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Any Aussies In The House (I Have A Question About A Word I Heard)


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I work at a hotel (in the USA.) An Australian couple approached me to inquire about price differences between two styles of rooms.

--------------start conversation-------------

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer* [than the Y rooms]

(*I heard what sounded to be "dearer" in an Australian accent; he could have, very well, been saying something entirely different.)

Me: I'm sorry, what?

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer?

Me: Dearer?

[interjecting] Aussie Woman: Are the X rooms more expensive?

-------------end conversation---------------

Obviously whatever word the man was using meant "more expensive." But for the life of me I can't figure out what he was actually saying. Are there any Aussies here who can shed light on the matter?

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Bottler

Prang

Bluey

Prezzie

Snag

Tall poppy

Cockie cruncher

Banana bender

Cheerio

Oz

Septics

Diggers

Mossies

Minties

Pom

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It's kind of funny, but many-a times I've heard the phrase that something "...cost me dearly ..." In this usage, I have always understood the meaning. Perhaps it's because I've metaphorically interpreted the "dearly" usage simply to mean "It cost me [an arm and a leg]" rather than a countable monetary value. Whereas, when the gentleman asked me if it was "dearer," he literally meant "more expensive." I have just never heard it used in that manner before. But now I know.

Thanks for the answers. :-)

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"Throw a snag on the barbie" Place a sausage on the barbecue

"I'm stuffed" I am full or I am tired

footie - football game

"The olds" my son-in laws reference to his wife's parents.

"cobber" - friend

"mate" friend, usually male

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I work at a hotel (in the USA.) An Australian couple approached me to inquire about price differences between two styles of rooms.

--------------start conversation-------------

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer* [than the Y rooms]

(*I heard what sounded to be "dearer" in an Australian accent; he could have, very well, been saying something entirely different.)

Me: I'm sorry, what?

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer?

Me: Dearer?

[interjecting] Aussie Woman: Are the X rooms more expensive?

-------------end conversation---------------

Obviously whatever word the man was using meant "more expensive." But for the life of me I can't figure out what he was actually saying. Are there any Aussies here who can shed light on the matter?

Here in the South we many words in old English are are made fun of...see you over Younder. Edited by Bill “Papa” Lee
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Bottler...fantastic

Prang...car accident fixed at a prang shop

Bluey..blue eyes and red hair

Prezzie...a present

Snag...sausage

Tall poppy...someone who appears to be self-aggrandizing

Cockie cruncher...flip flops

Banana bender...Queenslander

Cheerio...a small sausage

Oz...Australia

Septics...Americans

Diggers...infantrymen

Mossies...Mosquitos

Minties...yummy mint candies

Pom..Englishman

In Queensland, I you say you are stuffed, it means you are pregnant.

Bickies...cookies

Nappies...diapers

Muso...musician

Lollies...candy

Serviette...table napkin

Sack...to be fired from a job (not something to put things in)

Biro...ball point pen

Tuck shop...cafeteria

Ripper...really great

Jumper...sweater

Wog...a Greek person

Ute...a pickup truck

Loo...toilet

Bonzer...excellent

True blue...real, genuine

Togs...swim suit

Winge...whine or complain

I love Australia and Ozzies.

Bernard

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There has always been a larrikan ethos among Australians. We do not mind people being rich, just do not like them thinking they are better than us (hence the tall poppy syndrome). Our politics on the whole is to the left of America. We have universal health care (public and private options). Our economy at the moment (thanks to the mining boom etc) is the envy of the world. Our Prime Minister often if being driven alone will get in the front seat with his driver. Billionaire Kerry Packer liked to drink with the Labor members of Parliment because he claimed they were not as boring as the conservatives.

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I work at a hotel (in the USA.) An Australian couple approached me to inquire about price differences between two styles of rooms.

--------------start conversation-------------

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer* [than the Y rooms]

(*I heard what sounded to be "dearer" in an Australian accent; he could have, very well, been saying something entirely different.)

Me: I'm sorry, what?

Aussie Man: Are the X rooms dearer?

Me: Dearer?

[interjecting] Aussie Woman: Are the X rooms more expensive?

-------------end conversation---------------

Obviously whatever word the man was using meant "more expensive." But for the life of me I can't figure out what he was actually saying. Are there any Aussies here who can shed light on the matter?

This isn't Aussie -- you'll get the same from Brits. I lived in England for a few years, and the Aussies talk like Brits with some differences -- and insist that they don't talk like Brits at all.

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This isn't Aussie -- you'll get the same from Brits. I lived in England for a few years, and the Aussies talk like Brits with some differences -- and insist that they don't talk like Brits at all.

Being a Brit, I have to say, those Aussies, don't talk like us. We do have may of the same words, but those Bruces and Sheilas have a whole load of their own too.

Dearer, is a Brit word too.

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In Queensland, I you say you are stuffed, it means you are pregnant.

Bernard

Pretty good list! Except for the one above...I'm not sure why, but some of the American missionaries who come to Australia say they have been told at the mission home never to say "I'm stuffed" at the end of a meal at someone's home :)

What it really means is in your previous definition..."I'm stuffed" = "I'm tired" or "I've eaten too much food".

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