Jump to content

Share Your Scout Horror Stories


Recommended Posts

From the first link.

I think the problem, when it occurs, is from untrained leaders. The level of Scout leader training is required...at least up in Canada...by length of service, the longer one stays the more training is required up to a certain point. The Church pays for training (at least it did mine), but way back when I did it, my ward did not push for all leaders to take it. There was a lot of wasted time involved in the training due to the Church doing things differently so I was frustrated and bored and not particularly helped by it, I think there should be special training of LDS leaders instead of throwing them in with the general to save time and money and to address specific problems. That way they could cut the time for the training and get more of the short termers to actually take it.

It has been 15 years since I participated in Scouts so maybe things have changed...but that would be my recommendation.

My other concern...and it was a huge pet peeve...was when I complained about a safety violation (only one leader going out with 14 young men overnight in the winter up in the mountains at Banff in deep snow, not even sure they were alllowed by church rules due to age, it would have been right on the border), I was blown off by the bishop. Thankfully everyone was safe on that trip, it would have been so easy to go wrong then, no cell phone coverage and a very old van the leader (great guy, loved him as a person and a leader save for his lack of regard for the safety rules) took all the young men out in that so easily could have broken down.

I think anyone who has been found to disregard safety rules should be released as a scout leader immediately, feel free to keep in young men's but out of the scout side of it. Perhaps this would get the message across quickly....though it would also create an easy way out for someone who wanted to get released, lol.

I am not totally sure but reasonably so that in our area they have training for LDS scout leaders. Last I heard it was called LDS scout roundtable. Just for LDS scout leaders.

Link to comment

Part of the problem with LDS Scouting is expecting all boys to like it and participate. It takes a remarkable

set of parents and leaders to make it that exciting and rewarding. It is a mistake to call a Scoutmaster who

does not like Scouting or does not care enough to learn about it and follow the program.

Bernard

Link to comment
  • 2 weeks later...

We finally had a parent meeting tonight about Scout behavior, specifically about Scout Camp and wouldn't you know it? The worst kids' parents didn't show up! At least there will be strict rules from now on. Certain behavior will get you sent home immediately. Others will be given one warning and then their parents will be called.

Link to comment

I am grateful that I lived in a time when I did not need to wear a helmet while riding my bike, could stay out at night without fear, left our home unlocked,

I would much rather have a boy be stupid now and then rather than a boy that cannot get off the computer, out of the house, and understand and appreciate what it means to run, be physical, throw a ball and catch it.

Oh, I if I ever do ride a bike again, it will not be with a helmet, knee pads, back brace, gloves, etc. :tribal:

Hello Storm Rider...

My sis and I were talking the other day about the difference between when we grew up, and the way it is now. We just chuckled and wondered how we managed to grow up fairly unscathed... when we roller skated, we had no knee pads, elbow pads, helmets, etc etc... we'd just strap these skates onto our shoes that had adjustable grips that we tightened with a "skate key"... as we'd skate the grips would come loose and the skate would flop around our ankle... but we loved to skate for hours.

We'd take our lunch and ride our bikes all over town with our friends... just us on our bikes... and stop somewhere to eat. Again, we'd be gone for hours... we used our imagination and made up games... running, jumping. When evening came the neighborhood kids would play kick the can until it became too dark and our folks called us in. Whenever I watch "To Kill A Mockingbird" with Jem, Scout, and Dil, it takes me back to my childhood because that was the era I grew up in... small town... neighbors knew each other, looked out for one another... there was an innocence and we were able to be "kids" and not have to grow up so fast...

Yes, yes... I'm thankful for all the "progress" we've made through the years, but from the child's view back then, it was a wonderful time... even during WWII it brought the nation together as we endured the loss of loved ones, rationing, working together... whenever I wax nostalgic like this, someone always points out how much better things are now... and in many ways they are right. But there was something about that era that unless you grew up in it, lived it, you haven't a clue about how much has been "lost" with all of our progress... with our iPads, iPods, Facebook, Twitter, etc etc... all awesome to be sure... but a price has been paid... just read the newspapers... Am I thankful for progress... of course... but my heart tugs also as I think back over the years...

from the beach on a cool, misty morning... GG

Link to comment

Hello Storm Rider...

My sis and I were talking the other day about the difference between when we grew up, and the way it is now. We just chuckled and wondered how we managed to grow up fairly unscathed... when we roller skated, we had no knee pads, elbow pads, helmets, etc etc... we'd just strap these skates onto our shoes that had adjustable grips that we tightened with a "skate key"... as we'd skate the grips would come loose and the skate would flop around our ankle... but we loved to skate for hours.

We'd take our lunch and ride our bikes all over town with our friends... Mjust us on our bikes... and stop somewhere to eat. Again, we'd be gone for hours... we used our imagination and made up games... running, jumping. When evening came the neighborhood kids would play kick the can until it became too dark and our folks called us in. Whenever I watch "To Kill A Mockingbird" with Jem, Scout, and Dil, it takes me back to my childhood because that was the era I grew up in... small town... neighbors knew each other, looked out for one another... there was an innocence and we were able to be "kids" and not have to grow up so fast...

Yes, yes... I'm thankful for all the "progress" we've made through the years, but from the child's view back then, it was a wonderful time... even during WWII it brought the nation together as we endured the loss of loved ones, rationing, working together... whenever I wax nostalgic like this, someone always points out how much better things are now... and in many ways they are right. But there was something about that era that unless you grew up in it, lived it, you haven't a clue about how much has been "lost" with all of our progress... with our iPads, iPods, Facebook, Twitter, etc etc... all awesome to be sure... but a price has been paid... just read the newspapers... Am I thankful for progress... of course... but my heart tugs also as I think back over the years...

from the beach on a cool, misty morning... GG

and no cell phones...parents had to wait to talk to us....nowadays kids can't be "not found"...poor youth.

Edited by Tacenda
Link to comment

I spent my youth in the scouting program, and though there will always be some knuckle-headed, pubescent boys causing trouble, I made it through scouts without any major issues.

Personally, I think that part of the problem arises because LDS boys are not really given a choice about scouting. If you are a deacon, you are a scout too. You don't get to choose to be a scout, but because you are LDS and a deacon, you must now participate in scouting. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule, but in general, it's not really a choice in the LDS church.

It would seem to me that if you had a troop full of boys who had a genuine interest in being involved in scouting, and are not there simply because they have to be as part of their membership in the LDS religion, there would be less of these types of abusive and anti-social behaviors in the troop.

IMO, a boy who has a genuine interest in being part of the Boy Scout experience and gets involved out of interest and desire, rather than obligation, is generally better behaved in the scouting program than those who clearly don't want to be there, but have to be as part of their religious obligation.

That being said, the horseplay that the OP describes doesn't sound too far outside the lines of common practices among today's male youth, especially those in that precarious and confusing age of puberty, though it is certainly outside the lines of acceptable LDS standards and behavior.

Link to comment

To a certain extent, those who have argued against Scouting being compulsory in the Church may have a point. And there are certain parts of the program in which, perhaps, leaders attempt to force "square pegs into round holes." But there are at least a hundred-and-some Merit Badges. I'd be surprised if there weren't enough Merit Badges to capture the interest and spur the motivation of just about everyone. :) Just my two cents.

Link to comment

Any stories to share?

"Mushroom Boy"

We had all gone swimming in a lake and one scout did not have a dry pair of shorts to change. So he sat, wet on his dirty towel, on teh back seat of a leader's car. It was hot and no A/C. The next day, mushrooms sprouted where the scout had been sitting. No complaints from parent about fungal infections, thank goodness.

"Midnight Madness"

We were camping on a beach where there were campers and a community nearby so we had to be quiet. Of course one tentfull of scouts couldn't. After several threats, a leader stormed over to teh tent, ripped the tent flap open, and screamed at the ringleader, "Shut the h*** up! Shut the h*** up!" This boy started pnicking and the leader hollered, "Well, you don't understand normal treatment, that's the only treatment you understand! Now shut the h*** up or I'm taking you back to [hometown]!" The next day, early at breakfast, the leader cheerfully commented on how well-behaved, even subdued the scouts were (especially the one he yelled at). Turns out he couldn't remember a thing from the night before! Being reminded and then remembering later, he called the parent to apologize and the parent thought it was funny. The scouts told this story over and over for years to come.

"Trouble with Cops"

We were driving through the country to a campout in separate vehicles and were communicating between them with walkie-talkies. The other car made jokes about our going to fast and getting pulled over; with some provocation this escalted into their talking like a cop, telling us to pull over. I put teh radio on for static and said in an officious tone, "Picking up two verhicles impersonating police officers speeding on Route [whatever]--intercept at [intersection]." Silence at the other end, but we acted like we didn't "hear" the police and started saying terrible things about cops, breaking the law, etc. They were all nervous when we finally got together again.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...