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Today's Earthquake In Pakistan Creates A New Island In The Arabian Sea.


Sevenbak

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I got the news about the earthquake at 4:51 this morning (texted by USGS), and when I saw it I thought that they got shaken pretty good down in So. Pakistan.  A report I saw said about 45 deaths as a result of the quake, and 30% of the houses in the district collapsed.

 

They live in a bad earthquake zone, and I wonder why they don't build better so their homes don't collapse?  I know it may have to do with materials available, and their poverty in that region, but surely somebody has figured out a better method of building with the materials easily available?

 

The island of Nehoristan is of course very nice, but I am sad for those who lost their lives, their homes and their loved ones.

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I got the news about the earthquake at 4:51 this morning (texted by USGS), and when I saw it I thought that they got shaken pretty good down in So. Pakistan.  A report I saw said about 45 deaths as a result of the quake, and 30% of the houses in the district collapsed.

 

They live in a bad earthquake zone, and I wonder why they don't build better so their homes don't collapse?  I know it may have to do with materials available, and their poverty in that region, but surely somebody has figured out a better method of building with the materials easily available?

 

The island of Nehoristan is of course very nice, but I am sad for those who lost their lives, their homes and their loved ones.

As I hear it, the plates in that region are shattering and some really huge quakes are expected.

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As I hear it, the plates in that region are shattering and some really huge quakes are expected.

 

Wow, sounds like fun then!  Too bad I have dentist appointment that day.

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They live in a bad earthquake zone, and I wonder why they don't build better so their homes don't collapse?

If I ever lived on the beach, or on a fault line I would build a junker house - so when it was destroyed, it would be no big loss....  at least, if you are not rich (or the natural disaster potential too large to combat) why not be content with disposable housing?  Just so you can get out of it before it collapses of coarse. 

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Having lived and traveled in countries and areas as poor as the one in the story I find some of the comments in this thread in pretty bad taste.

 

Why don't they build quake-resistant houses? Because they're so poor they are lucky if they can tie a few sheets of corrugated iron together. As for a "junker" house being "no big loss" - when it's the only house you have it is a complete and utter loss.

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Having lived and traveled in countries and areas as poor as the one in the story I find some of the comments in this thread in pretty bad taste.

 

Why don't they build quake-resistant houses? Because they're so poor they are lucky if they can tie a few sheets of corrugated iron together. As for a "junker" house being "no big loss" - when it's the only house you have it is a complete and utter loss.

 

A complete and utter loss would be the loss of lives, not of a house. 

Chck this out:

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&va=styrofoam+house

Styrophoam homes - they are cheap, well insulated, cool looking structures AND they don't kill you when they fall down.  I think disposable homes that are created to gently fall down (and then you rebuild them after the catastrophie) is a perfectly good solution. 

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Think about how we currectly design cars - cars are designed to be disposable in the case of an accident - they crumple and protect the people inside - homes in risk areas should be built like we build cars - with the understanding that the house will be destroyed, but the people inside would be safe. 

My engineering class is starting their big semester gorup project today - I think I'm going to suggest "designing safe disposable homes" as one of the group projects. 

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Mud bricks are the material of choice in many poor countries. It is cheap , environmentally green(brown), and quite durable. Problem is ,it is not stable in an earthquake and is very heavy. 1000s have died in Central America being crushed by toppling walls. I suggest an inner framework similar to the roll cage in race cars that can be used to protect say 6 people in an emergency.

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A complete and utter loss would be the loss of lives, not of a house. 

Chck this out:

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&va=styrofoam+house

Styrophoam homes - they are cheap, well insulated, cool looking structures AND they don't kill you when they fall down.  I think disposable homes that are created to gently fall down (and then you rebuild them after the catastrophie) is a perfectly good solution. 

 

Styrophoam isn't cheap in third world countries, and unless it too is protected(covered) readily degrades. Earthquakes themselves don't kill many people. It is the things that fall on people that kills them. IE; In an earthquake stay away from glass.

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I got the news about the earthquake at 4:51 this morning (texted by USGS), and when I saw it I thought that they got shaken pretty good down in So. Pakistan.  A report I saw said about 45 deaths as a result of the quake, and 30% of the houses in the district collapsed.

 

They live in a bad earthquake zone, and I wonder why they don't build better so their homes don't collapse?  I know it may have to do with materials available, and their poverty in that region, but surely somebody has figured out a better method of building with the materials easily available?

 

The island of Nehoristan is of course very nice, but I am sad for those who lost their lives, their homes and their loved ones.

 

You may never get your own planet, but at least you got your own island.

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Styrophoam isn't cheap in third world countries, and unless it too is protected(covered) readily degrades. Earthquakes themselves don't kill many people. It is the things that fall on people that kills them. IE; In an earthquake stay away from glass.

 

Hence, "drop, cover, and hold."  If you are inside, you are generally much safer staying inside until the shaking stops.  Many serious injuries and even deaths ocur during earthquakes when people fall, or are struck by falling debris as they are trying to run out of the building.

 

BTW, in CA, we are having our statewide "great shakeout" exercise on Oct 17th. 

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Having lived and traveled in countries and areas as poor as the one in the story I find some of the comments in this thread in pretty bad taste.

 

Why don't they build quake-resistant houses? Because they're so poor they are lucky if they can tie a few sheets of corrugated iron together. As for a "junker" house being "no big loss" - when it's the only house you have it is a complete and utter loss.

 

Canard, I was not talking about what you seem to think I was.  I was talking about affordable, appropriate technology.  I imagine that wood is somewhat scarce in that part of Pakistan, but still, there are methods of construction with stone and brick that are more quake-resistant than others.  It seems that there must be someone who could have experimented with different techniques to make these structures more survivable?  If not the people in Pakistan than why not someone else, somewhere else?  The Gates Foundation has been working on ways to fight malaria, ways that can be applied affordably by those living in infected areas, so why couldn't somebody research simple and affordable ways to build earthquake resistant residences out of materials commonly available where they are needed?

 

After thousands of years of this, you'd think someone would think of something!  Especially with all the engineering expertise that is now available.

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You may never get your own planet, but at least you got your own island.

 

Apparently, new islands like this are not uncommon after earthquakes, and they get worn away after a few months, so I won't have long to enjoy it.

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