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Episcopal Bishop Takes A Stand Against Anti-Mormon Humor


Scott Lloyd

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This appeared a couple of days ago, but I've not yet seen anything about it on the board, so I thought I would post a link.

 

Kudos to the Rt. Rev. Scott B. Hayashi for his courage.

 

Here's a quote I particularly like:

 

“We have lived in Utah for nearly 12 years, including eight and a half years in Ogden as rector of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, and three years here as bishop,” he said. “During that time, we have both had such wonderful experiences with people who are members of the LDS Church. And Amy said, ‘It’s just not fair that people say such terrible things about Mormons, especially when many of those who say them don’t know what they are talking about.’”

 

Reaction, both formal and informal, from our people to the "Book of Mormon" musical on Broadway and other such potential provocations has been restrained, and that is wise and proper. But I don't feel we are obliged altogether to acquiesce to such obvious societal hypocrisy when a similar thing against other religious or ethnic groups would not be tolerated, much less celebrated and applauded.

 

For the record, I, as a Latter-day Saint, share Bishop Hayashi's sentiment as it pertains to religious faiths other than my own.

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Anti-Mormonism, it sometimes seems, is the last acceptable societal prejudice. :huh::unknw:

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Anti-Mormonism, it sometimes seems, is the last acceptable societal prejudice. :huh::unknw:

Oh I think there is plenty of bigotry going around.  Prejudice against Mormons is not the last acceptable societal prejudice unfortunately.

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This appeared a couple of days ago, but I've not yet seen anything about it on the board, so I thought I would post a link.

 

Kudos to the Rt. Rev. Scott B. Hayashi for his courage.

 

Here's a quote I particularly like:

 

Reaction, both formal and informal, from our people to the "Book of Mormon" musical on Broadway and other such potential provocations has been restrained, and that is wise and proper. But I don't feel we are obliged altogether to acquiesce to such obvious societal hypocrisy when a similar thing against other religious or ethnic groups would not be tolerated, much less celebrated and applauded.

 

For the record, I, as a Latter-day Saint, share Bishop Hayashi's sentiment as it pertains to religious faiths other than my own.

Perhaps it is because I was raised a Catholic that I find Catholics to be very friendly and tolerant of our beliefs.  I work with several chaplaincies and all of them are more concerned with my actions and character than what people tell "what we are".

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Anti-Mormonism, it sometimes seems, is the last acceptable societal prejudice. :huh::unknw:

It would be nice if that was so, but there are a lot of acceptable prejudices from what I've seen though they vary depending on what group you belong to.  Every group I've known seems to have at least one or two (though not all members of the group have them and the strength of such prejudices varies a lot as well.

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Perhaps it is because I was raised a Catholic that I find Catholics to be very friendly and tolerant of our beliefs. 

I wasn't and my experience has been the same.

 

As to the OP, Bishop Hayashi is a good and kind man.

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I am not sure there is any value in valuing which kind of prejudice is more offensive. Those that affect the oneself are often the ones most hurtful, but that is only because It is personal. It is better if we could see all prejudice with open clear eyes. It is not easy.

Well observed and said.

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Perhaps it is because I was raised a Catholic that I find Catholics to be very friendly and tolerant of our beliefs. I work with several chaplaincies and all of them are more concerned with my actions and character than what people tell "what we are".

I agree with you. I have heard kind things indeed about us from Catholic sources.

It's nice, in this instance to see it coming from an Episcopalian.

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I am not sure there is any value in valuing which kind of prejudice is more offensive. Those that affect the oneself are often the ones most hurtful, but that is only because It is personal. It is better if we could see all prejudice with open clear eyes. It is not easy.

 

It is the difference between like and like; like and unlike. Christian on Christian fighting betrays Christlike behavior.

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