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Coach Joe Paterno Dead At 85


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Link: http://abcnews.go.com/US/joe-paterno-legendary-penn-state-football-coach-dead/story?id=15377759#.Txwxem-udRY

This may sound mean, but I wont lose any sleep over his death. Sports figures and programs, and our elevation of them, often have caused us to long overlook personal freedom of others. If Joe is only remembered for his football career - he may be remembered. If he is only remembered for is character - sadly he will probably be forgotten because he too overlooked his responsibility of right and wrong when wrong was played out in front of him and he said nothing. Winning above all else is not winning. Sadly, his bad example is probably the best thing he could hope for in terms of real change for the better.

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Now confirmed, his family's released a statement: http://abcnews.go.com/US/moving-statement-joe-paternos-family/story?id=15415339#.TxxgVYF6iko

It is with great sadness that we announce that Joe Paterno passed away earlier today. His loss leaves a void in our lives that will never be filled.

He died as he lived. He fought hard until the end, stayed positive, thought only of others and constantly reminded everyone of how blessed his life had been. His ambitions were far reaching, but he never believed he had to leave this Happy Valley to achieve them. He was a man devoted to his family, his university, his players and his community.

He has been many things in his life - a soldier, scholar, mentor, coach, friend and father. To my mother he was and is her soul mate, and the last several weeks have shown the strength of their love. To his children and grandchildren he is a shining example of how to live a good, decent and honest life, a standard to which we aspire.

When he decided to forego a career in law and make coaching his vocation, his father Angelo had but one command: make an impact.

As the last 61 years have shown, Joe made an incredible impact. That impact has been felt and appreciated by our family in the form of thousands of letters and well wishes along with countless acts of kindness from people whose lives he touched. It is evident also in the thousands of successful student athletes who have gone on to multiply that impact as they spread out across the country.

And so he leaves us with a peaceful mind, comforted by his "living legacy" of five kids, 17 grandchildren, and hundreds of young men whose lives he changed in more ways than can begin to be counted.

In lieu of flowers or gifts, the family requests that donations be made to the Special Olympics of Pennsylvania or the Penn State-THON (The Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon).

And I am bummed out. My dad worked at Penn State when I was a kid, and I met the man. He was a good man, despite what others have said impugning his character, and I'll miss him.

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The madding crowd is fickle and will turn to praise or decry in a moment. I am happy that the crowd does not judge in the final analysis.We all sin and fall short of the glory of God. If one sin can totally destroy a lifetime of good then why bother to strive? At least,that is what Satan tells us.

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Living in PA, my observation is that as usual, the media has not reported the whole story. I'm not a big fan of sports in general, and not a Penn State fan, but what was very evident is that the Penn State board of trustees needed scapegoats, and Paterno had ruffled enough feathers that he became one of them. Penn State badly bungled everything associated with the Sandusky situation; while Paterno may have borne some blame at some level (and he did not keep quiet; he was accused of not doing enough), the administration at Penn State bears a large amount of blame and has lost significant credibility. However, that's in keeping with the inane actions of other administrations at higher institutions of "learning" this past year. Paterno's influence will leave a void that will be readily filled by the political enemies he made as he became too powerful in the eyes of some.

I'll note that Paterno and Lavell Edwards had very good relationships while coaching; both attempted to hold their programs to high standards, and those in the great and spacious building always stand ready to denigrate when any mistake is made.

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Living in PA, my observation is that as usual, the media has not reported the whole story. I'm not a big fan of sports in general, and not a Penn State fan, but what was very evident is that the Penn State board of trustees needed scapegoats, and Paterno had ruffled enough feathers that he became one of them. Penn State badly bungled everything associated with the Sandusky situation; while Paterno may have borne some blame at some level (and he did not keep quiet; he was accused of not doing enough), the administration at Penn State bears a large amount of blame and has lost significant credibility. However, that's in keeping with the inane actions of other administrations at higher institutions of "learning" this past year. Paterno's influence will leave a void that will be readily filled by the political enemies he made as he became too powerful in the eyes of some.

I'll note that Paterno and Lavell Edwards had very good relationships while coaching; both attempted to hold their programs to high standards, and those in the great and spacious building always stand ready to denigrate when any mistake is made.

There is blame enough to go around and surely Joe Paterno must bear his share of the blame in the Sandusky affair. We all have our shoulda, coulda, woulda moments. Mr Paterno did a lot of good and will be missed, his one error will haunt some. In the end all one can say is that over all he was a good man.

Edited by ERayR
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Now confirmed, his family's released a statement: http://abcnews.go.co...39#.TxxgVYF6iko

And I am bummed out. My dad worked at Penn State when I was a kid, and I met the man. He was a good man, despite what others have said impugning his character, and I'll miss him.

If he knew that a man was molesting children and didn't work to stop it, then he wasn't a good man. If there hasn't been proof of that (and i admit that i don't know if it has been proven or not), then there is definitely room to believe the best of him.

Either way i am sorry for his family.

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He built an excellent football program where a commitment to excellence and choosing well was taught. It is very difficult to judge the man when so few of us actually know what happened. What is clear is that he had an asst. coach that chose very badly and harmed the entire program. I feel sad that such a great man had his career ended prematurely and without all the facts being brought forth.

Edited by Storm Rider
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Here are a few related quotes:

Link: http://lds.org/general-conference/2010/10/pride-and-the-priesthood?lang=eng

"When I was called as a General Authority, I was blessed to be tutored by many of the senior Brethren in the Church. One day I had the opportunity to drive President James E. Faust to a stake conference. During the hours we spent in the car, President Faust took the time to teach me some important principles about my assignment. He explained also how gracious the members of the Church are, especially to General Authorities. He said, “They will treat you very kindly. They will say nice things about you.” He laughed a little and then said, “Dieter, be thankful for this. But don’t you ever inhale it.” "

"The Apostle Peter warned that “God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.” Mormon explained, “None is acceptable before God, save the meek and lowly in heart.” And by design, the Lord chooses “the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty.” The Lord does this to show that His hand is in His work, lest we “trust in the arm of flesh.” We are servants of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. We are not given the priesthood so that we can take our bows and bask in praise. We are here to roll up our sleeves and go to work. We are enlisted in no ordinary task. We are called to prepare the world for the coming of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. We seek not our own honor but give praise and glory to God. We know that the contribution we can make by ourselves is small; nevertheless, as we exercise the power of the priesthood in righteousness, God can cause a great and marvelous work to come forth through our efforts. We must learn, as Moses did, that “man is nothing” by himself but that “with God all things are possible.”

"Pride is a deadly cancer. It is a gateway sin that leads to a host of other human weaknesses. In fact, it could be said that every other sin is, in essence, a manifestation of pride. This sin has many faces. It leads some to revel in their own perceived self-worth, accomplishments, talents, wealth, or position. They count these blessings as evidence of being “chosen,” “superior,” or “more righteous” than others. This is the sin of “Thank God I am more special than you.” At its core is the desire to be admired or envied. It is the sin of self-glorification."

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I have always been grateful to George A. Smith and for his personal creed:

  • I would be a friend to the friendless and find joy in ministering to the needs of the poor.
  • I would visit the sick and afflicted and inspire in them a desire for faith to be healed.
  • I would teach the truth to the understanding and blessing of mankind.
  • I would seek out the erring one and try to win him back to a righteous and happy life.
  • I would not seek to force people to live up to my ideals, but rather love them into doing the thing that is right.
  • I would live with the masses and help to solve their problems that their earth life may be happy.
  • I would avoid the publicity of high position and discourage the flattery of thoughtless friends.
  • I would not knowingly wound the feelings of any, not even one who may have wronged me, but would seek to do good and make him my friend.
  • I would overcome the tendency to selfishness and jealousy and rejoice in the success of all the children of our Heavenly Father.
  • I would not be an enemy to any living soul.
  • Knowing that the Redeemer of mankind has offered to the world the only plan that will fully develop us and make us really happy here and hereafter, I feel it not only a duty but a blessed privilege to disseminate this truth.

I particularly enjoy, "I would avoid the publicity of high position and discourage the flattery of thoughtless friends. How often we use flattery and how unnecessary and hurtful to those who seek to follow Christ. We do not need to tempt them or inflate their pride. There is a way to be kind without any appeal to flattery. This is the creed that I strive to set as my ideal. I hope others may find it as helpful as I have to understanding the gospel of Jesus Christ.

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Here are a few related quotes:

Link: http://lds.org/gener...sthood?lang=eng

"When I was called as a General Authority, I was blessed to be tutored by many of the senior Brethren in the Church. One day I had the opportunity to drive President James E. Faust to a stake conference. During the hours we spent in the car, President Faust took the time to teach me some important principles about my assignment. He explained also how gracious the members of the Church are, especially to General Authorities. He said, “They will treat you very kindly. They will say nice things about you.” He laughed a little and then said, “Dieter, be thankful for this. But don’t you ever inhale it.” "

I was called to servie in the District Relief Society Presidency... We had a wonderful District President who told us this:

"The members are very good to us!! Sometimes too good to us!! They welcome us, they feed us at theor potlucks, they flatter us... But, remember this-

It is not YOU they crave... It is the SPIRIT they crave!! And, if you are doing your job correctly, you bring the Spirit with you!!"

I have never forgotten that comment and it changed the way I ministered in that calling!!

Silver Girl

:clapping:

Edited by Silver Girl
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Apparently denial runs in the family?

Let's remember that he did not die when the media announced he had: there were 14 additional hours before he finally passed away.

The family was telling the truth, as far as I can tell. It was not the family that distorted reality.

Lehi

Edited by LeSellers
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I wonder how many people actually knew him. Fame is funny at times. In the ATV performance world, there were times when people said they knew me, but they didn't. Fame can be blind. As far as Mister Paterno, I have no idea who he was and for me, its not any different than the other $154,000 that die everyday that are not famous in sports.

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