Jump to content

Why Is So Much Money Spent On Campaigns?


Tacenda

Recommended Posts

This morning in Utah, they had on the news the fact that Paul Ryan is flying in today to speak at Utah Valley University in the Orem/Provo area. And later on tonight there is a fundraiser dinner that charges $25,000.00 a plate. And there are plenty that are attending, wow!

Everyone knows the amount spent on these campaigns. Is this just plain sick? To me it is. I wish it weren't so. What are the expenses on these campaigns that cost so most? Is it the commercials they make? Travel?

Link to comment

This morning in Utah, they had on the news the fact that Paul Ryan is flying in today to speak at Utah Valley University in the Orem/Provo area. And later on tonight there is a fundraiser dinner that charges $25,000.00 a plate. And there are plenty that are attending, wow!

Everyone knows the amount spent on these campaigns. Is this just plain sick? To me it is. I wish it weren't so. What are the expenses on these campaigns that cost so most? Is it the commercials they make? Travel?

That is what I loved about the Canadian system, campaigns could only last for six weeks so there was a definite limit on spending. However, their Prime Minister is the leader of the most popular party and thus doesn't provide any 'check and balance' on the Congress such as can happen here. The parties also seem to have a lot more influence on a MP voting.

My more ideal world would be a mix of Canadian and American political policies/culture....but alas that isn't going to happen anytime soon and if it does happen, it is likely the worst that will be transported to the other country, not the best.

Link to comment

That is what I loved about the Canadian system, campaigns could only last for six weeks so there was a definite limit on spending. However, their Prime Minister is the leader of the most popular party and thus doesn't provide any 'check and balance' on the Congress such as can happen here. The parties also seem to have a lot more influence on a MP voting.

My more ideal world would be a mix of Canadian and American political policies/culture....but alas that isn't going to happen anytime soon and if it does happen, it is likely the worst that will be transported to the other country, not the best.

If you think this is personal or too political to bring up please ignore this possibly very rude question. What do you think about Obamacare or if individual states make sure their citizens have health insurance? My two married children currently don't have health care. One because of loss of job and the other the employer doesn't offer it and they can't afford to pay for private insurance. So of course I'm open to possibilties of Obamacare if done appropiately. I'm aware that Canada has a similar health care system. In your opinion now that you live in the US but are a former Canadian, is it a good system, the one in Canada? Very long drawn out question, I apologise.

Link to comment

Everyone knows the amount spent on these campaigns. Is this just plain sick? To me it is. I wish it weren't so. What are the expenses on these campaigns that cost so most? Is it the commercials they make? Travel?

http://www.msnbc.msn...o/#.UEeaK41lQaE

As a general rule, 75 percent of a campaign’s outlays will ultimately go to paid communication: direct mail, radio, television and Internet ads, said Craig Smith, the campaign manager for Sen. Joe Lieberman’s presidential effort in 2003-2004.

How Do You Spend $1 Billion in a White House Race Anyway?

Link to comment

Tacenda:

I'll let Calmoriah answer for him/herself about what happens in Canada. But it is a misnomer to call it Obamacare. It is the Affordable Care Act. It is virtually the same legislation that Romney signed in Massachusetts including the individual mandate.

I'd love a Canadian Single Payer type program, better yet the French version, here in the US. Medicare for all, tied to citizenship and not employment.

Link to comment

If you think this is personal or too political to bring up please ignore this possibly very rude question. What do you think about Obamacare or if individual states make sure their citizens have health insurance? My two married children currently don't have health care. One because of loss of job and the other the employer doesn't offer it and they can't afford to pay for private insurance. So of course I'm open to possibilties of Obamacare if done appropiately. I'm aware that Canada has a similar health care system. In your opinion now that you live in the US but are a former Canadian, is it a good system, the one in Canada? Very long drawn out question, I apologise.

It was very good to take care of the usual stuff, anything out of the ordinary unfortunately has gotten much more difficult to get quality care in a expeditious way.

I was also quite shocked at how behind Canada was in some ways medically to the States when we moved back down.

I was predisposed to like many thing healthwise about the way Canada does things due to having great experiences with doctors and treatments when we first moved up there in contrast to the States (and there are a few things I still think they do better like malpractice lawsuits being very rare) but thirteen years later when we moved back down, it had really changed. For example, my daughter would not have been able to gotten on the pump for her diabetes until she was 18 and showed perfect control of her sugars (the pump is to help with control, this limitation makes no sense, the justification is so that kids won't get carried away with all the freedom....yea, having to take shots and not being able to take that second piece of pizza if they want or having to eat that second piece of pizza even if they are full because they gave themselves the insulin already is going to make them more responsible rather than just blowing the whole thing off as too complicated).

Again I think what would work best is more of a mix of the way Canada does things, but in this case leaning more to the way the US does it simply because of what longtime experience of not being able to fund such programs. And funding has a huge effect on the quality of care, if you have an issue later in the year when the funding has already dried up, you may be in big trouble. We had a friend who was a pediatric neurologist who basically worked for free for the last three months of the year, he had a large family and lived in what was lower middle class housing, was not extravagant in any way in their living style who decided to move to the States because he couldn't afford to send all his children on a mission or to college....a pediatric neurologist in financial hardship!!!!!

I also belong to an elist for my sleep/neurological disorder that is international and there are some definite benefits to being in the States as far as certain medicines and treatments being available, but sometimes other places are more advanced. I would not want to live in England with this disorder unless I was very rich and could afford to pay for meds out of my own pocket, for example.

Took me three months to get a CT scan to rule out brain tumours for my constant headache/dizziness; took 9 months for a friend to have reconstructive surgery done on her stomach (she had back issues, her muscles had been overstretched by pregnancy). My husband got treatment for his snoring in less than a year due to participating in a funded study, he was able to get on a CPap right away when the tested treatment didn't work because he was already a patient, otherwise he would have been on a waiting list to become a patient for at least a year. Down here, he called up and got into a doctor and sleep study within a week. This was in Alberta which had a much better record at the time than some other provinces due to its high income from oil revenues, etc.

At this point, it is a question of lower quality care for everyone or higher quality care to those who can afford it either through insurance or being well off enough to pay for it themselves. The US insurance industry needs to be revamped so that a larger percentage can afford the higher quality care, high malpractice costs raise the overall cost of insurance too high. I think more variety of insurance options should be available and those in high risk groups by choice (such as smoking or high risk sports and sexual/drug behaviours) should be paying much higher premiums.

Link to comment

It was very good to take care of the usual stuff, anything out of the ordinary unfortunately has gotten much more difficult to get quality care in a expeditious way.

I was also quite shocked at how behind Canada was in some ways medically to the States when we moved back down.

I was predisposed to like many thing healthwise about the way Canada does things due to having great experiences with doctors and treatments when we first moved up there in contrast to the States (and there are a few things I still think they do better like malpractice lawsuits being very rare) but thirteen years later when we moved back down, it had really changed. For example, my daughter would not have been able to gotten on the pump for her diabetes until she was 18 and showed perfect control of her sugars (the pump is to help with control, this limitation makes no sense, the justification is so that kids won't get carried away with all the freedom....yea, having to take shots and not being able to take that second piece of pizza if they want or having to eat that second piece of pizza even if they are full because they gave themselves the insulin already is going to make them more responsible rather than just blowing the whole thing off as too complicated).

Again I think what would work best is more of a mix of the way Canada does things, but in this case leaning more to the way the US does it simply because of what longtime experience of not being able to fund such programs.

I also belong to an elist for my sleep/neurological disorder that is international and there are some definite benefits to being in the States as far as certain medicines and treatments being available, but sometimes other places are more advanced. I would not want to live in England with this disorder unless I was very rich and could afford to pay for meds out of my own pocket, for example.

Thanks for the answer to my question. Sounds like it's going to be a tough go if the US goes this route. To make it the best system possible.

Link to comment

Just as the robber barons on the Rhein controlled and taxed [on pain of confiscation] all commercial traffic, so do the media today control and tax [on pain of marginalization to the point of invisibility] all political speech.

If you want to complain . . . complain about/to the ones who profit, not about/to the ones who have to pay.

Link to comment

I added a few points to my comments btw.

I agree it is going to be hard for the US to go the route, especially if the lawmakers don't fix what is wrong with the current system and that gets carried over to a more socialized system.

I think socialism works better in smaller, more controlled groups where there can be effective oversight. In a large group there is too much opportunity to take advantage of the system which shortchanges those who actually need it. Canada has a huge problem imo with their welfare system where there is a huge gap of income between those who are on the program and those who are trying to get off. For example, rent went up about a $1000 a month for a friend who was trying to become more independent just because she got a parttime job. She couldn't keep the job because the increase in expenses that had been covered by welfare were more than her increased income level....just made no sense to have no incentive beyond personal pride to get off the system.

People were calling the ambulance for simple things they could have been driven in for (such as a simple broken leg) or using the emergency room for colds and other everyday stuff. There needed to be a penalty/fee for using emergency resources for nonemergency issues because it tied things up. We had a friend that was having a stroke, had been diagnosed with a stroke by paramedics (he had lost the ability to speak) and it took him a couple of hours to be seen by a doctor once he hit the emergency room...time that makes a huge different in stroke victims.

I love the Canadian people and their desire to create a community that cares for all of its people, I love the idea of socialized medicine....I just don't see it as being viable in the long run in most of the places I've seen it (granted that is pretty much limited to Russia and Canada...but if Canada can't make it work, I don't see the US being able to).

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...