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I Was Recently Asked...


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I was recently (actually it was more than a month ago) asked by a close friend as to whether or not, if given the chance, I would ask God to change my sexual orientation. Automatically, my weakness had shown through in my mind. I almost abruptly answered in the affirmative.

But I was stopped. I can only describe the experience as humbling.

I chose not to continue the discussion any further.

Later, after the usual (scripture reading, meditation, prayer, etc.), I began to reflect more closely on the sacred journey that I am on. Upon deep reflection, I would answer 'no' if I were to be asked the again. Initially, I was angry with myself and somewhat embarassed for not expressing gratitude to Heavenly Father first.

More recently, I have decided that I am not so much concerned with the next life (my eyes are not set on the Celestial Kingdom). I am more concerned with how I choose to embrace the blessings of trial, of suffering, of pain, of joy, of peace, etc. in this mortal existence. I believe that this life, the ultimate blessing for me, will be the means by which I experience the fullness of the Father.

I'm not 'advocating sin' as some of my critics may perceive. I also know that my comments would be considered contrary to normative theological teachings. I'm okay with that.

This sacred experience that is life, for me, transcends the glory of the eternities. I mean no disrespect to the sanctity of that glory.

__________________________

My question to the board members is this:

Do the positive and negative experiences in this life determine weak 'what-ifs' greatly in your individual experience?

If so, what are the developing or consistent theological ideas that form or remain?

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Val, thank you for your post. Lord in Heaven this is a complicated topic you bring up. The ultimate goal of our creation is to return to the Father. The purpose of our mortality is to learn and to choose to subjugate the carnal desires of the flesh in order to allow the growth of our spirit. We are all striving to meld the spriit and the flesh into a sacred union.

What you have proposed above is a conscious choice to sidestep our purpose for a different purpose; one where you choose to close your eyes to the eternities for a sole focus on mortality. Does this sound like eat, drink, and be merry to you? I find that this is only a new reflection of that old premise.

What are the benefits of trying to ignore God's will for us?

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Do the positive and negative experiences in this life determine weak 'what-ifs' greatly in your individual experience?

If so, what are the developing or consistent theological ideas that form or remain?

I’m not sure if I understand this, but here’s a try:

As I consider my weaknesses, the greatest is lacking the wherewithal to remove them as immediately as I would like. This wherewithal may be a function of faith, understanding, genetics, etc. So I do the best I can to hold to the iron rod with what talents I do possess.

Gradually over time, I notice the barely perceptible dissipation of m weaknesses, or greater confidence that they will be overcome or that opportunities will be given me to do so, or I get a flash of insight into what life would be like without them.

I have learned that whatever weakness that might be removed only brings a new awareness of new weaknesses that have yet to be removed. So I think it is the attitude we have toward our weaknesses that allow us to be faithful, hopeful and charitable about them and thus prepared for all the blessings the Lord offers us in His due time.

If I were to be offered alleviation from my #1 weakness in an instant, I would probably say “yes”, but I know that it would open the gate of awareness of other impediments that would prove to be just as frustrating, requiring the same or greater faith on my part (either to overcome or endure).

Just as we will always have the poor among us, we will always have personal variations from perfection within ourselves. That principle doesn’t prevent us from doing something about the problems at hand, and it helps us faithfully prioritize what we need to be doing.

As an adult convert I remember a time when I could not wrap my mind around harmonious families, living in the Celestial Kingdom, etc. There seemed to be more immediate practical concerns to address first. So I held to the iron rod and was consistent and diligent in performing the basic duties of our religion. At some point I broke through that barrier, so I can vouch for the principle of hanging in there and facing new challenges not seen before. The basics always apply.

Embracing with faith, hope and charity the “blessings of trial, of suffering, of pain, of joy, of peace, etc. in this mortal existence” is a good attitude to have and is the best formula for progress and victory in Christ.

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I think what I find the most peace in is my belief that God will bring me to the place where I will be the happiest. If that is the highest glory of the celestial kingdom or the farthest reaches of outer darkness, I know that a loving heavenly father has put me there because that is where I need to be.

Edited by Saints Alive
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I don't know of any theologies that form... I just know that weaknesses are meant to be overcome, through Christ =). I love that verse in Ether, and yeah... wouldn't trade my weaknesses for someone else's... they are my trials to pass, that father has allowed me to have =).

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Val, thank you for your post. Lord in Heaven this is a complicated topic you bring up. The ultimate goal of our creation is to return to the Father. The purpose of our mortality is to learn and to choose to subjugate the carnal desires of the flesh in order to allow the growth of our spirit. We are all striving to meld the spriit and the flesh into a sacred union.

What you have proposed above is a conscious choice to sidestep our purpose for a different purpose; one where you choose to close your eyes to the eternities for a sole focus on mortality. Does this sound like eat, drink, and be merry to you? I find that this is only a new reflection of that old premise.

What are the benefits of trying to ignore God's will for us?

You misunderstand me. This is not eat, drink and be merry. This is about focusing on the ultimate blessing that is mortality. This existence, in my understanding, is a means to more clearly experience God and all that God offers by way of spiritual growth, education, etc. The weaknesses that I have are some of my greatest blessings because they teach me compassion, charity, humility (this one happens the most), tolerance and love. It is immaculate what Godly blessings stem from the harder and painful blessings of mortality.

My sexual orientation is not a curse but a blessing in which I must do my best to cope with.

I am NOT advocating same-sex relations, premarital sex, disobedience to the WoW, etc. As someone stated before, Ether 12:6 is very appropriate.

To summarize, I believe that the JOURNEY is the ultimate blessing and not the DESTINATION.

Edited by Valentinus
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Hi Valentinus,

I’m not sure where you are at with the LDS Church, but I don’t see too much of what you wrote that believing Mormons would take issue with. Of course we would all like to see you make it back to your Heavenly Father in the celestial kingdom. That is what we are all hopefully striving for, but I know sometimes it can be overwhelming to think about and not easy to wrap our minds around. That is why I believe strongly in the old adage to “take it one day at a time.”

But you have a beautiful testimony and you love Heavenly Father. You are very open to learning from your challenges and life experiences. That is all any of us can really do. I hope you never let that go. With that, I think you can and will get through this mortal experience just great and you will be prepared for everything that Heavenly Father has in store for you in the next life.

I wish you the best, no matter where your life takes you.

Sky

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Hi Valentinus,

I’m not sure where you are at with the LDS Church, but I don’t see too much of what you wrote that believing Mormons would take issue with. Of course we would all like to see you make it back to your Heavenly Father in the celestial kingdom. That is what we are all hopefully striving for, but I know sometimes it can be overwhelming to think about and not easy to wrap our minds around. That is why I believe strongly in the old adage to “take it one day at a time.”

But you have a beautiful testimony and you love Heavenly Father. You are very open to learning from your challenges and life experiences. That is all any of us can really do. I hope you never let that go. With that, I think you can and will get through this mortal experience just great and you will be prepared for everything that Heavenly Father has in store for you in the next life.

I wish you the best, no matter where your life takes you.

Sky

Thanks, Sky.

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