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Is China Ready? Is The Church Ready?


cdowis

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Hmmm..... there will be a large influx of missionaries in the next few months. Our mission is getting two sets of missionaries per ward.

But I personally think this is temporary until................

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Why China's New Leaders Will Be Reformists

China on Thursday unveiled the members of its top decision-making body, the Politburo Standing Committee. Xi Jinpingand Li Keqiang, as expected, were appointed chief and deputy of China's ruling Communist Party and will takeover in March as the country's president and premier, respectively.

The other five newly-elected members are - current vice premier Wang Qishan, North Korea-trained economist Zhang Dejiang, Tianjin party chief Zhang Gaoli, Liu Yunshan, a conservative who is said to have kept domestic media in control and Shanghai party boss Yu Zhengsheng.

snip

While the omission of Wang and Li came as a surprise, China watchers said they were optimistic the new leadership will place both economic and political reforms high on their agenda.

"The transition of power offers the new leaders an historic opportunity to quickly implement a decade of stalled reforms. We are confident that the new leaders will take bold moves because they know that the required reforms are not only necessary, but now also urgent," Davide Cucino, president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, told Reuters.

One clue in that direction is the cutting of size of the Standing Committee to 7 from the earlier 9 members, which experts said would lead to more cohesive decision making and allow for policy changes to be implemented faster.

snip

"They don't have much choice, they have to reform. I think they're actually aware of it, that the people are tired of a lot of the clichés that are being uttered so far. They want to see some action," Wang said.

James Gruber, author of the "Asia Confidential" stock market newsletter, agreed, saying that, "Xi Jinping understands not to reform is to endanger the party."

He said it is highly unlikely the "status quo" will remain, adding that the government will roll out fresh fiscal stimulus measures to support the economy after March 2013, when the leadership transition is completed.

http://finance.yahoo...-134527383.html
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Because rumors are fun:

I know 3 people who have opened mission calls that say you are hereby called to Taiwan until the China mission is opened #MindBlown

— Jessica Ann Weymouth (@JWey7)

November 9, 2012

http://theboard.byu.edu/questions/69688/

Heard #rumors about #LDSmission calls to #China? Don't worry, we're on it. In the meantime, share this: http://t.co/HrHNNqBH

— The Student Review (@YStudentReview)

November 14, 2012
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Hasn't the Church been in China for years?Just not mainland China. I personally think that the Church will not be on the mainland in any numbers for a decade. Review the treatment of the Falun Gong to see just how accepting the Chinese leaders are to religious groups. And the precepts of the Falun Gong are pretty mild.

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The church is not in "mainland" China, only Hong Kong.

And you are mistaken about "secret" missionaries. Members are advised not to even speak to the Chinese about the church, or even mention their membership in the church. Similar to Saudi Arabia.

Last I heard, the representative of the church is a native Chinese who was converted in Hawaii, but that was awhile back. The church is *very* strict in following the rules. They recently had a meeting with the Chinese government representatives, but no details were given on their discussion. I assume it was to reinforce our compliance with their rules and laws.

In another thread, I cited an article where they were recently allowing more religious freedom on a small scale -- home churches. It is now "cool" for businessmen and leaders to be Christian. The Catholics have a presence there, but the leaders are under the direct approval and control of the government, unless that has changed recently.

China has a very bad history with Christian missionaries.

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Hmmm..... there will be a large influx of missionaries in the next few months. Our mission is getting two sets of missionaries per ward.

But I personally think this is temporary until................

cnbc_article_header.png

No not ready for Billions. They also don't like Americians as a general rule.

Why China's New Leaders Will Be Reformists

http://finance.yahoo...-134527383.html

While looking back on posts, Nothing I said appeared. There are moral issues with certain laws we would have to abide with...
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As I said above I am pretty sure we have missionaries in China. They may be the member missionary type but they are there.

Can you share with us your sources, since you are "pretty sure", or is this just an assumption. This is a pretty serious since it directly violates church policy regarding China, and loose talk like that can cause problems for the church in its relationship with the government.

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Can you share with us your sources, since you are "pretty sure", or is this just an assumption. This is a pretty serious since it directly violates church policy regarding China, and loose talk like that can cause problems for the church in its relationship with the government.

OK to spell it out. There are members of the church in China. In the church every member is a missionary. Ergo we have missionaries where ever there are church members therefore we have missionaries in China..

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From the link I gave above.

Understanding and complying with the unique restrictions on religious activities in China has enabled expatriate members of the Church to gain the trust of the Chinese government — a trust resulting in the members here being allowed to meet together much like others throughout the world.

The restrictionsfor expatriate members in China include no proselyting of any kind, no distribution of religious materials and — similar to other foreign religious groups — no invitations to Chinese nationals to join the international branches' meetings or activities.

Other differences include the branches meeting in homes or rented halls since there are no Church-owned facilities in mainland China as well as the restriction against shipping religious media materials into the country.

Church leaders in China regularly remind the expatriate LDS members here of the importance of adhering to the accepted policies and procedures, so there are no misunderstandings or missteps.

The members are also reminded there are no restrictions on Christlike living, service to others and setting a good example and that their efforts to abide by the government guidelines for religious activities while in China help the Church as it continues to build bridges of trust in China.

When I get a chance, I will ask my relative about any activities that are missionary related there. Sounds like they may be able to answer questions about their faith.
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Shanghai has a couple of branches/wards, I believe. I have family there. Apparently there are 11 international branches in China as of 2009: http://www.ldschurchnews.com/articles/56421/China-Expatriate-members-branches-building-bridge-of-trust.html

Good to hear. I eagerly await the time when we can freely proselytize in China. If I had to hazard a guess, and it is only a guess. That time isn't too far off.

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OK to spell it out. There are members of the church in China. In the church every member is a missionary. Ergo we have missionaries where ever there are church members therefore we have missionaries in China..

Let us suppose that the church specifically tells us, because of the laws of a country, that we cannot mention our religion even if asked by friends and associates. They have made an agreement with those countries in order to have a peaceful relationship with them== China, Saudi Arabia, and Israel, among others.

But you don't care what the church tells you, because you are a "member missionary". You can make up your own rules, regardless of the laws of the land, and the promises the church has made.

The church has made an agreement with the Chinese government, has kept their promise, and going around blathering dangerous nonsense is not helpful.

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Let us suppose that the church specifically tells us, because of the laws of a country, that we cannot mention our religion even if asked by friends and associates. They have made an agreement with those countries in order to have a peaceful relationship with them== China, Saudi Arabia, and Israel, among others.

But you don't care what the church tells you, because you are a "member missionary". You can make up your own rules, regardless of the laws of the land, and the promises the church has made.

The church has made an agreement with the Chinese government, has kept their promise, and you go around blathering dangerous nonsense.

Lets suppose you are a member of the church and are having a dinner conversation with family and friends and one of them asks you a direct question. You are really going to say "Sorry I can't talk about that". Come now, I was born at night but not last night. Is one of the temple recommend questions in China "Do you refrain from talking about the church to everyone, even if the ask".

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Lets suppose you are a member of the church and are having a dinner conversation with family and friends and one of them asks you a direct question. You are really going to say "Sorry I can't talk about that".

I could say that if I were really stupid, but, depending on the direct question, I could think of an appropriate answer. Word of Wisdom issues have several ways of handling that situation, on a question about religion would be "I am a Christian". Then quickly change the subject.

Just a matter of common sense.

Come now, I was born at night but not last night. Is one of the temple recommend questions in China "Do you refrain from talking about the church to everyone, even if the ask".

This is really getting silly.

I think that supporting the church leaders is a question asked both in China and the United States. I think we have reached the end of this line of discussion.

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This is really getting silly.

I can certainly agree and was just trying to point out the silliness of your position. It might help to understand how the Chinese government approaches the enforcement of this policy. Here is a link that might help in understanding that the policy prohibits public proselytizing and what actually happens.

http://www.unhcr.org...8631d828,0.html

As you can see and as I pointed out there is plenty of room for missionary work by individuals in China.

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My in-laws are in Shen Zhen. From what they say, even if you're offered alcohol you can only decline. You can't decline stating religious belief.

Anyhow, when the church finally does go in to China you won't be seeing this massive influx like everyone seems to assume, much like in Pakistan. You'll likely see the branches get a few sets of missionaries, which I would guess would come from places like Hong Kong and Taiwan and then we'd just send more North Americans to those countries. It will start small and progress at a sustainable rate, not 1/4 of all missionaries as many postulate based solely on population numbers.

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