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Happy New Year Thoughts


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Happy New Year Friends & Friends that are Family! This morning I had some time before church and wanted to share something … some kind of message about the New Year. First of all, it’s not the car you drive, the house you live in or the things you have. It’s not about the trendy job you have, the fancy neighborhood you live in, or having the latest and greatest, and nothing but the best, of everything! It’s about what you do with your talents, skills and education. 1) Do you provide for yourself and your family? 2) Do you have compassion for those that are down on their luck? 3) Do you help someone with something in someway? My promise to you is that if you do more of the three listed items above, this year will be better than last year! Also, one more thing I have found that made my 2010 a great year – I’ve learned to forgive better, and more deeply, than I have ever done before. May life grant you true happiness, no matter where you go or how you live.

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Happy New Year Friends & Friends that are Family! This morning I had some time before church and wanted to share something … some kind of message about the New Year. First of all, it’s not the car you drive, the house you live in or the things you have. It’s not about the trendy job you have, the fancy neighborhood you live in, or having the latest and greatest, and nothing but the best, of everything! It’s about what you do with your talents, skills and education. 1) Do you provide for yourself and your family? 2) Do you have compassion for those that are down on their luck? 3) Do you help someone with something in someway? My promise to you is that if you do more of the three listed items above, this year will be better than last year! Also, one more thing I have found that made my 2010 a great year – I’ve learned to forgive better, and more deeply, than I have ever done before. May life grant you true happiness, no matter where you go or how you live.

Happy New year!

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