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Being Lds Part Of Identity


tyler90az

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I think getting people to the Temple, and anything else which serves to solidify and clarify the link between this life and the next, is key. :)

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I think getting a testimony of the Gospel is key but once that is obtained you should want to share your new found knowledge and many times this means defending it. In defending it being LDS becomes part of your identity. As stated above it will truly become who you are once you begin to understand some of the temple teachings and you realize we Latter-day Saints truly are a peculiar people!

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I think testimony is far more important than "identity".

We already have "social Mormons" who don't believe anymore but stay only because of their "identity" and the fact that they are "5th generation Mormons" etc.

Teach your kids how to recognize the spirit- THAT is what counts in my most humble opinion.

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I think a rigorous intellectual understanding of all times, places, and people is extremely important; we can only know ourselves if we "obtain a knowledge of history, and of countries, and of kingdoms, of laws of God and man." The glory of God is Intelligence, and I think the Lord wants us to receive "knowledge, of all things." I was just reading one of Truman Madsen's essays earlier this evening and thinking to myself that Mormonism is really the only place for me. It's the only place I've encountered -- and I've looked around a fair bit -- where I feel at home. It's unique enough to give it power, and yet open enough to pull in truth from wherever it may be found, from any other religion or social structure. Specifically, I think we cannot stress enough the importance of the philosophical claims that Mormonism emphasizes: the uncreated nature of matter and Intelligences, the coeternal physically-embodied plurality of weeping Gods of any gender, the worldwide universalist perspective on salvation (emphasized particularly well, I think, in the book of Ether) in which the Shepherd tends Sheep in many folds and remembers the "heathen", and all peoples are alike unto Him, whether Jew or Gentile. I think the "identity" we should focus on is exemplified by Aslan's habit of calling those He protects "Daughter of Eve" or "Son of Adam" -- that is, we are part of the same worldwide family of potentially glorious conscious entities, all of whom may be apotheosized as the Elohim if they only love each other.

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I think a rigorous intellectual understanding of all times, places, and people is extremely important; we can only know ourselves if we "obtain a knowledge of history, and of countries, and of kingdoms, of laws of God and man." The glory of God is Intelligence, and I think the Lord wants us to receive "knowledge, of all things." I was just reading one of Truman Madsen's essays earlier this evening and thinking to myself that Mormonism is really the only place for me. It's the only place I've encountered -- and I've looked around a fair bit -- where I feel at home. It's unique enough to give it power, and yet open enough to pull in truth from wherever it may be found, from any other religion or social structure. Specifically, I think we cannot stress enough the importance of the philosophical claims that Mormonism emphasizes: the uncreated nature of matter and Intelligences, the coeternal physically-embodied plurality of weeping Gods of any gender, the worldwide universalist perspective on salvation (emphasized particularly well, I think, in the book of Ether) in which the Shepherd tends Sheep in many folds and remembers the "heathen", and all peoples are alike unto Him, whether Jew or Gentile. I think the "identity" we should focus on is exemplified by Aslan's habit of calling those He protects "Daughter of Eve" or "Son of Adam" -- that is, we are part of the same worldwide family of potentially glorious conscious entities, all of whom may be apotheosized as the Elohim if they only love each other.

Not bad, kid! ;):good:

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Ann M. Dibb was really in tune with the spirit last general conference. If you make being a Son of God, follower of Christ, Mormon or any other variation a part of somebody's identity their testimony will last. It gives a person pride in who they are and what they believe.

https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2012/10/i-know-it-i-live-it-i-love-it?lang=eng

Mfub, I would agree you need to believe first before it becomes a part of your identity. For the most part, people will have some type of crisis of faith.

Does being a Son of God as their identity or 5th generation Mormon carry them through a spiritual rough patch? Does it help a youth transition to active LDS adult or retains a convert?

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Does being a Son of God as their identity or 5th generation Mormon carry them through a spiritual rough patch? Does it help a youth transition to active LDS adult or retains a convert?

Well whatever works for the person is what is best I think.

All I am objecting to is the idea that our identity be to being a Mormon as opposed to having a testimony.

Blake Ostler did an interview with Sterling McMurrin, a Mormon philosopher who did not believe in the Book of Mormon, temple ordinances or virtually any other classical Mormon doctrines, and this is what McMurrin said:

O: Are you a Mormon in any real sense of the word?

M: Of course I am. I am a member of the Church. I was reared in it,

and my parents and all of my grandparents were reared in it. My personality

and character, for good or bad, are to a large degree a product of it. Its

teachings continue to greatly affect my attitudes and ideas. It is the foundation

of my religion. Its history is just as much a part of my cultural heritage as

if I were orthodox. Its social life is an important element of my environment.

Its ecclesiastical affairs are of positive interest and concern to me. Its moral

teachings are the basis of my own moral beliefs and ideals. I must say again

that many of the orthodox, who often are not nearly so orthodox when you

get under the surface, find it strange that most of the unorthodox feel close to

the Church.

https://dialoguejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/sbi/articles/Dialogue_V17N01_20.pdf

Now this man was an agnostic, but being LDS was clearly part of his "identity". Do I want this for my kids? Not at all!

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Well whatever works for the person is what is best I think.

All I am objecting to is the idea that our identity be to being a Mormon as opposed to having a testimony.

Blake Ostler did an interview with Sterling McMurrin, a Mormon philosopher who did not believe in the Book of Mormon, temple ordinances or virtually any other classical Mormon doctrines, and this is what McMurrin said:

https://dialoguejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/sbi/articles/Dialogue_V17N01_20.pdf

Now this man was an agnostic, but being LDS was clearly part of his "identity". Do I want this for my kids? Not at all!

I agree. I relate to the guy quoted so well but am holding out hope that the church is true. It makes one wonder if people might get confused if the church is true based on the culture they've been raised in or if they don't know how to be any other identity. I'm so glad for your post because I disagreed with what some of the first few posts were saying.
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I think as members of the church we pretty much have the LDS faith ingrained in us from the very beginning. I look at how familiar little children, and adults as well, are with the church buildings that they may often behave like they do at home, which isn't always reverent.

As a convert, it becomes part of our identity as we read the scriptures, attend our meetings, and associate with those of our faith. One truly cannot be an active member of the church without having it imprinted on our lives.

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Becoming a member of the LDS Church was the next step of my search for God. I was 29 years old .I read every thing I could get my hands on . This was before the internet , so it was literaly hands on .As I read scriptures and other books commenting on scripture ,I was found wanting . I felt it was incomplete . It was not until I found the LDS scriptures and book that I felt satisfied . I was baptised and kept on with my studies and my testimony just grew and grew I became a rock solid MDS member .

I was then introducted to anti-mormon stuff. I thought it would affect me in a negative way . My bishop at the time told me to stay away from all anti-mormon stuff .I was told that anti-mormon mix truth with half truths and with lies . So I stayed away for a while , but the anti-mormon stuff just seemed to be everywhere. I finaly read it all. To my surprise it actually solidified my testimony. I would use the rule " one lie could be a error two lies they are not interested in the truth , three lies is is just attacking my faith "Every anti-mormon thing I have come accross has many lies and very few truths that are usually out of context .

So here I am today . A strong Mormon . I teach my Kids and grand kids by example and never waiver in my solid tesitimony when they have questions or doubts . I think we should work on ourselves then do what we naturally do , teach our loved ones .

Edited by salvar774
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Being a child of a loving Heavenly Father with a plan for us that we have already bought into in the pre-existence is the identity that is needed. If you have an identify of LDS, you're likely to miss the point that the church is a temporal institution and cannot substitute for any of the work we have to do on our own.

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Is that the key to retention?

How can you help it become part of your childs identity?

What is the best way to make it part of your own identity?

I do not think identity is the key to retention, as God will work with anyone's identity, no matter how poorly it is formed. Retention I think is based on doing those things that develop identities as true children of God. A friend, a responsibility, nourishing; keeping temple covenants.

How can you help it become part of your childs identity? You don't; I think that is the wrong objective. Once a child realizes that he has loving parents, has responsibiliteis given him of them, and receives proper nourishing from his parents, he realizes what it means to be born in (or baptized into) the covenant and seeks to keep it as the 'fathers" did before him. "LDS" is an identification (a label), not the idenity itself.

What is the best way to make it part of your own identity? Not to!

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Is that the key to retention?

It "worked for me" until age 35. Would have related well to Sterling M. McMurrin, back then.

How can you help it become part of your childs identity?

No wife or kids when I was LDS. I was "that guy" in YSA and later in the single adult program--the one who didn't wear garments, hadn't served a mission, and could express "hope" but not "belief" when queried about core tenents of the LDS faith. The lonesome loser who showed up every week, often only to further isolate himself by raising difficult points (generally centered on theology as opposed to church history) and thereby digging an ever deeper hole. So this one's a big N/A.

What is the best way to make it part of your own identity?

Leaving aside the LDS element, the question of identity is key. When I think about my identity, it's easy to think of my self (now) as a husband, a father, a director. But as a Christian, my core identity should come from being, "in Christ." We're currently going through a sermon series on Ephesians (John Calvin's favorite book in the Bible) that is exactly on this question of identity. A timely exposition.

--Erik

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\

But is a persons identity the cause of real growth thereby being a cause of real retention?

I guess that can work for awhile until or unless something changes it. For a long time my identity was the cause of growth until an identity crisis from a belief crisis occurred, hopefully maybe the real growth begins to take root for a deeper retention if I continue a quest for answers and keep the faith. Edited by Tacenda
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if you don't know who you are--then you don't know what to do

That is true that identity follows faith in most circumstances. I do not think it is truly a part of our identity if we don't display we our LDS. Which has been the case for me in a few situations. That means it is not part of my identity or maybe I do not have enough faith?

Then I am like you five solas my identity is that I am a husband and father. More then likely it will and has been already that my job is part of my identity. That is where the problem comes in for me. Being a father to the extent we are now fades. Is it possible that is the cause of empty nest sydrome? For me, I want my identity to be in some thing I will be forever and that can not be taken.

There in is the problem for me as making husband a part of my identity also. I have faith my wife will not leave me, however, statistics say it is a 50% chance.

That is what also led me to make a post about identity. My thought process was the church is something that can always be in my life if I choose and will if I include it in my identity. That has recently changed to disciple of christ. The other thing that can not be taken from me is learning.

My identity:

Disciple of Christand a Learner

It is my hopes that my "new identity" will save me some heartache in life.

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But is a persons identity the cause of real growth thereby being a cause of real retention?

I do not think so. Real growth is of course authentic conversion, which would result in real retention (remaining active in the Church). I do not think identity drives conversion, because the Spirit drives conversion in a receptive person regardless of the identity of that person. The Spirit also strives with all the children of God unless they pass a point of not repenting. The qualities, not the identity, of the person allow him to cooperate with the Spirit so that he can be converted. I see identity as a useful but more superficial and imperfect description than what the person really is.

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That is true that identity follows faith in most circumstances. I do not think it is truly a part of our identity if we don't display we our LDS. Which has been the case for me in a few situations. That means it is not part of my identity or maybe I do not have enough faith?

Then I am like you five solas my identity is that I am a husband and father. More then likely it will and has been already that my job is part of my identity. That is where the problem comes in for me. Being a father to the extent we are now fades. Is it possible that is the cause of empty nest sydrome? For me, I want my identity to be in some thing I will be forever and that can not be taken.

There in is the problem for me as making husband a part of my identity also. I have faith my wife will not leave me, however, statistics say it is a 50% chance.

That is what also led me to make a post about identity. My thought process was the church is something that can always be in my life if I choose and will if I include it in my identity. That has recently changed to disciple of christ. The other thing that can not be taken from me is learning.

My identity:

Disciple of Christand a Learner

It is my hopes that my "new identity" will save me some heartache in life.

I think we may be saying something similar, even though we'd disagree who Christ is (assuming you adhere to LDS teaching, Jesus is an "organized intelligence," etc.). In my experience, the significance of identity wasn't discussed much among LDS--let alone what it means when the Apostle Paul wrote believers are "in Christ." So it was refreshing to see your post, and to see someone on the board care about something besides "NOMs" and the work of John Dehlin.

;0)

Thanks, tyler90az

--Erik

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