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Coming Out Of The Closet…I Love The Cross!


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Yes despite accounts to the contrary, I love the cross. I grew up as a Baptist and it was a focal point; although our Church was poor and did not have one. One of my favorite songs growing up was “The Old Rugged Cross”. When I was young and could sing my mother requested that I sing it at her funeral…I may still do it. I am afraid if I do my mother and I will be the only ones left in the building.

Once I was riding to the Temple with some friends and a member (former Catholic) who asked how I felt about the cross, so I told her. She began to cry and say that she loved it too.

How do you feel about the cross?

I am not advocating we put it on our chapels, but would not be offended if we did. I think David O McKay’s comments have caused misunderstandings.

It would be great if this song were added to our hymnals.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1465794/amazing_grace_judy_collins_and_the_choir/

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I feel the same way Papa. I recently listened to a sermon where the minister explained exactly how I feel. I was so appreciative for his articulation of what this symbol means to me.

The cross doesn't represent Christ's death to me.

It represents His suffering.

It reminds me when my heart is broken, when I feel betrayed, when I've been beaten down, when it seems as though my enemies have overcome me, that there is One who understands. There is One who has descended below all things and has carried a weight that far exceeds my own. There is One who, no matter what I experience, understands, empathizes, and can offer succor.

The cross reminds me that no matter what I go through, whatever small cross I am called to bear, I do not walk alone.

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My mother, a convert of over 50 years, loved the same hymn. In fact, just as your mother, when she died two of the hymns we sang at the funeral were, "The Old Rugged Cross", and "I come to the Garden Alone". I love those hymns also.

When my father died, a non-member, one of the songs he chose was, "Precious Memories", which is a fantastic hymn that has some very surprising LDS teachings:

Precious Memories

Precious memories, unseen angels

Sent from somewhere to my soul

How they linger, ever near me

And the sacred scenes unfold.

Precious memories, how they linger

How they ever flood my soul

In the stillness of the midnight

Precious, sacred scenes unfold.

Precious father, loving mother

Fly across the lonely years

And old home scenes of my childhood

In fond memory appear.

In the stillness of the midnight

Echoes from the past I hear

Old-time singing, gladness bringing

From that lovely land somewhere.

I remember mother praying

Father, too, on bended knee

Sun is sinking, shadows falling

But their prayers still follow me.

As I travel on life's pathway

Know not what the years may hold

As I ponder, hope grows fonder

Precious memories flood my soul.

This one has really given me some wonderful moments as I hear it play. The melody is wonderful.

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Precious Memories

Precious memories, unseen angels

Sent from somewhere to my soul

How they linger, ever near me

And the sacred scenes unfold.

Precious memories, how they linger

How they ever flood my soul

In the stillness of the midnight

Precious, sacred scenes unfold.

Precious father, loving mother

Fly across the lonely years

And old home scenes of my childhood

In fond memory appear.

In the stillness of the midnight

Echoes from the past I hear

Old-time singing, gladness bringing

From that lovely land somewhere.

I remember mother praying

Father, too, on bended knee

Sun is sinking, shadows falling

But their prayers still follow me.

As I travel on life's pathway

Know not what the years may hold

As I ponder, hope grows fonder

Precious memories flood my soul.

My favorite hymn of all time...thank you for reminding me.

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Having been raised in the Church, there has always been an aversion to the cross. I'm afraid it would take some getting used to for me to include that as part of my life, though I do not feel as 'aghast' as I used to when I see members wear jewelry and such with a cross to church. If the Brethren "lifted the ban" I suppose I would be fine with it. MW

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Having been raised in the Church, there has always been an aversion to the cross. I'm afraid it would take some getting used to for me to include that as part of my life, though I do not feel as 'aghast' as I used to when I see members wear jewelry and such with a cross to church. If the Brethren "lifted the ban" I suppose I would be fine with it. MW

The Brethren have never initiated a "ban" in the first place. I am not aware of a policy which states that members of the Church should not wear crosses.

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I have no problem with the cross. I too grew up a born again Christian. I think sometimes we let too many things separate us from others where we need to reach out more. A good way to do this is recognizing things we have in common. Again, this is my perspective from a convert. Then again, I have a tattoo, so what do I know? 8P

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For decades most LDS did not like most outward signs of religion. This has become more lax with the prevalence of CTR rings, Moroni lapel pins and such. As these things grew in popularity. all outward signs have become more acceptable within the LDS culture. It is not surprising that wearing a cross also grows in acceptance along with these other items.

I suspect many older LDS still have a degree of discomfort with these symbols; I personally don't wear any of them and I don't see that changing. However, in my home you will find many things that many LDS would not have: a crucifix; a cross; Arab worry beads (misbahah), St. Rita statue (a gift), a brass/bronze pot with the 99 names of Allah, and a few more. However, I just don't like to wear symbols of religion on my person. I believe that our actions should identify as disciples of Christ; and if our actions don't, then no symbol can overcome the glaring example I set.

Edited by Storm Rider
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I have no problem with the cross. I too grew up a born again Christian. I think sometimes we let too many things separate us from others where we need to reach out more. A good way to do this is recognizing things we have in common. Again, this is my perspective from a convert. Then again, I have a tattoo, so what do I know? 8P

In my mixed faith marriage, my LDS wife never felt comfortable with the thought of having a crucifix in the house :sorry: but I respected the Moroni's and Temple pictures. She was fine with any other type of cross as long as it wasn't a crucifix.

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I grew up LDS, believe crosses can be beautiful reminders of one's faith though they don't really serve that function for me. I am not sure how I would react to a crucifix, it would definitely be a reminder which would be more effective in bringing Christ and his gifts to us to mind but depending on the version I might find it distasteful in that it appeared to me as almost glorying in the nastiness of his suffering. I can understand the principle behind it, but emotionally don't find that sort of reminder effective, more distracting from the message.

I have often thought that crossing oneself could be a very comforting exercise, that it can act like going down on one's knees to pray or crossing one's arms to create a moment of sacred space for the individual in the middle of mundane things. Same thing for the rosary, while if my understanding is correct where one repeats a set prayer and counts them off by the rosary...again I see it as a positive meditative action that contributes to the individual being able to concentrate on spiritual things. The problem arises, in my opinion, when they become done without thought to the point that it does not actually lead to its goal, but then I would assume that this is seen as an problem by the RCC, that such actions are meant to be done with consciously and not reduced to the same status of saying the alphabet, humming a familiar lullaby to help one relax, 'counting sheep' or staring at a candle to empty one's mind (none of which are bad, the autopilot mindset that such things allow or even encourage is not something that should be used during sacred moments in my opinion).

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In my mixed faith marriage, my LDS wife never felt comfortable with the thought of having a crucifix in the house :sorry: but I respected the Moroni's and Temple pictures. She was fine with any other type of cross as long as it wasn't a crucifix.

No offense...the cross is great a crucifix is gruesome to me. But as a Catholic it is what you grew up with so I understand.

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No offense...the cross is great a crucifix is gruesome to me. But as a Catholic it is what you grew up with so I understand.

For LDS IMO, you seem to put more emphasis with the Agony in the Garden where Catholics may appear to put more emphasis on the Crucifixion. In reality, it's more about the Passion of Christ that started in the Garden and ended on Easter Sunday with the Resurrection. I believe if you study the Catholic practice of the Stations of the Cross, you would better understand the viewpoint.

We all have our daily crosses in life to deal with. Seeing Christ on the Cross keeps the perspective of how my daily crosses fail in comparison to what Jesus did for us so that we can be an 'Easter People' in celebrating our Christianity.

Don't worry Papa. You're in good company of LDS folks that don't understand our love for the crucifix and how it makes it personal for us. At least we celebrate His Resurrection longer than we contemplate His death since the Lenten season is only 40 days versus the 50 days we celebrate Easter. :air_kiss:

...added......My wife never understood my desire to watch Mel Gibson's "The Passion of Christ" yearly either... :nea:

Edited by blueadept
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I have often thought that crossing oneself could be a very comforting exercise, that it can act like going down on one's knees to pray or crossing one's arms to create a moment of sacred space for the individual in the middle of mundane things.

I can appreciate the outsider's viewpoint that it looks like Catholics are swatting flies when they are crossing themselves.... 8P

In reality, it's the simplest form of prayer since we are saying "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. AMEN" each and every time which is a complete prayer in itself that's also used to begin and end other prayers. A prayer that uses action AND words.

Same thing for the rosary, while if my understanding is correct where one repeats a set prayer and counts them off by the rosary...again I see it as a positive meditative action that contributes to the individual being able to concentrate on spiritual things. The problem arises, in my opinion, when they become done without thought to the point that it does not actually lead to its goal, but then I would assume that this is seen as an problem by the RCC, that such actions are meant to be done with consciously and not reduced to the same status of saying the alphabet, humming a familiar lullaby to help one relax, 'counting sheep' or staring at a candle to empty one's mind (none of which are bad, the autopilot mindset that such things allow or even encourage is not something that should be used during sacred moments in my opinion).

When I introduce the rosary to the RCIA (those that will be joining the RCC on Easter) class, I always stress that we are focussing on an aspect of Jesus' life from the bible and that there is a virtue associated with each decade that we are meditating on. I always introduce the scripture rosary for the Joyful Mysteries (Jesus' childhood), Luminous Mysteries (Jesus' ministry), Sorrowful Mysteries ( Jesus' Passion) and the Glorious Mysteries (Jesus from the Resurrection on).

If the person saying a rosary isn't meditating on the life of Jesus on some level, there's a problem.

With my understanding of the rosary, I have no problem in using it as a way of 'counting sheep'... :air_kiss:

Edited by blueadept
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It was there where his greatest suffering occurred. It was there he had to be strengthened by the angel Gabriell. (Hope I spelled that right)

I'd like to see where the angel has a name.

I, personally, believe the"angel from the Lord" was the Father Himself: Who better to comfort the Son Who was about to shoulder my sins in my stead, and all those of mankind? He, Jesus, was praying to the Father, asking for the strength to complete His mission on my behalf. I don't see Father shifting this request down His bureaucracy to Gabriel or Raphael, or any one else: it was His Son's "final request", and I believe Father would have done this for the Son He loved/s so much.

Lehi

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With my understanding of the rosary, I have no problem in using it as a way of 'counting sheep'... :air_kiss:

I love the idea of making the beads out of rose or other flower petals so that not only is the rosary a mental and tactile exercise, the aroma that the heat of the fingers releases acts as an incense in purging impure thoughts, etc. Or having it made out of a material that has spiritual significance to the individual (symbolic or experiential).

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I love the idea of making the beads out of rose or other flower petals so that not only is the rosary a mental and tactile exercise, the aroma that the heat of the fingers releases acts as an incense in purging impure thoughts, etc. Or having it made out of a material that has spiritual significance to the individual (symbolic or experiential).

I almost bought one of those last year but didn't in fear of ruining it. With my constant use of rosary and taking them in and out of my pocket, I'm rough on rosaries. So I got practical and got a rosary ring that I wear in place of my wedding ring that I don't care to wear for some reason. Problem solved :)

Edited by blueadept
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... Then again, I have a tattoo, so what do I know? 8P

Heathen! ;):D

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<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt"><font color="#000000" face="Calibri" size="3">I have always felt ambivalent about both crosses and crucifixes. I don’t personally use them and don’t fully understand the meaning some attach to it. The bottom line is that it is a symbol. Symbols have different meanings to different people. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes"> </span>We as LDS should understand that better than anyone. </font></p>

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Having been raised in the Church, there has always been an aversion to the cross. I'm afraid it would take some getting used to for me to include that as part of my life, though I do not feel as 'aghast' as I used to when I see members wear jewelry and such with a cross to church. If the Brethren "lifted the ban" I suppose I would be fine with it. MW

There is a ban?

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I can understand why the cross is meaningful to people. What I don't understand is why some women like to wear diamond studded crosses around their necks as they show off their cleavage. Ugh.

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