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Anyone From Phoenix, Az? Need To Confirm A Story About The Church


Duncan

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I had heard sometime before this story and just came across a written copy of it and was wondering if it was true

"During the Depression in the 1930s, many businesses experienced great financial stress, and many failed. Good Samaritan Hospital, one of two Phoenix hospitals, did not escape this fate. Hospital superintendant J. O. Sexson was frantically trying to keep his institution afloat but was meeting one obstacle after another. The patients were out of work in many instances and could not pay their bills, and meeting the hospital payroll was becoming impossible. The board of directors of this Methodist Church-sponsored institution had done all they could, but it wasn’t enough. The banks could not help, in fact, the hospital had to have $75,000 soon or it would have to close.

At the Rotary Club meeting that week, J. O. Sexson sat next to his good friend, J. R. Price, and said, “J. R., your Mormon Church recently built, paid for and dedicated a new chapel here. Could your church loan us $75,000 and let us pay it back in monthly installments? I know we can do it.” The answer came quickly: “We just don’t have that kind of money locally, but if you are serious, I’ll be happy to arrange an appointment with our president in Salt Lake City.”

Mr. Sexson agreed to the meeting in Utah and met with the three members of the First Presidency (the governing body of the Church) and reviewed the Good Samaritan’s financial problems. They listened, questioned Mr. Sexson and then retired to an adjoining office for a few minutes. When they returned, President Heber J. Grant said, “Mr. Sexson, you have a very worthy cause, but we don’t loan money. We are not a bank. But we have a large membership in your Salt River Valley and we have heard good things about your hospital. We have decided to give you the funds you are in need of, and with it our blessings for your continued excellent service to your community.”

It was a memorable day when local Church leader J. Robert Price presented a check for $75,000 to the superintendent and board of directors of Good Samaritan Hospital. With this donation, Mr. Sexson was able to see the hospital through the trials of the Depression and keep the school of nursing operating, which also provided some 1,400 registered nurses during the years of its existence."

http://mormontemples...x/local-history

anyone know if this is legit? I LOVE it and hope it's real!

Edited by Duncan
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I had heard sometime before this story and just came across a written copy of it and was wondering if it was true

"During the Depression in the 1930s, many businesses experienced great financial stress, and many failed. Good Samaritan Hospital, one of two Phoenix hospitals, did not escape this fate. Hospital superintendant J. O. Sexson was frantically trying to keep his institution afloat but was meeting one obstacle after another. The patients were out of work in many instances and could not pay their bills, and meeting the hospital payroll was becoming impossible. The board of directors of this Methodist Church-sponsored institution had done all they could, but it wasn’t enough. The banks could not help, in fact, the hospital had to have $75,000 soon or it would have to close.

At the Rotary Club meeting that week, J. O. Sexson sat next to his good friend, J. R. Price, and said, “J. R., your Mormon Church recently built, paid for and dedicated a new chapel here. Could your church loan us $75,000 and let us pay it back in monthly installments? I know we can do it.” The answer came quickly: “We just don’t have that kind of money locally, but if you are serious, I’ll be happy to arrange an appointment with our president in Salt Lake City.”

Mr. Sexson agreed to the meeting in Utah and met with the three members of the First Presidency (the governing body of the Church) and reviewed the Good Samaritan’s financial problems. They listened, questioned Mr. Sexson and then retired to an adjoining office for a few minutes. When they returned, President Heber J. Grant said, “Mr. Sexson, you have a very worthy cause, but we don’t loan money. We are not a bank. But we have a large membership in your Salt River Valley and we have heard good things about your hospital. We have decided to give you the funds you are in need of, and with it our blessings for your continued excellent service to your community.”

It was a memorable day when local Church leader J. Robert Price presented a check for $75,000 to the superintendent and board of directors of Good Samaritan Hospital. With this donation, Mr. Sexson was able to see the hospital through the trials of the Depression and keep the school of nursing operating, which also provided some 1,400 registered nurses during the years of its existence."

http://mormontemples...x/local-history

anyone know if this is legit? I LOVE it and hope it's real!

I don't doubt it is true. In Southern California, Mormons painted a Catholic Church. Here in Portland, Mormons have done a lot of the work on a remodel of a center that is an adult day care center. The veracity of these stories should not be hard to run down at all.
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Haven't heard it. Good story. I interviewed there a few months ago for residency. We ended up going elsewhere, but really liked the people at the hospital (well, at least with that specific program)!

Edited by Judd
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I don't doubt it is true. In Southern California, Mormons painted a Catholic Church. Here in Portland, Mormons have done a lot of the work on a remodel of a center that is an adult day care center. The veracity of these stories should not be hard to run down at all.

Yes, and some years ago, when Westminster College in SLC was on the ropes financially, Pres. N. Eldon Tanner led a successful effort to obtain funds for that Presbyterian College, which had once had a strong hand in persecution of Utah Mormons.

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Yes, and some years ago, when Westminster College in SLC was on the ropes financially, Pres. N. Eldon Tanner led a successful effort to obtain funds for that Presbyterian College, which had once had a strong hand in persecution of Utah Mormons.

It is quite difficult for me to rise to the challenge of being a proper Mormon. This business of treating others like we would like to be treated can challenge me quite harshly at times. It is what binds me to the church.

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There is also the story of David O. McKay and the Lutherans. Apparently the Lutheran Church in SLC was looking for land to build a new church, and was having no luck. Nobody would sell them any. In desperation they turned to Church headquarters, where they talked to Pres. McKay. He told them not to worry, he'd see what he could do. The next day the Lutheran Church received a donation out of the blue of a large lot in SLC, big enough to build whatever they wanted.

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