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Temple Classes


EllenMaksoud

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So, much to my extreme astonishment, I am taking Temple preparation classes!

Sunday in class the Instructor, our past patriarch, reviewed Moral Purity. In DC 42:22-26 I assume that the same thing that applies to the Man would also apply to the woman.

DC 132:42, also reviews similar subject matter.

At the time we were being taught, when this came up, I felt my very soul being struck, and it rang like a deep gong, jarring me to my innermost parts. I am sorry for the stilted language, but it is 3:30 AM, and uncharictaristically, I can not sleep because my soul is troubled. It is confusing because I prayed for forgiveness of this sin last winter before I was baptised. Do I have to ask for and be given forgiveness more than once for a sin? Oh, I do not hesitate. What ever Heavenly Father asks, I will do.

Is it common for past sins; forgiven ones, to come up again in Temple classes? This is most confusing and disconcerting.

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Is it common for past sins; forgiven ones, to come up again in Temple classes? This is most confusing and disconcerting.

No!

You do not have to to ask for and be given forgiveness more than once for a sin. You might continue to pray to God privately about it to address any residual encumbrances and wounds you may carry, but you need not mention any resolved past sins in temple recommend interviews with priesthood authorities.

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It's very common for Satan to attempt to you make you doubt the miracle of forgiveness as often as he is able. I find that he really likes to use these types of moments because they are likely to have the most impact on us.

If you sincerely repented before you were baptized, then you have been forgiven of that sin and do not need to claim any guilt that satan might try to throw at you. If you absolutely cannot get over the guilt, then speaking to the bishop so that he can ease your feelings might help.

Repentance is real, and so is forgiveness. We won't ever forget our sins, in order that we more easily can steer clear of them in the future, but remembering them, and disliking them, is not a sign that we have not been forgiven.

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So, much to my extreme astonishment, I am taking Temple preparation classes!

Sunday in class the Instructor, our past patriarch, reviewed Moral Purity. In DC 42:22-26 I assume that the same thing that applies to the Man would also apply to the woman.

DC 132:42, also reviews similar subject matter.

At the time we were being taught, when this came up, I felt my very soul being struck, and it rang like a deep gong, jarring me to my innermost parts. I am sorry for the stilted language, but it is 3:30 AM, and uncharictaristically, I can not sleep because my soul is troubled. It is confusing because I prayed for forgiveness of this sin last winter before I was baptised. Do I have to ask for and be given forgiveness more than once for a sin? Oh, I do not hesitate. What ever Heavenly Father asks, I will do.

Is it common for past sins; forgiven ones, to come up again in Temple classes? This is most confusing and disconcerting.

You have per chance stumbled upon the most difficult of situations for each child of God. God's mercy and forgiveness is infinite; it knows no bounds and is instantaneous in the presence of a broken heart. The challenge is to forgive ourselves and to remember them no more. Our Father tells us that he forgives us and brings us back into purity, as pure and white as the driven snow; however, we often hold onto our faults, our shortcomings, our sins such that we persecute ourselves endlessly. We must learn the hard lesson to forgive ourselves and forget our sins just as our Father does. Think on this thing that bothers you and remember the promises of complete forgiveness of baptism; remember the feelings of forgiveness after baptism and never forget them. The evil one will often bring to mind these sins; he desires that we always feel unworthy as a way in which to destroy our desire to even pray, attend church, or partake of the Sacrament. Each Sunday when we partake of the Sacrament, when prepared, you must realize that at that point it is as if you have entered the waters of baptism all over again. It is time to forget the past and look to the future.

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Thank you all for your loving and instructive comments. I was worried that I had stumbled into an LDS doctrinal truth that I had not been aware of. And I was worried that Heavenly Father was sternly reminding me to not sin ANYMORE! Oh, you and he can most certainly be assured that the pain of the past is enough to act as a deterent to future sin.

Thank you.

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I am very thankful for a bishop, a very long time ago, who not only told me that I never needed to discuss a forgiven sin again....he also very firmly stated that I had no obligation to say anything but "no" if I was asked about sins in any future interview by any church authority.

Situations are likely to come up in interviews and such when general questions about anything we need to repent for are asked. That does not mean go back and dredge up everything we ever did that has been addressed. And never let anyone prod you to to that. A forgiven sin does not exist anymore so you can look anyone in the eye and say no with great confidence and assurance.

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I am very thankful for a bishop, a very long time ago, who not only told me that I never needed to discuss a forgiven sin again....he also very firmly stated that I had no obligation to say anything but "no" if I was asked about sins in any future interview by any church authority. ...

Just to not misunderstand... this mean, if someone lapsed with the WoW, there's no obligation to say anything?

Edited by Veles
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Ask yourself if you fully repented of the sin. It may be that you know more now about how it was a sin, so you now feel like you didn't know enough to really repent. Your baptism did wash away your sins. But when we come to understand anew the nature of those sins, discussing that with the bishop often brings a relief and closure on them. Asking your Heavenly Father anew for forgiveness also might bring you peace that is presently alluding you. (You'll hear stories from members who didn't fully confess something, maybe told the story in a way that didn't altogether accept responsibility, etc., for whom the issue nagged at them for very many years until finally they confessed it to their bishop. Whether or not it is required (which it most likely is not, but we don't know your repentance process), doing so can relieve you of the continuing burden.)

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Hello EllenMaksoud...

I sent you a Personal Message also... but I find that sometimes one of the hardest things to do is to forgive ourselves. In my mind and heart I know that I've repented and been forgiven but that doesn't mean I don't cringe on occasion... when that happens I just remember the Atonement and all the many answers to prayers, and the many blessings I continue to receive since returning and once again grasping the iron rod...

GG

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Doctrine & Covenants 58:

42 Behold, he who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, remember them no more.

Isaiah 1:

“Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.”

Alma 36 (Alma’s conversion):

17 And it came to pass that as I was thus racked with torment, while I was harrowed up by the memory of my many sins, behold, I remembered also to have heard my father prophesy unto the people concerning the coming of one Jesus Christ, a Son of God, to atone for the sins of the world.

18 Now, as my mind caught hold upon this thought, I cried within my heart: O Jesus, thou Son of God, have mercy on me, who am in the gall of bitterness, and am encircled about by the everlasting chains of death.

19 And now, behold, when I thought this, I could remember my pains no more; yea, I was harrowed up by the memory of my sins no more.

20 And oh, what joy, and what marvelous light I did behold; yea, my soul was filled with joy as exceeding as was my pain!

21 Yea, I say unto you, my son, that there could be nothing so exquisite and so bitter as were my pains. Yea, and again I say unto you, my son, that on the other hand, there can be nothing so exquisite and sweet as was my joy.

I should point out where Alma says in verse 20 that while he did not forget his sins so as to avoid going down that path again, once he repented he no longer remembered the pain associated with them. Satan sometimes (too often, dang it! :angry:) ;) tries to creep into our consciousness because we remember our sins and convince us that we’re still accountable for sins of which we have sincerely repented, but it isn’t true.

Your association with the Church of Jesus Christ is not longstanding enough for you to appreciate this, but President Spencer W. Kimball once said that he repents every day. A more saintly, more Godly man would be hard to find, and if daily repentance is good enough for him it’s good enough for me. Someone here (I forget who, or I would be happy to give proper attribution) has in his signature line, “The next time Satan reminds you of your past, remind him of his future.” :)

I should add, with due respect to my brothers and sisters who may hold a contrary view and have expressed it in this thread, that it’s possible (even likely) for Satan to try to convince you that you’re still responsible for sincerely-repented-of sin almost anywhere, any time. But because you have a body, you have the potential to exercise great faith, and you have access to Priesthood power, while it may be possible for Satan occasionally to bruise your heel (we’re living in a fallen, mortal world, after all) you have power to crush his head.

I wish you well. :)

Edited by Kenngo1969
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