Jump to content

Mormals


Jeff K.

Recommended Posts

My son had his first Mormal. The theme was a 1920's or 30's type dinner. The kids seemed to really enjoy it. The young men made corsages for the women which was really great, because if something happened and a piece came loose, my son could quickly fix it on the fly. It is certainly a step further than when I was a yonker.

DSCN3437.JPG?gl=US

Link to comment

They have a huge one of these every year at Georgia-Tech for the surrounding Stakes. The kids have a great time and of course no pressure to drink. My children's non-member friends love the event and come along for a wholesome prom type experience.

Nice pics. Cute kids.

Link to comment

Bleh, I went to both of my school proms (my school ran the prom for both Juniors and Seniors). Have things really gotten that bad? Yeah a lot of the guys were showing off their hotel keys, and I do have reason to believe the punch got spiked one time, but it wasn't bad.

Heck, the Church got a momentary boost in popularity when I walked in with my date. Everyone's jaws hit the floor and they wanted to know where I got her.

Link to comment

They are great opportunities to show how people can have fun without drinking, spiking the punch, getting hotel rooms. The after party party was at the bishops house with the requisite "Rock band" and other electronic games in the rooms. When a community cares about its youth, or a section of a community, they can teach the right things while still having fun.

Link to comment

I think they take the opportunity to teach etiquette, in other words how a gentleman is supposed to treat a lady and how a lady is supposed to treat a gentleman. What is good about such training is that both the lady and gentleman know each other's expectations at that point, that there isn't pressure to do one thing or another. It reflects on the nature of interaction between men and women, where both are treated as being both special and with respect towards each other, and no other expectations.

Link to comment

I think they take the opportunity to teach etiquette, in other words how a gentleman is supposed to treat a lady and how a lady is supposed to treat a gentleman. What is good about such training is that both the lady and gentleman know each other's expectations at that point, that there isn't pressure to do one thing or another. It reflects on the nature of interaction between men and women, where both are treated as being both special and with respect towards each other, and no other expectations.

The results would be the good part of doing an ettiquette dinner which I totally agree with. It's the actual dinner in having the most difficult thing to eat and do it in a proper way and then call it 'fun' is the part I'm failing to see.

A 'mormal' sounds like fun but the ettiquette dinner sounds like torture. But I'm curious about what others think.

Link to comment

Wonderful pictures... now that looks like a group of kids that know how to have good natured fun.

I love the idea of "Mormals" and that they have grown in popularity the past few years. And that the non-LDS kids enjoy them just as much...

About "etiquitte" dinners... someone mentioned how could it be fun to try and eat the most difficult thing on the menu? GG experience: When I was in high school, I attended the prom (in those days would be considered a mormal) and it was tradition to go out to dinner beforehand, usually to a nicer restraurant. We went with several other couples to a very nice dinnerhouse. I and another girl ordered the fried chicken dinner. She proceeded to eat her chicken very nicely with a knife and fork. I was embarrassed because I'd only eaten fried chicken by picking it up and wasn't confident using a knife and fork so I didn't eat it but just left it, saying I wasn't as hungry as I had thought. (I know, but I was only 17). Anyway, after that experience I learned how to eat chicken with a knife and fork, and how to eat other dishes properly, and I was never embarrassed again.

GG

Link to comment

The results would be the good part of doing an ettiquette dinner which I totally agree with. It's the actual dinner in having the most difficult thing to eat and do it in a proper way and then call it 'fun' is the part I'm failing to see.

A 'mormal' sounds like fun but the ettiquette dinner sounds like torture. But I'm curious about what others think.

I've seen it done in most wards I've been in. It is just usually a regular several course dinner as far as to eat, it's the good manners that is on display...pulling seats out, etc. They don't try to set things up to be difficult. The kids do have a fun time with it.

Link to comment

Wonderful pictures... now that looks like a group of kids that know how to have good natured fun.

I love the idea of "Mormals" and that they have grown in popularity the past few years. And that the non-LDS kids enjoy them just as much...

About "etiquitte" dinners... someone mentioned how could it be fun to try and eat the most difficult thing on the menu? GG experience: When I was in high school, I attended the prom (in those days would be considered a mormal) and it was tradition to go out to dinner beforehand, usually to a nicer restraurant. We went with several other couples to a very nice dinnerhouse. I and another girl ordered the fried chicken dinner. She proceeded to eat her chicken very nicely with a knife and fork. I was embarrassed because I'd only eaten fried chicken by picking it up and wasn't confident using a knife and fork so I didn't eat it but just left it, saying I wasn't as hungry as I had thought. (I know, but I was only 17). Anyway, after that experience I learned how to eat chicken with a knife and fork, and how to eat other dishes properly, and I was never embarrassed again.

GG

I'm about to mark myself as a Neanderthal ;), but if it's got a bone in it, I'm picking it up! :D:rofl: (Gross-motor and fine-motor control challenges related to disability make the alternative more difficult than it would otherwise be ... :))

Link to comment

Our region does a "Mormon Prom" every year, and they go all out. Each year is at a different notable venue, from the Will Rogers Western Museum to the Long Beach Aquarium. This year it's at the California Science Center. The kids are bussed in (mandatory), so no one drives. I've only heard really good things about it.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...