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Questions For Volgadon!


Stargazer

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I was trying to communicate with the only person I know of who speaks Russian, but he didn't get back with me without contact information after saying he might do so, so I am going to ask this here, and hope that he does see it! 

 

My late mother-in-law's story of her captivity in the Soviet Union as a German civilian forced laborer after WW2 contains a number of words which are apparently Russian, but for which I cannot find any confirmation (some of them I can find, but these others are giving me trouble). The original text is a transcription in German from an audio recording.

  • A word commanding "to stop". In her description she gives "Stoy!" as a command from the Russian soldier who captured her. Bing Translater says "stop!" is "стоп!" which of course transliterates to "stop!" Is there some word, "stoy", which answers to what she remembers hearing?
  • A word that seems to sound like "yest", used in demanding one to show personal documents. This word in the exchange that she describes sounds like "yest", and occurs with the word in German and Russian for "document" ("документы" or "Dokumente")
  • A word for an article of winter clothing, a quilted jacket. The word she uses is "kupeikas", which I cannot find anywhere. In her tale, the clothing item is using in connection with the felt boots, valenki or Валенки.

Sorry for using this as the medium of communication!

 

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.

  • [*]A word commanding "to stop". In her description she gives "Stoy!" as a command from the Russian soldier who captured her. Bing Translater says "stop!" is "стоп!" which of course transliterates to "stop!" Is there some word, "stoy", which answers to what she remembers hearing?
http://learnrussian.rt.com/speak-russian/how-say-stop-russian

"Stoy" is "stop" in Russian

Watch the video at the bottom for how to say it for sure, rhymes with "toy"

Edited by calmoriah
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For "yest" maybe:

The sound s is written c.

If the link disappears again, the word is yhect_ with the last space there a backwards N, which is pronounced like the e in me according to wiki...I am heartbroken I didn't remember, but it has been 18 years and I was never that good even at reciting the alphabet.

Looks like the link won't work...it is defined as to take away, to carry off or to claim.

Edited by calmoriah
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http://www.reverso.net/text_translation.aspx?lang=EN

This looks to be a good translator as it provides variations...can't give you a direct link to the word as russian text makes it disappear here. However just type in the word in Russian in the alphabet given, the letter that looks like a little b is near the end, not at the beginning. C is where s would be in English, right before t.

Edited by calmoriah
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Have no clue on the last one, hopefully Volgadon will know. If not, maybe it's time to track down our long lost Russian friend, Irina.

Another option might be calling the family history centre and seeing if they have a native Russian speaker who can listen and see if they recognise it...or perhaps the online missionary chat service...though you need a native speaker because it is unlikely to be in the vocabulary of a nonnative missionary.

Edited by calmoriah
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I was trying to communicate with the only person I know of who speaks Russian, but he didn't get back with me without contact information after saying he might do so, so I am going to ask this here, and hope that he does see it! 

 

My late mother-in-law's story of her captivity in the Soviet Union as a German civilian forced laborer after WW2 contains a number of words which are apparently Russian, but for which I cannot find any confirmation (some of them I can find, but these others are giving me trouble). The original text is a transcription in German from an audio recording.

  • A word commanding "to stop". In her description she gives "Stoy!" as a command from the Russian soldier who captured her. Bing Translater says "stop!" is "стоп!" which of course transliterates to "stop!" Is there some word, "stoy", which answers to what she remembers hearing?
  • A word that seems to sound like "yest", used in demanding one to show personal documents. This word in the exchange that she describes sounds like "yest", and occurs with the word in German and Russian for "document" ("документы" or "Dokumente")
  • A word for an article of winter clothing, a quilted jacket. The word she uses is "kupeikas", which I cannot find anywhere. In her tale, the clothing item is using in connection with the felt boots, valenki or Валенки.

Sorry for using this as the medium of communication!

 

 

 

 

I'm sorry for not getting back to you, I can be exceptionally absentminded at times.

 

Stoy is indeed correct. Second person singular imperative for stoyat, stand. Stop wasn't used as much in those years.

 

Calmoriah is also right about yest, to have. The question would be dokumenty yest (or, yest dokumenty)- do you have documents. This is a short, somewhat impatient way of asking.

 

Kupeika is a riddle. A coat can be kurtka or kurthocka, but the kind of quilted jacket worn in the Red Army is called a telogreyka. The word for penny is kopeyka, but what that would have to do with valenky is beyond me.

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do you have documents

 

It might help, though you may already know this, there are no definite articles in Russian, so there would be no word for "the" as we would say it in English.

 

As the video said when I reviewed this last night, it is one nice simple thing considering how complex Russian is otherwise.

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