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‘Wear Pants’ Group To Lds Leaders: Let Women Pray At Conference


Tacenda

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http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/blogsfaithblog/55627824-180/general-women-church-conference.html.csp

Thoughts on why women haven't been allowed to pray in Conference? I know that it use to be that way in Sacrament meetings...but could it also happen in General Conference? Not that I really care one way or another. I'm not a big feminist. But do however see a striking difference of male vs. female ratio of speakers in General Conference.

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Should be an easy change for the Church to be able to facilitate. It's crazy that no woman has prayed in General Conference, plus I usually enjoy the sisters prayers more than my brothers in the gospel.

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Wow. I had not realized that women have never prayed in conference. Also, I had not realized that they did not pray ntheir congregations, or at least it was looked dow upon so to speak, until 1978. 1978, that seems to be a big year for President Kimball and the LDS Church.

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http://www.sltrib.co...erence.html.csp

Thoughts on why women haven't been allowed to pray in Conference? I know that it use to be that way in Sacrament meetings...but could it also happen in General Conference? Not that I really care one way or another. I'm not a big feminist. But do however see a striking difference of male vs. female ratio of speakers in General Conference.

Maybe the practice is a reference to instruction given in the D&C, where “conference” and “general conference” were primarily priesthood meetings. Though all members may be invited to attend, only some are invited to speak and act on most or all of “church business” except the general sustaining. So while priesthood office may have something to do with presiding, conducting, assigning talks and dedicating the meeting via opening and closing prayers, it is a great example of how the priesthood blesses all members regardless of priesthood office.

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Maybe the practice is a reference to instruction given in the D&C, where “conference” and “general conference” were primarily priesthood meetings. Though all members may be invited to attend, only some are invited to speak and act on most or all of “church business” except the general sustaining. So while priesthood office may have something to do with presiding, conducting, assigning talks and dedicating the meeting via opening and closing prayers, it is a great example of how the priesthood blesses all members regardless of priesthood office.

Wasn't aware of this passage. Thanks that answers a lot!
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http://www.sltrib.co...erence.html.csp

Thoughts on why women haven't been allowed to pray in Conference? I know that it use to be that way in Sacrament meetings...but could it also happen in General Conference? Not that I really care one way or another. I'm not a big feminist. But do however see a striking difference of male vs. female ratio of speakers in General Conference.

They need to take it up with the Head of the church, not just his servants.
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Maybe the practice is a reference to instruction given in the D&C, where “conference” and “general conference” were primarily priesthood meetings. Though all members may be invited to attend, only some are invited to speak and act on most or all of “church business” except the general sustaining. So while priesthood office may have something to do with presiding, conducting, assigning talks and dedicating the meeting via opening and closing prayers, it is a great example of how the priesthood blesses all members regardless of priesthood office.

This is probably the same reason why Sacrament meeting prayers were given by priesthood holders for a while. The likely reason for this was because the Sacrament is a priesthood ordinance, and therefore all prayers given in the Sacrament meeting were restricted to priesthood holders.

During the 1970s women's lib was getting into full swing and a few women were complaining that they were not being allowed to participate as much as they should in church meetings and leadership positions. The Church leaders did not change any doctrine or official policies because of this, but I think they did realize that there was no scriptural reason for why women could not pray in Sacrament meeting. It was mostly out of tradition that only priesthood holders would give the prayers. It was then that they decided to encourage Bishops to call on both men and women to pray. In 1978 the following announcement was made:

“The First Presidency and Council of the Twelve have determined that there is no scriptural prohibition against sisters offering prayers in sacrament meetings. It was therefore decided that it is permissible for sisters to offer prayers in any meetings they attend, including sacrament meetings, Sunday School meetings, and stake conferences. Relief Society visiting teachers may offer prayers in homes that they enter in fulfilling visiting teaching assignments.” (Marvin K. Gardner, “News of the Church,” Ensign, Nov. 1978, 100)

Perhaps the same reasoning could be applied to General Conference.

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Maybe the practice is a reference to instruction given in the D&C, where “conference” and “general conference” were primarily priesthood meetings. Though all members may be invited to attend, only some are invited to speak and act on most or all of “church business” except the general sustaining. So while priesthood office may have something to do with presiding, conducting, assigning talks and dedicating the meeting via opening and closing prayers, it is a great example of how the priesthood blesses all members regardless of priesthood office.

CFR please
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They need to take it up with the Head of the church, not just his servants.

I am formulating a theory that regardless of their position on the Priesthood leadership and church practices (be it Molly or Rebel) many women in our church are expert at telling others what to do.

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CFR please

I did a word search in the LDS scriptures; here is as sampling of references for conference or general conference as a formal priesthood meeting called by the First Presidency.

D&C 20: 61-64, 67, 81-82

61 The several elders composing this church of Christ are to meet in conference once in three months, or from time to time as said conferences shall direct or appoint;

62 And said conferences are to do whatever church business is necessary to be done at the time.

• • •

67 Every president of the high priesthood (or presiding elder), bishop, high councilor, and high priest, is to be ordained by the direction of a high council or general conference.

• • •

81 It shall be the duty of the several churches, composing the church of Christ, to send one or more of their teachers to attend the several conferences held by the elders of the church,

D&C 58: 56, 58, 61-62

56 And let the work of the gathering be not in haste, nor by flight; but let it be done as it shall be counseled by the elders of the church at the conferences, according to the knowledge which they receive from time to time.

• • •

58 And let a conference meeting be called; and after that let my servants Sidney Rigdon and Joseph Smith, Jun., return, and also Oliver Cowdery with them, to accomplish the residue of the work which I have appointed unto them in their own land, and the residue [of work directed by the keys] as shall be ruled by the conferences.

• • •

61 Let the residue of the elders of this church, who are coming to this land, some of whom are exceedingly blessed even above measure, also hold a conference upon this land.

62 And let my servant Edward Partridge direct the conference which shall be held by them.

D&C 73: 1-2, 4

1 For verily, thus saith the Lord, it is expedient in me that athey should continue preaching the gospel, and in exhortation to the churches in the regions round about, until conference;

2 And then, behold, it shall be made known unto them, by the voice of the conference, their several missions.

D&C 124: 88, 144

88 Let my servant William go and proclaim my everlasting gospel with a loud voice, and with great joy, as he shall be moved upon by my Spirit, unto the inhabitants of Warsaw, and also unto the inhabitants of Carthage, and also unto the inhabitants of Burlington, and also unto the inhabitants of Madison, and await patiently and diligently for further instructions at my general conference, saith the Lord.

• • •

144 And a commandment I give unto you, that you should fill all these offices and approve of those names which I have mentioned, or else disapprove of them at my general conference;

D&C 72: 7

7 And the duty of the bishop shall be made known by the commandments which have been given, and the voice of the conference.

D&C 118: 1

1 Verily, thus saith the Lord: Let a conference be held immediately; let the Twelve be organized; and let men be appointed to supply the place of those who are fallen.

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I find it interesting that rather than the church just ignoring them as a pesky group of apostates they have responded to the campaign:

People can also sign a petition at the website, asking the authorities to invite a woman to pray at the April 2013 General Conference.

The LDS Church responded Monday evening that the conference lineup was already set, but didn’t say whether women would be praying.

"Decisions on speakers and prayers at General Conference were made several weeks ago and assignments were given to the men and women involved last week," church spokesman Scott Trotter wrote in an email. "Customarily, details of the conference programs are not announced until General Conference."

The fact he answers but defers the question suggests they could do so at some point.

An 'old boy' in my previous unit who was my Branch Clerk used to teach that women should only give the closing prayer as the 'invocation' was a priesthood responsibility. I kindly showed him the handbook and he respectfully stopped saying so.

http://www.lds.org/handbook/handbook-2-administering-the-church/meetings-in-the-church/18.5#185

18.5 Prayers in Church Meetings

Men and women may offer both opening and closing prayers in Church meetings.

Members of the bishopric should avoid the pattern of having a husband and wife pray in the same meeting. Such a pattern might convey an unintentional message of exclusion to those who are single. Members who are not often called upon should be included among those who are invited to pray.

It doesn't even say that they have to be members to offer a prayer. Have you ever seen an investigator or non-baptised spouse invited to pray?

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I don't understand the reasoning behind this "Ban," either. Prayer is not a priesthood ordinance. (I can hear Fiddler on the Roof's Tevye now: "Tradition! Tradition!") It would only be a slight exaggeration if I were to say that I would rather that 90% of the sisters in the Church pray for me than 90% of the brethren in the Church lay their hands on me and use the priesthood. :)

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I find it interesting that rather than the church just ignoring them as a pesky group of apostates they have responded to the campaign ...

The Church's "response," such as it is, isn't necessarily as rare as you suggest.

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I think the reason why women don't give prayers at General Conference is probably because GC is a time that we expect to hear from the General Authorities and General Officers of the Church, all of whom are men. But then again, women give talks at GC, so I don't see any good reason why they shouldn't be allowed to say a prayer. I would welcome women giving prayers at GC, but I don't make the decisions.

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I think the reason why women don't give prayers at General Conference is probably because GC is a time that we expect to hear from the General Authorities and General Officers of the Church, all of whom are men. But then again, women give talks at GC, so I don't see any good reason why they shouldn't be allowed to say a prayer. I would welcome women giving prayers at GC, but I don't make the decisions.

Are the RS general presidency, the Primary general presidency, and the YW general presidency counted as general authorities or general officers of the church?

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I think the reason why women don't give prayers at General Conference is probably because GC is a time that we expect to hear from the General Authorities and General Officers of the Church, all of whom are men. [Emphasis mine]. But then again, women give talks at GC, so I don't see any good reason why they shouldn't be allowed to say a prayer. I would welcome women giving prayers at GC, but I don't make the decisions.

That's not correct. The General Relief Society, General Young Women, and General Primary Presidencies are all composed of general officers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and, last I checked, none of them are men. Just sayin'! ;)

P.S.: I see Bluebell beat me to it. (Great minds think alike, Bluebell! :D:friends:)

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IIRC correctley a woman gave the opening prayer at the 1st Pres. Christmas devotional

As I tried to point out, the only reason a woman would not give an opening prayer in a Church meeting is if it is a priesthood meeting, and general conferences in the D&C seem to allude to such conferences being priesthood meetings. Those without the priesthood are often invited to attend and speak in priesthood meetings, and if this is the case, GC as a priesthood meeting would follow the same pattern we are familiar with in our local quorums.

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As I tried to point out, the only reason a woman would not give an opening prayer in a Church meeting is if it is a priesthood meeting, and general conferences in the D&C seem to allude to such conferences being priesthood meetings. Those without the priesthood are often invited to attend and speak in priesthood meetings, and if this is the case, GC as a priesthood meeting would follow the same pattern we are familiar with in our local quorums.

"conference" is in the Doctrine and Covenants quite a few time "general conference" maybe 3 times.

What verses do you use to suggest that General Conference is priesthood meeting to which non-priesthood are invited and encouraged to attend.

How do you different between General Conference and the Priesthood Session of General Conference?

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As I tried to point out, the only reason a woman would not give an opening prayer in a Church meeting is if it is a priesthood meeting, and general conferences in the D&C seem to allude to such conferences being priesthood meetings. Those without the priesthood are often invited to attend and speak in priesthood meetings, and if this is the case, GC as a priesthood meeting would follow the same pattern we are familiar with in our local quorums.

I think the old belief, where women were not allowed to pray in sacrament meeting, shows that a meeting being a priesthood meeting is definitely not the only reason that a woman would not give an opening prayer. We shouldn't dismiss the power of tradition when it comes to church policy.

(-not saying that's why women don't pray in GC right now, just pointing out that there is precedent for women not being allowed to do things in the church with no valid reason whatsoever)

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I don't get what a "Priesthood meeting" even is. Is a meeting with Priesthood there, well that every meeting in the Church with a MP holder there. if it means someone exercisea the priesthood then sacrament meeting is a priesthood meeting and in our ward who gets to pray is whoever shows up on time male or female. If it's where priesthood is exercised then General Conference isn't a priesthood mtg

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