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Prof. Dan Peterson


EllenMaksoud

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So, having been Muslim, I would enjoy reading Prof Peterson's views about Islam. I found something the other day, but now I can't find it and with my declining cognitive ability, I need help to find his blog. At least someone said he has a blog.

Thank you

Ellen

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So, having been Muslim, I would enjoy reading Prof Peterson's views about Islam. I found something the other day, but now I can't find it and with my declining cognitive ability, I need help to find his blog. At least someone said he has a blog.

Thank you

Ellen

Here's a link to his blog:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/danpeterson/

I don't think you'll find much there about Islam though.

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Here's a link to his blog:

http://www.patheos.c...gs/danpeterson/

I don't think you'll find much there about Islam though.

Thank you. Not much about Islam, you say? I have been told several times that he is the Mormon expert on Islamic studies.

I am working on an essay right now that describes the many connection points between Islam and Mormonism. I saw the similarities many times as I was converting from Islam to Mormonism, but was not astute enough to document them as I did. One of the areas is the strong connection between works and salvation that both share. I am working to understand that now.

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Ellen,

Just out of curiosity, of which "sect" of Islam were you an adherent? Sunni (or stricter variant Wahhabi), Shi'a, Ahmadiyya, other? Or non-standard variants like that in Nation of Islam? I know a thing or two about Islam but I defer to Dr. Peterson as he certainly is widely regarded as an expert in his field. He actually was invited to speak in Iran some years back because he and his views and writings on the subject are well respected in several Islamic countries.

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Ellen,

Just out of curiosity, of which "sect" of Islam were you an adherent? Sunni (or stricter variant Wahhabi), Shi'a, Ahmadiyya, other? Or non-standard variants like that in Nation of Islam? I know a thing or two about Islam but I defer to Dr. Peterson as he certainly is widely regarded as an expert in his field. He actually was invited to speak in Iran some years back because he and his views and writings on the subject are well respected in several Islamic countries.

Ellen,

Just out of curiosity, of which "sect" of Islam were you an adherent? Sunni (or stricter variant Wahhabi), Shi'a, Ahmadiyya, other? Or non-standard variants like that in Nation of Islam? I know a thing or two about Islam but I defer to Dr. Peterson as he certainly is widely regarded as an expert in his field. He actually was invited to speak in Iran some years back because he and his views and writings on the subject are well respected in several Islamic countries.

Hi there: When I first converted to Islam, I now see it was with the same frustration that Joseph Smith had when he was 14. I had been an EV for over 30 years, and left in exasperation over what I had experienced. They threw me out, but it was a relief to me to be free of the thought control and hate speech.

So, I unwittingly started out in Islam with some Wahabistic Muslims in the Portland West Hills at Asaber Masjid. And being in shock from my recent divorce, was anxious to do anything I could to please them and Allah SWT. So, their approach for women was long abaya and Niqab, with black gloves. Women at the Masjid are in a room upstairs from the men, and can not even see the Imam. There is an odd dichotomy here because in many ways women seem to be deprived; even confined, very often Muslim men are helpful; even protective. It was hard to understand, but I adapted, because the men were often so authoritative that it felt very unacceptable to disobey them. One told me to wear Niqab and I did so, thinking that I did not have a choice. That did not last long because non-Muslims are just so hostile to woman with Niqab.

Over the next 6 years, I gradually explored for more a more moderate expression of Islam. Finally, in 2008, I found a Masjid that was combination Sunni/Shia; their intent was to try to heal old rifts caused by the conflict between Muslims over the succession of authority. (Mormons had this same conflict with the death of Joseph Smith) This was a very good Masjid and they came about as close as any Masjid I had experienced.

So, when I moved to Painesville, Ohio for a year, I could not find a Masjid like the one I had attended so started at a moderate Sunni Masjid called MACE in Richmond Heights, Ohio. These were very moderate Sunnis, extremely adapted to the American way of life. Ancestors of some of the Muslims in this area came to America on slave ships in the pre-civil war era. Others are Pakistanis who came to America to escape the radical expression of Islam.

If you are familiar with Ohio, where I lived in Painesville, Richmond Heights and Kirtland are in fairly close proximity of each other, and of course driving through Kirtland is where I had my start with Mormons in March of 2011.

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You may want to check out this source: Mormons and Muslims (PDF version here)

I will try to work my way to it as I sift through my pile of work today. I am trying to understand why there is often such a difference between my experiences as a Muslim and what more educated people say. Perhaps I come at it from a cultural level and they approach it from an academic direction?

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Ellen,

Just out of curiosity, of which "sect" of Islam were you an adherent? Sunni (or stricter variant Wahhabi), Shi'a, Ahmadiyya, other? Or non-standard variants like that in Nation of Islam? I know a thing or two about Islam but I defer to Dr. Peterson as he certainly is widely regarded as an expert in his field. He actually was invited to speak in Iran some years back because he and his views and writings on the subject are well respected in several Islamic countries.

Another interesting thing about Sunnis and Shias is a feud between the two has been going on since Muhammad PBUH died. I do not doubt the validity of Shia complaints, but in spite of being perhaps right, the Shia only make up around 5% of world Muslims, and they are mainly in Iraq, and Iran with a smattering in much of the world. Few know it, but the majority of the oil in Saudi Arabia is on the coast around Al Kobar. This is a Shia area, and according to the Shia from that area, they say that tribe of Saud came in and took over the area when oil was discovered.

I was in the Art Museum at BYU at Provo in March of 2012 and saw the Islamic Art exhibits. It was immediately apparent that it was from the Shia (Persian) culture. The Iranian and Turkish nationals I met there were Shia.

The trip was far too rushed and tiring for a 65 year old woman. I would have loved to spent a week or two in the area as I would have liked to look at the Masjids in the SLC area.

The Shia have a belief in the 12 Imams, one of which, The Mahadi is said to be alive today. Interestingly, there is a passage in the Bible, (It may be the Joseph Smith version) where at the last supper, Jesus Christ mentions in passing, "what is it to you if he should live until I return". John 21:18-22 I wonder if the two ideas are related? I have so many questions. It is doubtful that I will live to obtain the answers to them all; perhaps after?

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