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A Push To Caffeinate Byu'S Campus


Tacenda

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Where did someone say there was no demand?

I've always assumed that there were contradictory demands (including costs vs. profits as well as demands from various members of the customer base not to have caffeine on campus...the "didn't want" as an active, not a passive comment) that weighted the no caffeine demands higher than the caffeine.

I can see how the comment "It’s because consumers simply didn’t want it" gives that impression, but that is an overly simplified paraphrase in my view of the actual official comment which is more precisely phrased:

“This was a decision based on customer needs and desires by our Dining Services department,” BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins told FOX 13 on Friday.
And it is made clear by her additional clarification.
Jenkins said she has received a few phone calls and e-mails from people who would like to see a caffeinated campus. But she has also heard from those who like a caffeine-free BYU.

“Of course, some are saying ‘I’d like to raise my voice in support,’ and some are saying ‘We appreciate you not serving caffeinated beverages,’ ” she said.

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Why don't they just take a campus survey and see if there is enough of a market for it, to be viable?

I don't understand the people who are "appreciating a caffeine free campus", when the leadership has clearly stated, these beverages are not against the WofW...?

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I don't understand the people who are "appreciating a caffeine free campus", when the leadership has clearly stated, these beverages are not against the WofW...?

I am not sure about this myself. Are they concerned that they or others won't be able to resist the temptation and people will get addicted and so they believe it is better healthwise, even if it is not a commandment, to avoid having it around?
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I'm thinking that down the road change will come. Not immediately according to the spokesperson for BYU because they are concentrating on the food part right now.

I think it may depend in part on how much of a fuss some people put up about it...while I wish such did not have influence on an organization's decision, the hassle factor (how much of a hassle/extra effort unrelated to the actual product's production does it cause) does play into it and not wanting to have to spend time attempting to soothe disturbed feelings by those who are overzealous in the matter is going to be a part of the decision process, I suspect.
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Why don't they just take a campus survey and see if there is enough of a market for it, to be viable?

I don't understand the people who are "appreciating a caffeine free campus", when the leadership has clearly stated, these beverages are not against the WofW...?

Uh yeah just read the article. A single students web site and 1333 like comments do not a big demand for a product make. This looks like a slow news day.

Perhaps if it is that important he can attend the UofU and enjoy his caffeinated beverages without trouble?

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Honestly, I hate that I have to have a Diet Dr. Pepper everyday to cope. And hate for anyone else to depend on caffeine. So I see that once it's acceptable at BYU and the church it may just create the habit in the non drinker. Having non caffeinated beverages sent out clear messages to the students for so long now.

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I am not sure about this myself. Are they concerned that they or others won't be able to resist the temptation and people will get addicted and so they believe it is better healthwise, even if it is not a commandment, to avoid having it around?

Possibly. I am just thinking that old habits die hard. :)

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Honestly, I hate that I have to have a Diet Dr. Pepper everyday to cope. And hate for anyone else to depend on caffeine. So I see that once it's acceptable at BYU and the church it may just create the habit in the non drinker. Having non caffeinated beverages sent out clear messages to the students for so long now.

Seems like a lot of students and probably faculty are already enjoying caffeine. They just have to bring it in or get it off campus.

I think you would have to have a lot more than just one Diet Dr. Pepper a day to be truly addicted. Before I joined the church, I drank coffee all day long, at work. I really thought it would be difficult to quit...but, it wasn't. I quit cold turkey and I still very rarely drink coffee. I do drink tea, though...mostly in the winter...mostly decaffeinated.

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I think you would have to have a lot more than just one Diet Dr. Pepper a day to be truly addicted.
Depends on the person. Most people, I would agree with you, though if it had been going on long enough, it might trigger rebound headaches or something for a few days if they were prone to them. And there is psychological dependence as well as a physical need, don't forget.
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Seems like a lot of students and probably faculty are already enjoying caffeine. They just have to bring it in or get it off campus.

I think you would have to have a lot more than just one Diet Dr. Pepper a day to be truly addicted. Before I joined the church, I drank coffee all day long, at work. I really thought it would be difficult to quit...but, it wasn't. I quit cold turkey and I still very rarely drink coffee. I do drink tea, though...mostly in the winter...mostly decaffeinated.

I wish I could stop at just one. I will usually down about a liter throughout the day. I'd be better off drinking caffeinated tea. With all the chemicals that are in pop.

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--

I can see it now. 30,000 +/- students and staff carrying their little containers of caffinated beverages to class each morning,just like the people in office towers all over the US. And they say it is not addicting. Pshaw!

They could have Starbucks kiosks set up along the way to the Bookstore and Library...

Depends on the person. Most people, I would agree with you, though if it had been going on long enough, it might trigger rebound headaches or something for a few days if they were prone to them. And there is psychological dependence as well as a physical need, don't forget.

I always viewed caffeine as being off limits because it is a stimulant, and the WoW is more about "strong" drinks and alcohol because they are stimulants and/or can be addictive... just because the wording doesn't stipulate "caffeine" per se does not mean we shouldn't view things in context of the principle the WoW lays out... In my inactive days, I really couldn't get going in the morning without that shot of strong black coffee. When I reactivated I really did go through a withdrawal of sorts with headaches, nervousness, etc . Same with when I quit smoking... and gave up alcohol. Just like there's no specific mention of a number of things available in society today... some energy drinks for instance... we must use our judgment on these things in relation to the principles of the WoW. Just like Joseph said... "We teach them correct principles, and they govern themselves."

I really don't care how many leaders say caffeine is okay... I follow the spirit vs the letter of the law when it comes to WoW..

GG

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I may be overly sensitive to caffeine, I don't know whether it was from lack of exposure in my youth or not. I've had some really bad reactions to it when I initially started seeing if it could help with alertness. It would be interesting to see a study done on reactions to caffeine in brand new users like we know of smoking (the body has to get used to the toxin before it stops making one sick) but with the prevalence of caffeine in soda it would be a hard study to conduct (finding subjects who were both caffeine-virgins and willing to be tested) even among children. We only had cola in the house when someone was stomach sick. No one that I know of in the family actually likes the taste and drinks it for that, I don't believe it was for any other reason my parents didn't have it as I never remember them saying "no" to someone asking for cola at a fast food joint....though my dad usually brought along milk to save money besides my mother being very health conscious). I have in the past taken it so I can function without sufficient sleep though it has gotten to the point where all it does these days is give me jitters so the only thing I do take it for nowadays...and thankfully this is very rare now...are severe migraines that noncaffeinated painkillers don't touch.

I do wonder how typical I am and how long it would take for the jitters to disappear if I took it everyday.

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I can see it now. 30,000 +/- students and staff carrying their little containers of caffinated beverages to class each morning,just like the people in office towers all over the US. And they say it is not addicting. Pshaw!

It can be addicting but for many it is not. I. Like the occasional Mountain Dew but I do not need it. I would like to think the Saints are able to recognize their own addictions and adapt accordingly without needing this oversight. Then again we are talking about BYU here. The school where adults are treated like children because the parents insist on protection over self-control. I am glad I did not attend.

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I may be overly sensitive to caffeine, I don't know whether it was from lack of exposure in my youth or not. I've had some really bad reactions to it when I initially started seeing if it could help with alertness. It would be interesting to see a study done on reactions to caffeine in brand new users like we know of smoking (the body has to get used to the toxin before it stops making one sick) but with the prevalence of caffeine in soda it would be a hard study to conduct (finding subjects who were both caffeine-virgins and willing to be tested) even among children. We only had cola in the house when someone was stomach sick. No one that I know of in the family actually likes the taste and drinks it for that, I don't believe it was for any other reason my parents didn't have it as I never remember them saying "no" to someone asking for cola at a fast food joint....though my dad usually brought along milk to save money besides my mother being very health conscious). I have in the past taken it so I can function without sufficient sleep though it has gotten to the point where all it does these days is give me jitters so the only thing I do take it for nowadays...and thankfully this is very rare now...are severe migraines that noncaffeinated painkillers don't touch.

I do wonder how typical I am and how long it would take for the jitters to disappear if I took it everyday.

They would find the perfect subject in most of my in-laws!

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It might be useful to look at what the Church actually said. In response to the Rock Center assertion that the Church prohibits caffeine, the Church writes:

Finally, another small correction: Despite what was reported, the Church revelation spelling out health practices (Doctrine and Covenants 89) does not mention the use of caffeine. The Church’s health guidelines prohibit alcoholic drinks, smoking or chewing of tobacco, and “hot drinks” — taught by Church leaders to refer specifically to tea and coffee.

The statement does not attempt to address multiple comments by some of the brethren over the years regarding caffeine and the Spirit of the Law. I think it comes down to a personal decision. BYU will likely continue to remain caffeine-free. BYU is not noteworthy for being on the cutting edge of change. It is rather conservative.

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They would find the perfect subject in most of my in-laws!

You think your in-laws would be wiling to violate their interpretation of the Wow (I am assuming this is why they don't take it considering how you've described them) for the cause of science?
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You think your in-laws would be wiling to violate their interpretation of the Wow (I am assuming this is why they don't take it considering how you've described them) for the cause of science?

If you are going to sin in the name of science at least make it a good sin like fornication or murder. Any scientific studies like that need volunteers?

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You think your in-laws would be wiling to violate their interpretation of the Wow (I am assuming this is why they don't take it considering how you've described them) for the cause of science?

Well probably not. My mother in law is extremely health concious and is alway giving me literature on the harmful effects of pop, from the carbonation being harmful to the nutri sweet in the diet drinks I drink. I don't know if it's the WOW so much, but more that they are very health concious people. It may have started out being the WOW though.

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