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Oscar-Winner Writing Gay Mormon Tv Miniseries


Daniel2

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From the Huffington Post:

Dustin Lance Black Writing New Gay Rights Miniseries For ABC

Christopher RudolphThe Huffington PostAug 01, 2013

Dustin Lance Black, the Academy Award-winning screenwriter for "Milk," is set to write a semi-autobiographical eight hour miniseries for ABC, about his background in gay rights activism, and his Mormon upbringing.

Details on the miniseries are scarce, but according to The Hollywood Reporter it is currently in development at ABC Studios, and will be told from Black's perspective about his life growing up gay in a Mormon household to becoming a leader in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights movement.

This will actually be a return to the small screen for Black, who began his writing career on the HBO series "Big Love," which also dealt with Mormon life. In addition to writing feature films like "Milk," and "J. Edgar," (and making his directorial debut with "Virginia" starring Jennifer Connelly), Black also wrote the play "8" about the Prop 8 trial in California, which starred such celebrities as Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Jamie Lee Curtis.

Black is also currently working on an adaptation of Jon Krakauer's book Under the Banner of Heaven, which deals with a mass-murder within the Mormon church, as well as a forthcoming earthquake disaster movie with J.J. Abrams.

There is no word yet on when the miniseries will debut.

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:lazy:

(No offense, Daniel, but I seriously doubt this is going to be my cup of [herbal! ;) ] tea).

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Under the Banner of Heaven does NOT deal with mass murder within the LDS church. MMM is discussed of course but it is fairly brief. The main focus is on the history of the LDS church as well as a horrific murder of a mother and baby committed by the Lafferty brothers (who were not LDS but belonged to an offshoot fundamentalist Mormon group-not FLDS either) because they believed God told them to do it.

Krakauer tries to make the connection between violence and the LDS church, but since the MMM is pretty much the last violent thing the church, as an institution, can be blamed for, he had to go to fundamentalist Mormons to try to make the point.

Sorry, just had to clear that up!

As to the miniseries, hopefully it will be fair and accurate in it's portrayal of Mormonism. That's all we can really ask. Krakauer didn't do a great job in his book with being objective (something that I hate in a nonfiction writer, being a historian of sorts, because it makes it impossible to really trust that what they are presenting is actually true and not being able to trust your sources is extremely annoying), so hopefully Black is more trustworthy in that regard. I really have no idea who he is.

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Dustin Lance Black to pen new semi-autobiographical mini-series about gay rights, Mormonism for ABC: "Details on the miniseries are scarce, but according to The Hollywood Reporter it is currently in development at ABC Studios, and will be told from Black's perspective about his life growing up gay in a Mormon household to becoming a leader in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights movement."

I can't imagine there are many Mormons wanting that story told.

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I can't imagine there are many Mormons wanting that story told.

Told yet again, with all of the standard tropes that define the genre, as well as the political agenda that helps shape what is told as representative. Good Bye, I Love You (which I like), Angels in America, Perestroika, Confessions of a Mormon Boy, Ebershoff's The 19th Wife, a range of exit narratives...

Do you think there is any chance that, in coming from a writer who decided to close out Big Love by having his protagonist murdered by a Mormon neighbor, that Givens' Viper on the Hearth will be irrelevant to the final product and intended agenda?

Kevin Christensen

Pittsburgh, PA

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The Laffertys were raised LDS. They went on missions and held significant callings. They were initially involved with anti gov't/anti tax groups and graduated to polygamous groups. Very, very sad case.

True, but it wasn't until they left the church that they decided it was o.k. to kill other people.

Krakauer's premise just doesn't work. He tries to suggest that the teachings and history of the LDS church make violence in the name of God o.k. Theoretically you can probably make that argument, but since the reality is that very few LDS people are involved in violent crimes, and even fewer in crimes that they believe God condoned or which were done in His name (I can't think of any but there could be some out there) it shows that his interpretation of what LDS doctrine and scripture really mean on the topic is faulty.

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I can't imagine there are many Mormons wanting that story told.

Who in their right mind would want 'their' story told by someone who dislikes them and believes they are bad, especially when the person doing the telling is a folk hero among those the story is aimed at, meaning it's not likely his version of events will be questioned or critiqued?

Any uneasiness which a Mormon may feel towards this story is not because they are afraid the truth will come out. It's because they are afraid the truth won't.

But as I said before, I'm not familiar with Black's work and as yet have no reason to doubt that he is capable of being fair and objective on the subject.

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Theoretically you can probably make that argument, but since the reality is that very few LDS people are involved in violent crimes, and even fewer in crimes that they believe God condoned or which were done in His name...

It is much like complaining that the LDS interpretation on abortion is way too liberal and inconsistent and treats the fetus as inhuman while in comparison to one's own church members, the LDS rate is much, much lower. (Utah County rate of abortion is the lowest in the country: "The lowest rate for a large urban county was in Utah county with about 80% LDS. The rate was 24.8."

http://www.mormonsocialscience.org/2004/01/28/q-are-there-statistics-on-therapeutic-abortion-within-the-mormon-population/

find later rates projected for EVs, but have seen one stat that says one in six abortions is for an Evangelical).....hmm, which teaching is more effective at protecting actual fetuses?

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Who in their right mind would want 'their' story told by someone who dislikes them and believes they are bad, especially when the person doing the telling is a folk hero among those the story is aimed at, meaning it's not likely his version of events will be questioned or critiqued?

Any uneasiness which a Mormon may feel towards this story is not because they are afraid the truth will come out. It's because they are afraid the truth won't.

But as I said before, I'm not familiar with Black's work and as yet have no reason to doubt that he is capable of being fair and objective on the subject.

I don't think many gay ex Mormons would tell a story that Mormons would be thrilled to watch no matter how truthfully it was being told.

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Under the Banner of Heaven does NOT deal with mass murder within the LDS church. MMM is discussed of course but it is fairly brief. The main focus is on the history of the LDS church as well as a horrific murder of a mother and baby committed by the Lafferty brothers (who were not LDS but belonged to an offshoot fundamentalist Mormon group-not FLDS either) because they believed God told them to do it.

Krakauer tries to make the connection between violence and the LDS church, but since the MMM is pretty much the last violent thing the church, as an institution, can be blamed for, he had to go to fundamentalist Mormons to try to make the point.

Sorry, just had to clear that up!

.....................................................

Aside from the Laffertys, we have the Bishop brothers: Arthur Gary Bishop was put to death via lethal injection by the State of Utah on June 10, 1988, for the sex-torture and murder of five young boys aged 5-14. Arthur and his brother Douglas were both returned Mormon missionaries and Eagle Scouts, and both were pedophiles. Arthur joined the “Big Brother Program” in Salt Lake City, undoubtedly to acquire victims, and he also frequented pet stores and purchased animals for clearly bestial reasons: Uncooperative animals were put to death with a hammer!! This isn't pleasant to contemplate, but no sector of society is immune to such horror. Thankfully, we have a lower level of crime here in Utah.

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Something the whole family can watch.

Yup, and think how they will teach the difficult trials of standing for what is right against the evil, conservative Mahmans only wish to keep them from a lives of monogamous love and fulfilling their God-given right to be their own man. To fight the good fight of intolerance from people who refuse to allow them to be free! Free to choose the right, free to live a life of uplifting sexual, I mean, spiritual gratification. Yes, circle round folks, cuz this guy is going to lead us all to the promised land of enlightenment. I am on pins and needles in anticipation.

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Aside from the Laffertys, we have the Bishop brothers: Arthur Gary Bishop was put to death via lethal injection by the State of Utah on June 10, 1988, for the sex-torture and murder of five young boys aged 5-14. Arthur and his brother Douglas were both returned Mormon missionaries and Eagle Scouts, and both were pedophiles. Arthur joined the “Big Brother Program” in Salt Lake City, undoubtedly to acquire victims, and he also frequented pet stores and purchased animals for clearly bestial reasons: Uncooperative animals were put to death with a hammer!! This isn't pleasant to contemplate, but no sector of society is immune to such horror. Thankfully, we have a lower level of crime here in Utah.

But did the bishop boys do these acts in the name of God?

If they didn't then then they aren't the kind of maniacs that Krakauer was talking about or trying to connect to believing in Mormonism.

That's the issue. The Lafferty brothers did, and Krakauer attempts to use them to make the claim that Mormonism is a violent religion.

All belief systems have evil people as members. Krakauer was saying something different.

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Who in their right mind would want 'their' story told by someone who dislikes them and believes they are bad, especially when the person doing the telling is a folk hero among those the story is aimed at, meaning it's not likely his version of events will be questioned or critiqued?

I feel the same way, whenever Mormons promote talks or experiences about gays and lesbians that are told by "LDS folk-status heros" such as unquestioned, uncritiqued LDS General Authorities, and people like Josh Weed, Ty Mansfield, Evergreen International, etc., who believe that gays and lesbians are (or, at least act) "bad."

Daniel

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I feel the same way, whenever Mormons promote talks or experiences about gays and lesbians that are told by "LDS folk-status heros" such as General Authorities, and people like Josh Weed, Ty Mansfield, Evergreen International, etc., who believe that gays and lesbians are (or at least act) "bad."

Daniel

Exactly!

And I'm guessing you wish we would stop, and not because you are afraid that the truth about gay and lesbian people will come out if we don't, right?

It's normal not to want people who don't 'like' you to talk about you in a public forum because there will always be a fear that they are going to misrepresent you to people who won't know any better. Contrary to what California boy has implied, that foreboding is not a signal that you are worried that people will discover that you really are bad.

But, if you are going to embrace talking about "the other guy", then you have no legitimate reason to be upset when they also talk about you. What's good for the goose must be good for the gander, as long as both sides try very hard to be fair and objective, to not paint with a broad brush out of animosity, and to be humble about the responsibility they are taking upon themselves in representing a group of people they disagree with.

To reiterate: I'm not against Black telling his story (and I would hope that you Daniel aren't against heterosexual members of the church telling their stories in relation to the topic either) as long as he tries to be fair and objective (I'm guessing you want the same).

He doesn't have to agree with the LDS church to talk about it or share his feelings and opinions about it (and I don't think that LDS general authorities or any other LDS folk heroes need to agree with homosexuality either before they can talk about it-that wouldn't be very fair otherwise). Being honest but fair in such pursuits is, in my opinion, not to much for the other side to ask.

Mistakes and contentious talk will occur on both sides of this issue, but that's not justification for anyone else to follow suit.

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As to the miniseries, hopefully it will be fair and accurate in it's portrayal of Mormonism. That's all we can really ask. Krakauer didn't do a great job in his book with being objective (something that I hate in a nonfiction writer, being a historian of sorts, because it makes it impossible to really trust that what they are presenting is actually true and not being able to trust your sources is extremely annoying), so hopefully Black is more trustworthy in that regard. I really have no idea who he is.

Considering the subject manner, the screenwriter (Black), author of the book (Krakauer), and the history of Hollywood's portrayal of Mormons, I think it's safe to assume that the film will not portray us in a positive or even fair light.

I don't have any statistics to back this up (so don't ask for a CFR :)) but I would think that active Mormons as a whole would have one of the lowest violent crime rates of any group in America. I fear that this film will only add to the negative stereotypes and prejudices that many Americans already have of us.

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Yea, I love you guys. You are a very gentle, wise and lovng people. I like to spend time around LDS people at church and serving even know I may disagree with some doctrinal stances. It is correct what he says truly active members have the lowest crime rate.

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I predict angst. Lots of angst.

You just demonstrated a shining example of why so many, many, many people hate Mormons. Friendliness get rewarded with the devils hate.

Here is a quote for you to think about.

To return good for evil is divine. Good for good is human. Evil for evil is barbaric. Evil for good is satanic. - Lecrae

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But did the bishop boys do these acts in the name of God?

If they didn't then then they aren't the kind of maniacs that Krakauer was talking about or trying to connect to believing in Mormonism.

That's the issue. The Lafferty brothers did, and Krakauer attempts to use them to make the claim that Mormonism is a violent religion.

All belief systems have evil people as members. Krakauer was saying something different.

Understood, and certainly a good point.

However, it is always useful to note that (justified by God or by the self-serving ideology of NAMBLA or not), all is not sweetness and light here or anywhere else. We need to be as wise as serpents and as gentle as doves, rather than naive and vulnerable.

All the Adolf Schickelgrubers and David Koreshes and Jim Jones's of the world make it very clear that horrific events can occur if we are not watchful and outspoken in the face of evil. The main point is that God is not the author of these events.

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