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Christian Right Failed To Sway Voters


Sky

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An interesting read from the New York Times....

What are your thoughts, particularly as it relates to Mormons? While Mormons may not be a part of the Christian Right, they both tend to vote the same way.

How does the Republican Party adapt to changing viewpoints on social issues and changing demographics without alienating their religious base?

My opinion is that this election was less about abortion and same-sex marriage, and more about the role of government and who was better suited to fix the economy.

Thanks in advance for sharing your viewpoint!

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The Republican Old Guard needs to take the party back. The far-right has hijacked far too much of the party agenda. The Tea Party came in with their "no compromise" approach and nutcases of Dominionist theology somehow got a seat at the table. The Republican Party Platform is a barrel of laughs and contradictions. Read it some time if you are bored. They also somehow got the idea that the current tax burden is intolerable when it is at its lowest since World War II. They pretend to glorify Reagan when Reagan would be seen by many of them as a traitor with his tax increases and even higher tax burden on the wealthy. The Right needs to ignore the extremists and just take their vote while not letting them take any say like the Left does with their extremists (communists, socialists, etc.)

The Party needs to understand that the religious base is not enough to win elections and diversify a bit to appeal to others.

They also need to get their candidates to stop saying stupid stuff all the time that they don't mean or stop saying what they believe (whichever is the case). One online discussion I found amusing and depressing:

"The Republican rape congressman lost."

"Which one?"

The Republican party also desperately needs to diversify and court the African American and Hispanic votes, many of whom agree with the Republican Party on many issues. I think spearheading bringing Puerto Rico into statehood would be a nice start. They also need to alienate the racists from the party by much more strongly condemning them and getting them out of the party. Realistically they will still vote Republican but again, do not give them a seat at the table or any power or say in party policy.

In my opinion they also need to fixate less on principles of devotion to idealistic systems and more on practicality. Most people don't care about some imaginary war between capitalism versus socialism. They want a workable system even if it is a bastardized mix of the two.

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They also somehow got the idea that the current tax burden is intolerable when it is at its lowest since World War II.
I think I will indulge just this time in a little purely political commentary...

The Tea Party lost credibility with me when they were asked if they were given a choice of a personal tax cut or paying down the deficit, which would they take and they overwhelmingly chose the tax cut. Showed me it wasn't about making the country stronger as much as personal benefit for the majority.

I agree with your suggestions.

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Sky:

The Religious Right in this country has consigned the Mormons to non-Christian dangerous cult status, and condemned us to their version of Hell. As far as politics goes it does indeed make for strange bedfellows.

I am not quite sure what you mean by this statement especailly as it relates to this article.

During the Republican primaries, some commentators said that Mr. Romney’s Mormon faith would drive away evangelicals, many of whom consider his church a heretical cult.

And yet, in the end, evangelicals voted overwhelmingly for Mr. Romney — even matching the presidential vote of Mormons: 78 percent for Mr. Romney and 21 percent for Mr. Obama, according to exit polls by Edison Research.

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  • 1 month later...
How does the Republican Party adapt to changing viewpoints on social issues and changing demographics without alienating their religious base?

I think the main problem was getting out the vote (a process which apparently stalled due to a software failure). Romney won the middle-class and higher economic classes. I've been advocating for years that the GOP target minorities because by and large, their values are pretty conservative and the only thing keeping them away is the entitlement mentality fostered by the Democrats. There is also a huge untapped well of non voters. I get the impression that non voting is often driven by the largely erroneous, though sometime justified, perception that the parties are the same.

Romney also won the religious vote. IIRC Catholics by 11 and Protestants by 4. It's the irreligious vote that was lost:

The big demographic story out of the 2012 presidential election may have been President Obama's domination of the Hispanic vote, and rightfully so.

But as we close the book on the election, it bears noting that another less obvious bloc of key swing state voters helped the president win a second term.

They're the "nones" — that's the Pew Research Center's shorthand for the growing number of American voters who don't have a specific religious affiliation. Some are agnostic, some atheist, but more than half define themselves as either "religious" or "spiritual but not religious," Pew found in a recent survey.

They are typically younger, more socially liberal than their forebears, vote Democratic, and now make up nearly 20 percent of the country's population. Exit polls suggest that 12 percent of voters on Election Day were counted as "religiously unaffiliated."

"This really is a striking development in American politics," says Gregory Smith of the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. "There's no question that the religiously unaffiliated are a very important, politically consequential group."

The religiously unaffiliated voters are almost as strongly Democratic as white evangelicals are Republican, polls show.

Their overwhelming support of Obama proved crucial in a number of swing states where the president lost both the Catholic and Protestant vote by single and low-double digits, but won the "nones" by capturing 70-plus percent of their votes.

http://www.conservat...-flock-to-obama

The Presidential election wasn't a bad loss for the GOP numbers-wise so I don't think the GOP needs to change the platform. What's the point of having another party anyway? They need to increase outreach and they need to provide an alternative to the constant left-wing anti cultural (anti LDS by extension) drumbeat emanating from the media and Hollywood. AM talk radio is not enough.

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I agree with you, Sky, the election was not about morals and everything to do with the economy. As a lifelong conservative I have nothing in common with a Republican Party that cannot understand the need to raise taxes. Yes, our political system is a pig sty of waste, but we don't have another one around. Regardless, taxes need to be raised and the rich should pay far more than they are paying today. The divide between the rich and the poor is getting wider and that is not healthy for an egalitarian society such as ours. We have long had a graduated income tax because we as a people believe the rich should pay more than the poor. In closing, our Republican candidate did a lousy job of taking policy decisions and proved he was out of touch with society at large. Unfortunately, in losing the economic side of the debate, they also lost the battle on socially conservative issues. I want to vote for a fiscally conservative candidate that understands the importance of getting our deficit under control. There remains a legitimate discussion to be had on social issues and there are solutions without denying perceived rights to any citizen.

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An interesting read from the New York Times....

What are your thoughts, particularly as it relates to Mormons? While Mormons may not be a part of the Christian Right, they both tend to vote the same way.

How does the Republican Party adapt to changing viewpoints on social issues and changing demographics without alienating their religious base?

My opinion is that this election was less about abortion and same-sex marriage, and more about the role of government and who was better suited to fix the economy.

Thanks in advance for sharing your viewpoint!

I think this mans when it comes to voting no one has a leader who tells them how to vote.
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I also don't really comment on political party issues, but I would like to say a few things since the moderators seem to be allowing that. This may surprise a few members of this board, but I am also a fiscal conservative. I believe in less government, balanced budget and fiscal responsibility. I voted for many years as a Republican until I realized that the Republican party does not actually believe in any of those things. We have never had a Republican administration that was fiscal conservative for decades. No Republican administration dramatically cut government waste and lived within this countries financial means. When was the last time Republicans cut government waste dramatically? There have been plenty of opportunities where the Republicans controlled both congress and the presidency but nothing really happened. Was there much fiscal responsibility going on under George W. Bush when both the house and senate was controlled by the Republicans? I don't think so. Did Romney campaign on a clear outline of what he would cut and what he would leave? In short, Republicans say they are fiscal conservative, but it seems the only thing they are consistent at is "we want less taxes" Well who doesn't, but that doesn't mean you are fiscal responsible. Is all it means is that you want to hang on to as much of your money as you can. Are the Democrats any better? Absolutely not. Both parties spend like drunken sailors. If the Republican party was really a party of fiscal conservatism they have a great opportunity to cut, cut, cut right now to avoid the fiscal cliff. Who cares if the rich get taxed more. It is not like this government is going to have an excess of money. Why not lead the way to do both things instead of stubbornly advocating one thing, no tax cuts. If I was running the Republican part right now, I would cut every area of government until it hurt. When people believe that the government is serious about actually governing, then paying more in taxes is more understandable. It is exactly why California got a tax increase. It only could have happened after Governor Brown cut government until it hurt everywhere. Oddly enough he is a Democrat. He is doing the hard work that the previous Republican Governor couldn't do.

So why did the Democrats win? Because people also believe in their social agenda. When the difference economically between the two parties is really no different, the only thing you have to vote on are the social issues. More people believe in the Democrats social philosophy than in the Republican's.

Ok enough ranting about government failure. Carry on.

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Perhaps to pull this thread back from the political cliff == we in the GOP have often looked to some great leader to bring out of the morass of immorality and laws and rules which take away our freedom. But that day is now gone. We are facing a future where we have moving rapidly into the Sodom and Gomorrah as predicted by the scripture and there is no "great leader" today is out there to save us from ourselves. Rhetoric and clever words have replaced leadership and integrity. Honor is no longer important in a political leader.

We as a country have made decisions where we went beyond the "tipping point" spoke of by the BOM -- where the 50 percent choose evil. The weather events have been giving us a warning of what it to come, but the secularists call it "global warming'.

There is no salvation except for the coming of the King to rescue us, but that is a long way off. The church has made it possible to call many more missionaries to prepare the way.

Just my feeling on the situation.

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Perhaps to pull this thread back from the political cliff == we in the GOP have often looked to some great leader to bring out of the morass of immorality and laws and rules which take away our freedom. But that day is now gone. We are facing a future where we have moving rapidly into the Sodom and Gomorrah as predicted by the scripture and there is no "great leader" today is out there to save us from ourselves. Rhetoric and clever words have replaced leadership and integrity. Honor is no longer important in a political leader.

We as a country have made decisions where we went beyond the "tipping point" spoke of by the BOM -- where the 50 percent choose evil. The weather events have been giving us a warning of what it to come, but the secularists call it "global warming'.

I have no doubt a "great leader" will come to try to save the right. Sadly he will probably not be as wacky as the last "great leader" and will probably not have a charming Charlie Chaplin mustache.

I disagree that we "chose evil" as a nation. We chose one of two mixtures of good and evil. I am not sure which was worst.

I also have no problem with climate change also being the judgment of God.

Also I see no way your post could be taken as pulling away from the political cliff.

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