossed over this a bit, feeling that the strengths far outweighed it ....I think those are definitely major limitations when trying to stating the conclusions being made by other articles like DN. I do think it gives a better overall survey of households as they really are, but not necessarily a great comparison line to heterosexual households considering there is more likely to be adoption, surrogacy, and fluid membership in these households that wasn't controlled for. 

 

That stated, the research itself does have merit in getting a better landscape of various households, their possible limitations, and their possible strengths. 

 

With luv,

BD

Link to comment

All three of my youngest sons were born in a German hospital, and all three are natural born citizens.  Of course, I was active duty US military at the time and their mother was a naturalized US citizen (German-born).

 

That is so weird that they would contest the validity of your US citizenship!  Or are they only in a kerfuffle over your dual citizenship?

This prosecutor is questioning my US citizenship.

Link to comment

This prosecutor is questioning my US citizenship.

 

He sounds clueless.

 

What is his legal basis for questioning it?  Can he cite federal statute that would call it into question?  Or is he just blowing smoke for the purpose of messing with you?

 

If a prosecutor is involved, this suggests you are involved in a legal case whose outcome the prosecutor believes can be influenced by your citizenship status, hence the questioning.  Presumably you have an attorney?  Does your attorney have any knowledge of citizenship law? 

 

I don't know if you are aware of the law regarding citizenship.  If you do, then ignore me, but here is a good starting point for your investigation:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthright_citizenship_in_the_United_States#Statute.2C_by_parentage

 

From your description of your birth and family situation, it seems pretty clear that you are probably a birthright citizen of the US.

 

And the prosecutor is being a jerk.

Link to comment

+1,000,000,000,000.00

 

Here's the problem.  The vast majority of newspapers in this country, along with the vast majority of broadcast news outlets, are almost exclusively strongly liberal, with nary a conservative permitted to darken their doors.  This condition, they are pleased to claim, is "mainstream".  The fact that about a third of the country is liberal, a third is conservative, and a third breaks either way, depending upon the topic, is a fact that they completely and wantonly disregard.  By claiming "mainstream" status, this allows them and their fellow liberals (only 1/3 of the country, remember) to make the bogus claim that outlets such as "Fox" are biased and unreliable, whereas they with their self-nominated "mainstream" status are neutral and unbiased, when nothing could be further from the truth.  The thing is, Fox isn't even a conservative-only bastion, because they actually have both sides well-represented on-staff.  In short, Fox is the only "balanced" news organization out there, while the rest merely claim that undeserved status. 

 

Once upon a time in this country, there were Democrat-leaning and Republican-leaning newspapers.  And everyone knew which were which.  Those were the days my friend.

 

Come on, let's see if we can get a good political discussion going on this subject before the mods hurry in and shut it down!

Link to comment

The problem of kids being born abroad to american citizens, without contemporaneous registration with the embassy as required by law, and then returning to the states and living their lives normally only to find that they are not lawfully citizens when then need some paperwork for some reason, is not as uncommon as you might think.   Of course if the birth was long ago enough, then proving you were born to a US citizen may be enough.   But for someone whose american parent is deceased, that can be hugely more troublesome.

 

And it comes as quite a shock.   (This is true of the  dream act babies who turn 18, believing they are citizens (so they don't do the things as a child which would make the whole process easier) because they had no idea their parents are illegals, too.)

Link to comment

Does anyone care that the University of Cambridge studied ability of parents to handle parenting demands, and the canadian study looked at graduation from high school?   The results even if undisputed on all sides, would not cancel out each other.

Link to comment

Didn't ruin my day. What did ruffle my day was finding out that a prosecutor is contesting the validity of my German/American dual citizenship. Apparently, being born to American parents, one a former Army service member, having a social security number for 30 years but being born in a German hospital is grounds for possible deportation.

If your father was in the military and you were born in another country, you are an American citizen. But America does not have or allow dual citizenship. So you will have to choose, Germany does allow dual citizenship, but you don't live there, just choose America and you will stay in America.
Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...