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What Else Keeps You Interested?


Buzzard

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We are all here because whether for or against, we are interested in Mormonism. But what else floats yer boat? For me, it's BYU sports, hiking/backpacking/snowshoeing both as exersize and a path to spirituality, and history, at least in choosing the books I read.

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I am interested in food according to the Word of Wisdom. I am continuously trying to figure out all that is good for my body and all that is bad. I search for food knowledge! How does individual foods effect us, what are the benefits to a Mango vs an orange, etc. I want to do right by my body. I want it to live as long as it can. I hope to twinkle from mortality straight into immortality. And eating good food is just SO delicious!

:D

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We are all here because whether for or against, we are interested in Mormonism. But what else floats yer boat? For me, it's BYU sports, hiking/backpacking/snowshoeing both as exersize and a path to spirituality, and history, at least in choosing the books I read.

My boat sunk... :lazy:

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I love music and belong to a bell choir. We do a lot performances at various events and also perform in convalescent homes and a variety of churches. I really enjoy this, as it almost always brings a smile to the faces of people who often really need a reason to smile.

Also, spend a lot of time with family. I have six grandchildren and two more on the way. :)

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I am something of an animal activist. My focus at present is the poaching crisis that is facing South Africa's rhinoceros population. 150 vicioulsy killed for their horns to date this year.

I also enjoy music and wildlife photography.

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I am something of an animal activist. My focus at present is the poaching crisis that is facing South Africa's rhinoceros population. 150 vicioulsy killed for their horns to date this year.

Private ownership of rhinoceroses would solve that problem. Poaching doesn't continue when a man's economic interests are at stake.

Lehi

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Lehi, unfortunately about one third of the rhinos that heve been poached were on private reserves. The horn is worth more than gold or opium on the Asian market as they believe it has medicinal properties. This is not so. Rhino horn is made up of mainly kerstin which is the same as our hair and nails. So if you want to make a quick buck, start a toenail collection, grind them up and sell as rhino horn, :mega_shok:

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Lehi, unfortunately about one third of the rhinos that heve been poached were on private reserves. The horn is worth more than gold or opium on the Asian market as they believe it has medicinal properties. This is not so. Rhino horn is made up of mainly kerstin which is the same as our hair and nails. So if you want to make a quick buck, start a toenail collection, grind them up and sell as rhino horn, :mega_shok:

The preserves may be private, but the rhinos, as I understand it are "wild", unowned. There is no incentive for the preserve owners to protect the animals.

As to making ersatz rhino horn, that may very well be a good idea, as long as there was no cheap, effective means of detecting it. I have one toenail that looks like rhino horn (and, no, it is not onycomycosis—it's part of my patrimony). I'd be glad to contribute to the raw material (for suitable compensation, of course).

Lehi

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" People watching" keeps me interested. I am often curious and interested in understanding and observing human nature (on a non acedimic level) :D I found some interesting things such as some content I posted below that causes my curiousity to grow.

for example here are some interesting post taken from (see below or follow link) http://www.afghanfor...ics-most-common

10 MOST COMMON CHARACTERISTICS:

  1. Most people consider themselves to be right or should i say consider themselves to be the smartest person compared to the next person
  2. We tend to try to show the world our strengths and hide our weaknesses however we tend to fail at doing this
  3. We tend to blame our miseries on the circumstances or others even though it tends to be obvious that we ARE the ones who have made these choices
  4. When we share our problems with others we do not only want to listen to advice, there is a side of us that wants to get the sympathy we might get
  5. When we compare ourselves with others we usually look at ppl who dont have similar problem however we ignore the fact that they have more problems in another part of life.
  6. We tend to exaggerrate our miseries and think only we have problems in our lives where the rest of the world is living in luxury.
  7. We tend to judge others for their miseries and hold them responsible for them however in our situation it is the opposite
  8. When we ask for advise we do not like to hear criticism of our actions or mistakes because we are right in our own way
  9. Alot of people tend to say that they dont like getting attention however they end up doing the weirdest things just to get it.
  10. Most of us when we are in trouble tend to look at the negative aspects of the situation ignoring the positive and this positive outcome could be in the long run but we tend to ignore it.

or below content taken from from http://www.copywriti...-nature-part-2/

"Research has proven time after time that there are more similarities between humans than our minds feel comfortable accepting. Still skeptic? Take a look at the following list and tell me how many of these common human traits apply to you…

Common traits – Most people consider themselves:

  • Good natured
  • Friendly and fun to be around
  • They feel they’re not as satisfied as they could be
  • They feel they’re not as recognized as they should be
  • Considerate to others and with good people skills
  • Adaptable to most situations
  • They never question their own belief systems
  • Have a deep fear of rejection
  • Worry about what others think
  • They all cherish the past, complaint about the present and fear the future
  • They consider themselves good-intentioned, even when behavior is negative
  • They want to make decisions that will make them look good in the eyes of others
  • Almost everyone is afraid of growing old and dying
  • Only those in some sort of pain work to change their status quo
  • They will continue with a bad habit until it pains them
  • They dislike the feeling of being controlled or manipulated
  • They dislike doing things that don’t make sense to them
  • They dislike change without a clear benefit or outcome"

Edited by followerofemmanuel
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The preserves may be private, but the rhinos, as I understand it are "wild", unowned. There is no incentive for the preserve owners to protect the animals.

As to making ersatz rhino horn, that may very well be a good idea, as long as there was no cheap, effective means of detecting it. I have one toenail that looks like rhino horn (and, no, it is not onycomycosis—it's part of my patrimony). I'd be glad to contribute to the raw material (for suitable compensation, of course).

Lehi

The animals in State owned parks belong to the people of South Africa, but those in private reserves are owned by the reserve owners who bought and paid for the animals. Usually auctioned from State parks to control numbers, Some reserve owners are willing to protect their investements with extra security ie. armed guards walking with the rhinos 24/7, Others can't afford it and so are easy targets. There is an initiative to treat the horns with a pesticide which doesn't harm the rhinos, but will cause the person ingesting the horn to become ill.It won't cause any permanent damage. The hope is to be able to treat at least half of the rhinos. That way the risk to the end-user will outweigh the imagined benefits, and the poaching will stop. Sorry, I'll get off my soap-box now. I get quite worked up about it!!

Edited by busybee
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The animals in State owned parks belong to the people of South Africa,

Which means that no one owns them. That which belongs to everyone belongs to no one.

What is common to many is least taken care of, for all men have greater regard for what is their own than for what they possess in common with others.
Therein is the tragedy [of the commons]. Each man is locked into a system that compels him to increase his herd without limit — in a world that is limited.… Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.
those in private reserves are owned by the reserve owners who bought and paid for the animals. Usually auctioned from State parks to control numbers,

It doesn't sound as if the state parks bureaucrats are concerned about numbers if they're selling the herd.

The basic question is, can these private owners sell their animals and products from the animals (like the horns), or are there restrictions on them.

Some reserve owners are willing to protect their investements with extra security ie. armed guards walking with the rhinos 24/7, Others can't afford it and so are easy targets.

If they can sell their property (the rhinos or any part of them), they are foolish in failing to protect their investments. If they cannot, they do not really own them and so have no investment to protect.

By the way, private ownership of the means of production, with governmental control over what is produced, sold, and to whom it may be sold is the definition of fascism. It is the antithesis of the free market. There is no incentive to succeed, and so, no incentive to protect the investment. See Schindler's List.

There is an initiative to treat the horns with a pesticide which doesn't harm the rhinos, but will cause the person ingesting the horn to become ill.It won't cause any permanent damage. The hope is to be able to treat at least half of the rhinos. That way the risk to the end-user will outweigh the imagined benefits, and the poaching will stop.

It will not stop. The poachers are not obligated to tell their customers that the horn is treated. Even if some people get ill, it's only temporary, so the effect will be minimal, at best.

In any case, it is apparent that the state has not protected the rhino, even though huge numbers of armed soldier-rangers are part of the system. What remains to be seen is if, like cows and pigs, the rhino were domesticated to the extent it can be, and truly owned by individuals, it would be endangered. While nearly every individual cow and every individual pig is eventually killed by humans for their products, whether meat or milk, the species of cows and pigs are in no peril of extinction.

You might read this article to learn more about the power of the free market in protecting endangered species.

... three varieties of antelope have been saved from the brink of extinction. The endangered-animal population in Texas is increasing, while it is falling in the animals' native Africa.

...

Well, the numbers are clear even if people such as Priscilla Feral want to ignore them. Texas ranchers are saving these animals even if saving them is not their primary motivation. In short, the government should just leave them alone.

Feral, however, believes it is both immoral and unnatural for these African animals to live in Texas. But an animal reserve in Africa is an artificial habitat as well. How is it immoral for animals to be humanely raised or hunted for the ultimate purpose of human consumption? Hunting on private ranches provides not only utility to the hunter and jobs for about 14,000 people in the local economy; it is saving the animals more effectively than any government regulation ever could.

Unfortunately, Feral was successful in court and a new rule issued by the Fish and Wildlife Service will make it a crime to hunt three types of antelope without a federal permit. This permit will, of course, be a high barrier to entry. Not surprisingly, the new law has already led to a decline in the value of these animals by more than 50 percent according to Seale. Now that the financial incentive to take care of these animals is gone, their numbers will drop again.

While I'm sure Feral has good intentions and cares about these animals, her ignorance of the economics will lead to the disappearance of the very animals she claims to protect. Dr. Condy summed it up well when he responded to Logan's question, "So who is winning the day here?"

"One thing is for sure: they [the animals] are losing."

This is the principle, I believe, that God introduced in the Garden of Eden when He gave Adam "dominion over" the earth, including its animals. Private ownership has protected many species throughout the ages, just as God planned. Communal ownership has never achieved that goal. The reason lies in the quotes from Aristotle and Hardin, above.

Lehi

Edited by LeSellers
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Lehi, unfortunately about one third of the rhinos that heve been poached were on private reserves. The horn is worth more than gold or opium on the Asian market as they believe it has medicinal properties. This is not so. Rhino horn is made up of mainly kerstin which is the same as our hair and nails. So if you want to make a quick buck, start a toenail collection, grind them up and sell as rhino horn, :mega_shok:

I see you subscribe to National Geographic, too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

We are all here because whether for or against, we are interested in Mormonism. But what else floats yer boat? For me, it's BYU sports, hiking/backpacking/snowshoeing both as exersize and a path to spirituality, and history, at least in choosing the books I read.

I like history, too; in fact, I have a masters degree in US history. I don't have a good memory for it, though. I've been reading many books about economics lately, and I garden, hike sometimes (less than I used to do to arthritis and vision issues), and we plan to get 6 baby chicks next week. I hope they will eat ants, if nothing else ;) I teach reading to resource students, and I'm taking graphics arts classes.

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