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Article Says There Are 11 Diseases Coffee Can Prevent


Tacenda

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There is an article in the Salt Lake Tribune below, that says the church declined to say what ingredient is harmful in coffee and tea. Which brings me to the latter article that says there are 11 diseases that coffee can prevent. Now the question, do we have anyone on this board that might be able to give an answer? I'm interested because one of the diseases listed is Alzheimer's (runs in my family) but it says the caffeine might be the factor, which I already get in soft drinks. But in my opinion is probably worse than coffee! Or is there an ingredient in coffee that hasn't been studied? My husband works with a chemist and the chemist said there are some ingredients or an ingredient in coffee that can be harmful. Could it be the way the coffee is brewed that can make it harmful?

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/54897327-78/health-coffee-disease-tea.html.csp?page=3

http://xfinity.comcast.net/blogs/lifestyle/2012/10/01/11-diseases-coffee-can-prevent/?cid=hero_media

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Tacenda:

The amount of caffeine in soft drinks is a fraction of that of coffee. That doesn't mean they're particularly good for you considering the sugar/aspartame in them.

http://www.cspinet.o...ew/cafchart.htm

however, some energy drinks have the caffeine of 8 cups of coffee yet energy drinks haven't been banned (although you could argue that they have been discouraged)

Just because something has a positive effect on the body does not mean it does not also have negative effects. formaldehyde is really good at keeping things fresh but I wouldn't recommend it.

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Are these benefits only found in coffee and nothing else?

I have seen reports stating that wine is good for ones health, in moderation. Those who wrote the report ranted and raved at the awesome benefits of drinking a glass or two of wine everyday. Funny thing is, at the end of the report, they also said that drinking dark grape juice and some other fruit juices, which were unfermented, provided the same benefits also.

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Sure it might be able to prevent certain diseases, but caffeine can also kill you.

http://www.energyfie...ath-by-caffeine

It doesn't tell you what time period you would have to drink it in to kill you. Its 123 (roughly) cans of redbull but is that at once? over an hour? over a week? I dont think I could drink that much at once if I tried. Water can also kill you if you drink enough in a short enough period of time.

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however, some energy drinks have the caffeine of 8 cups of coffee yet energy drinks haven't been banned (although you could argue that they have been discouraged)

Just because something has a positive effect on the body does not mean it does not also have negative effects. formaldehyde is really good at keeping things fresh but I wouldn't recommend it.

I've never had one of those energy drinks. The people I've talked to either love them or hate them based on taste. I find a nice meal and a short nap works for me.

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There is an article in the Salt Lake Tribune below, that says the church declined to say what ingredient is harmful in coffee and tea.

There may not be an actual ingredient in coffee and tea that is inherently harmful. Many of the ingredients probably can and do provide health benefits when used in moderation. I think it is very difficult though for those who are accustomed to drinking coffee to do so in moderation. If you are asking whether it would be possible for someone to drink coffee or tea for medicinal purposes and still be obeying the word of wisdom, the answer as far as I understand it is yes. If proscribed by a doctor or other medical professional, the use of coffee or tea would be completely in keeping with the word or wisdom. Just be careful to follow the label closely about how many times each day to take your dose.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints does not proclaim that coffee and tea are inherently evil, nor that their use is inherently sinful. God has not said that the use of coffee and tea is inherently a sin. The word of wisdom is as much a cultural and spiritual commandment as it is a physical one. It is a kin, though not exactly the same as the commandment of circumcision given anciently to Israel. God did not inherently believe the foreskin of the penis was evil, yet if someone was unwilling to remove theirs anciently it would have resulted in serious spiritual consequences.

In many aspects the word of wisdom is similar to circumcision, in that it creates a unique cultural trait that separates the members of the Church of Jesus Christ from the rest of the world. It is also something that God asks us to observe in part to test our willingness to obey his commandments. Just be thankful that when a new convert joins the church, God no longer asks him to drop his pants and undergo surgery. I can only imagine the discussions that occurred anciently "Now what is the health benefit of this procedure again?".

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http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/h/hemloc18.html

Socrates' death is described at the end of Plato's Phaedo. Socrates turned down the pleas of Crito to attempt an escape from prison. After drinking the poison, he was instructed to walk around until his legs felt numb. After he lay down, the man who administered the poison pinched his foot. Socrates could no longer feel his legs. The numbness slowly crept up his body until it reached his heart. Shortly before his death, Socrates speaks his last words to Crito: "Crito, we owe a rooster to Asclepius. Please, don't forget to pay the debt." Asclepius was the Greek god for curing illness, and it is likely Socrates' last words meant that death is the cure—and freedom, of the soul from the body. Additionally, in Why Socrates Died: Dispelling the Myths, Robin Waterfield adds another interpretation of Socrates' last words. He suggests that Socrates was a voluntary scapegoat; his death was the purifying remedy for Athens’ misfortunes. In this view, the token of appreciation for Asclepius would represent a cure for the ailments of Athens.[14]

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In hindsight we can look upon commands the Lord has given without scrutinization. For instance, the command to abstain from pork products under the law of Moses. We accept that generally that God commanded and men obeyed. In our day, we tend to come up with arbitrary answers and assumptions for why the Lord commands some things. Then, from these assumptions we then take random components to be some type of measurement of the assumptions (for instance, we look at alcohol's effect on some narrow component of health and then generalize the results across the board). The command to abstain from pork products probably had very little to do with keeping Israel's cholesterol levels lower or preventing the spread of trichinosis, but those were probably beneficial byproducts. If they were to assume abstaining from pork was primarily about their LDL cholesterol levels they would have surely been missing the mark. So to with us, especially as any given substance is good for some things and bad for others. It's not the substance's inherent properties that our focus should be placed upon, rather the covenants we honor as we see past the temporal components of spiritual commands.

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The reasons for the coffee and tea interpretation as "hot drinks" of Brigham's day may have nothing to do with what is in them. It may simply be the hot drinks, which were the common drinks of the day. Even today we may have hot chocolate but almost never drink it as hot as coffee or tea. Anyone remember the lady who sued McDonald's because hot coffee spilled and burned her.

Furthermore I think the WOW is as much a law to set the saints apart from the world as the dietary laws of Moses were in his day. Almost always when I have told someone I don't drink coffee they say, "Are you Mormon?" So aside from any health issues it is a law today of obedience.

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The reasons for the coffee and tea interpretation as "hot drinks" of Brigham's day may have nothing to do with what is in them. It may simply be the hot drinks, which were the common drinks of the day. Even today we may have hot chocolate but almost never drink it as hot as coffee or tea. Anyone remember the lady who sued McDonald's because hot coffee spilled and burned her.

Furthermore I think the WOW is as much a law to set the saints apart from the world as the dietary laws of Moses were in his day. Almost always when I have told someone I don't drink coffee they say, "Are you Mormon?" So aside from any health issues it is a law today of obedience.

There is an old rumor that they made the "hot drinks" part of the WoW since that would mean tea, a beverage the women enjoyed.

Supposedly Emma had had it after cleaning up after the brethren when they would spit tobacco on the floor during their meetings and she spoke with Joseph about it and thus the WoW came about. So since the men would have to give up tobacco so would the women have to give up "hot drinks" or tea.

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There is an old rumor that they made the "hot drinks" part of the WoW since that would mean tea, a beverage the women enjoyed. Since Emma had had it after cleaning up after the brethren when they would spit tobacco on the floor during their meetings and she spoke with Joseph, so since the men would have to give up tobacco so would the women have to give up "hot drinks" or tea.

Tea was enjoyed by both sexes, so I don't think there is anything to the rumour.

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There is an article in the Salt Lake Tribune below, that says the church declined to say what ingredient is harmful in coffee and tea. Which brings me to the latter article that says there are 11 diseases that coffee can prevent. Now the question, do we have anyone on this board that might be able to give an answer? I'm interested because one of the diseases listed is Alzheimer's (runs in my family) but it says the caffeine might be the factor, which I already get in soft drinks. But in my opinion is probably worse than coffee! Or is there an ingredient in coffee that hasn't been studied? My husband works with a chemist and the chemist said there are some ingredients or an ingredient in coffee that can be harmful. Could it be the way the coffee is brewed that can make it harmful?

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/54897327-78/health-coffee-disease-tea.html.csp?page=3

http://xfinity.comcast.net/blogs/lifestyle/2012/10/01/11-diseases-coffee-can-prevent/?cid=hero_media

The issue I have with such studies...if this were so Doctors would be prescribing it like other drugs. I am taking insulin when coffee can keep me alive?
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