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Magic Underwear... When Will People Get A Clue?


LDSGuy

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Just heard about this on the news, and found it on the web:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/24/new-york-times-charles-blow-mktt-romney-magic-underwear_n_1299624.html

Charles Blow a columnist for the New York Times made a derogatory statement about LDS temple garments in a response to Mitt Romney's answer to a question. "tick that in your magic underwear," was at the end of the tweet. He then issued an apology a couple of days later.

Is he regretting his statement being offensive, endangering his position at NYT, or for misrepresenting the LDS temple garment? He doesn't say. I think an apology should be specific. However, it does represent how people see the garment.

Why are Latter-Day Saints singled out for wearing religious clothing? Other religious groups wear religious garments such as Catholic priests and nuns, Jews, Christian clergy, Buddhists, etc. Many faiths recognize the need for religious clothing as a reminder of one's commitments and covenants.

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Actually- no apology was offered.

"Btw, the comment I made about Mormonism during Wed.'s debate was inappropriate, and I regret it. I'm willing to admit that with no caveats,"

No acknowledgement that the comment might have offended.

No regret for the deliberate disrespect offered to people of faith.

No acknowledgement that the comment was hurtful, offensive, or inflammatory.

Just "the comment was not appropriate".

No apology was offered.

But fear not, gentle readers- Blow's politics will protect him from serious reprisal.

By contrast, does anyone remember the media flap when a Republican senator called out "You lie!" during the State of the Union?

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction to the two incidents, is it not?

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Just heard about this on the news, and found it on the web:

http://www.huffingto..._n_1299624.html

Charles Blow a columnist for the New York Times made a derogatory statement about LDS temple garments in a response to Mitt Romney's answer to a question. "tick that in your magic underwear," was at the end of the tweet. He then issued an apology a couple of days later.

Is he regretting his statement being offensive, endangering his position at NYT, or for misrepresenting the LDS temple garment? He doesn't say. I think an apology should be specific. However, it does represent how people see the garment.

Why are Latter-Day Saints singled out for wearing religious clothing? Other religious groups wear religious garments such as Catholic priests and nuns, Jews, Christian clergy, Buddhists, etc. Many faiths recognize the need for religious clothing as a reminder of one's commitments and covenants.

St. Simon Stock is reported to have it from the Blessed Virgin Mary that no one who dies with the Brown Scapular of Mt. Carmel will go to hell. Of course, we Catholics understand that the Brown Scapular, which I wear, is not a magical talisman, but rather a reminder given to us by God of our obligations, and those faithfully wearing it will subsequently be sanctified so as to reach heaven. You can't get killed while committing murder and go to heaven because of the Scapular. Instead it means that if you wear the Scapular, you'll have the grace to not be murdering. But if LDS undergarments are deserving of ridicule as magical, so are mine.

3DOP

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Why are Latter-Day Saints singled out for wearing religious clothing? Other religious groups wear religious garments such as Catholic priests and nuns, Jews, Christian clergy, Buddhists, etc. Many faiths recognize the need for religious clothing as a reminder of one's commitments and covenants.

The difference, of course, is that the LDS wear their religious clothing under their street clothes, closed off from the view of others (unless you know what to look for). For some reason, when religious clothing is worn on the outside for everybody to see, people don't have as big of an issue with it. But when it's underwear, some people are weirded out and have a cow.

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St. Simon Stock is reported to have it from the Blessed Virgin Mary that no one who dies with the Brown Scapular of Mt. Carmel will go to hell. Of course, we Catholics understand that the Brown Scapular, which I wear, is not a magical talisman, but rather a reminder given to us by God of our obligations, and those faithfully wearing it will subsequently be sanctified so as to reach heaven. You can't get killed while committing murder and go to heaven because of the Scapular. Instead it means that if you wear the Scapular, you'll have the grace to not be murdering. But if LDS undergarments are deserving of ridicule as magical, so are mine.

3DOP

Interesting!

I had not heard of this scapular thing before, and I take it that the item is worn underneath the outer layer of clothing?

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The difference, of course, is that the LDS wear their religious clothing under their street clothes, closed off from the view of others (unless you know what to look for). For some reason, when religious clothing is worn on the outside for everybody to see, people don't have as big of an issue with it. But when it's underwear, some people are weirded out and have a cow.

Agreed...... For reference see phylacteries and related parables....

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It is interesting that a lot of promoters of nonreligiosity often state the importance of understanding cultural relativism and how those of a religious persuasion need comprehend that things are relevant or have meaning only in the sense of how that culture values and appraises it, leaving little room for any universality. However, with contemporary 21st century understanding in knowing the silliness that is associated with underwear in general, we can be assured this 'silliness' is not brought about by an arbitrary cultural distinction, but rather by a surely universal acceptance of underwear being synonymous with snickers and giggles.

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Interesting!

I had not heard of this scapular thing before, and I take it that the item is worn underneath the outer layer of clothing?

The scapular must be 100% wool without plastic casing and should not be pinned or affixed to clothing. It is worn over the head, under one’s clothes, with one square of wool hanging on the chest and the other on the back. Pictures are not necessary.

Just as priests and religious wear clerical garments, which are called the "habit" because of its propensity to make the wearer habitually conscious of consecration to God, so people who live in the world are encouraged to wear the scapular (from the Latin scapulis, meaning shoulder) under their garments for a similar reason. But it would be inappropriate, not to mention impractical, for people in the world to wear a full habit and so a Scapular is ordinarily used. Most religious orders are divided into first order/priests, second order/brothers and religious sisters, and third order/men and women living in the world. When I was discerning whether I should become a third order Dominican, I wore the scapular of the Dominicans. It was all white, just like the full Dominican habit worn by the first two orders.

Pope Pius XII had this to say regarding those who enjoy the privileges attached to wearing the Brown Scapular:

“All Carmelites, whether they live in the cloisters of the First or Second Orders or are members of the Third Order or of the Confraternities, belong to the same family of our Most Blessed Mother and are attached to it by a special bond of love. May they all see in this keepsake of the Virgin herself a mirror of humility and purity; may they read in the very simplicity of the Garment a concise lesson in modesty and simplicity; above all, may they behold in this same Garment, which they wear day and night, the eloquent expressive symbol of their prayers for divine assistance.”

So anyway, given that there are like a billion Catholics in the world, I'll bet millions of us wear "magical underwear" to use the language of this person who if he knew of our practices, disdains my faith as much as yours. We used to have a pastor who would close many sermons with the admonition to keep praying our Rosaries and wearing our Scapulars. Verrrry magical, huh?

The quotes are taken from this website where more information is available: http://www.sistersofcarmel.com/brown-scapular-information.php

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I dunno about you, I always feel like Clark Kent most of the time anyways. B:) But, on a more serious note, and carefully worded, we do indeed commit to do right. Our actions, which are sometimes driven by circumstances and called upon by the spirit, are common acts that some may see as heroic. But like so many average, everyday heroes without costumes we do the acts that help others in a selfless way to improve someone else's life with no desire for fame of any kind. And our acts are are not always specifically outlined ahead of time, such as in the temple, but more generally. And although we do go on missions to teach those that don't know our truth, and we as home teachers try to bring others back into the fold, and as priesthood bearers, fathers, and mothers, we bless, pray for, and even at times call down the powers of heaven to change an outcome because that change must be. And although it may be that we visit, teach, or contact, the world may indeed threaten us, even take our lives. It would only seem natural to me that God would protect those that are doing his will. But, I don't think its magic.

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You know, to be perfectly honest with you, the fact that people like this actually want to spend time talking about someone else's underwear really speaks for itself.

I don't believe that's quite fair.

There's no basis (that I've seen) to suspect that Blow spends an excessive amount of time thinking about other people's underwear.

Based on the available evidence, his comment was a cheap-shot designed to rile up the prejudices of the red-meat base among his Twitter audience.

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I don't believe that's quite fair.

There's no basis (that I've seen) to suspect that Blow spends an excessive amount of time thinking about other people's underwear.

Based on the available evidence, his comment was a cheap-shot designed to rile up the prejudices of the red-meat base among his Twitter audience.

I was mostly joking, but I wasn't talking about him in particular. I'm talking about those who talk about our sacred undergarments in general, and especially those who talk about it with members of the Church.

"Are you really asking me about what kind of underwear I'm wearing right now? Really? That's weird."

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"Are you really asking me about what kind of underwear I'm wearing right now? Really? That's weird."

B.J. Clinton answered the question Until then, one would have been tempted to call the police: "Officer, this pervert keeps talking about my underwear."

Nowadays, it's like asking about your health—just a social convention: boxers or briefs? lo-rise or thong? And we wonder how we got to the point of same-sex "marriage".

Lehi

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We used to have a pastor who would close many sermons with the admonition to keep praying our Rosaries and wearing our Scapulars. Verrrry magical, huh?

I remember when I was getting ready to go to the World Youth Day event last year in Spain and there was a video in how to pack for the event so that you can keep everything within a large backpack for the one week event. One thing that he stressed to be spiritually prepared was to ensure we wore our shield (the scapular) as well as to have our sword (the rosary) during our travels. While it's not necessarily popular to wear a scapular in the US, I suspect that it's more common in other countries and only a million Catholics wearing them would be a low number.

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I find it disrespectful when critics of the church stoop to the level of calling the garment "magic underwear." You would think that someone who is supposedly knowledgeable about "Mormons" would be able to use the same terminology that practicing Latter-Day Saints use.

Of course, they're not trying to represent us in a respectful light or tone. They are going for the shock and awe effect.

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