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Sunday School Non Sequitur


volgadon

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Had to share.

Today the Sunday School teacher asked the class the following question.

"What do we do in the church today intead of observing the Law of Moses?" One of the class members answerd, "We pay tithing!"

Maybe he wasn't too far off; Law of Moses:Gospel as Law of Tithing:Law of Consecration. The lesser law prepares us for the greater law.

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Maybe he wasn't too far off; Law of Moses:Gospel as Law of Tithing:Law of Consecration. The lesser law prepares us for the greater law.

The Sunday School lesson was the one about Cornelius and about deciding that gentiles didn't have to follow the Law of Moses. The teacher asked what we replaced the Law of Moses with. Answering tithing makes absolutely no sense sinces tithes were a prominent feature of the Law of Moses.

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?

Given the OP, I thought perhaps the student might have meant that we use the law of tithing as a schoolmaster for the higher law of consecration. But post #4 shows the idea behind the question and how the response is a logical non-sequitur.

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The Sunday School lesson was the one about Cornelius and about deciding that gentiles didn't have to follow the Law of Moses. The teacher asked what we replaced the Law of Moses with. Answering tithing makes absolutely no sense sinces tithes were a prominent feature of the Law of Moses.

How did the instructor respond?

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How did the instructor respond?

He acknolwedged it but then moved on as he was looking for specific answers. It didn't seem to me that he had any objections to the observation beyond its taking time away from a specific answer he wanted, which was "a broken heart and contrite spirit."

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He acknolwedged it but then moved on as he was looking for specific answers. It didn't seem to me that he had any objections to the observation beyond its taking time away from a specific answer he wanted, which was "a broken heart and contrite spirit."

Hopefully it wasn't too much of a distraction. In answer to the question, "What can we do to be more charitable in our lives?" one person said, "Whatever you do, don't give away 10 pounds of cheddar cheese to (ethnic group) because we need different foods and vitamins than (other ethnic group), that is why we're healthier, stronger and have better color than (the other ethnic group)" which resulted in a tangent on the subject of cheese and ethnicity lasting several minutes.

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Hopefully it wasn't too much of a distraction. In answer to the question, "What can we do to be more charitable in our lives?" one person said, "Whatever you do, don't give away 10 pounds of cheddar cheese to (ethnic group) because we need different foods and vitamins than (other ethnic group), that is why we're healthier, stronger and have better color than (the other ethnic group)" which resulted in a tangent on the subject of cheese and ethnicity lasting several minutes.

If that isn't the fullness of the gospel, I don't know what is.

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If that isn't the fullness of the gospel, I don't know what is.

My thoughts exactly! (Anybody want some cheese? :D)

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I always thought the law of Moses was, well the law .... much like an eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth. The Law of Moses embodies rules and commandments themselves with all of the focus on them, rather than the reason why we have rules and commandments. The 10 commandments themselves were the 2nd set, the lesser law because when Moses came down off the mountain the first set was so far beyond the people's comprehension, that Moses destroyed them, and went back up and got the second set.

In many ways people in their lives simply place rules and commandments as measuring points to determine worthiness of others and/or themselves. The point is that they are not absolute. What really matters is the reason why we keep them. If we understand the love of Christ we really don’t need a million commandments as we have our own internal direction on what to do and how to act in any situation.

When our ox is in the mire, do we break the Sabbath to rescue it? Is the love we have towards a creature that helps to sustain us and labors for us, less than the commandment for itself keeping the Sabbath day holy? Or, do we rescue the beast?

Luke 14: 5 And answered them, saying, Which of you shall have an a$$ or an ox fallen into a pit, and will not straightway pull him out on the Sabbath day?

Perhaps charity, being the pure love of Christ, is what the student meant when he talked about tithing. It’s ironic, that Christ gave his life so that we could understand the concept of love. The sacrifice of one person, the actual son of God, so that others might live forever compared to sacrificing a lamb as a matter of protocol under the Law of Moses.

Matthew 22

36 Master, which is the great commandment in the law?

37 Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.

38 This is the first and great commandment.

39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

40 On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

So, perhaps the greater law, that Moses came down with first was a simple as that. Love God, and love your neighbor. Which brings a new meaning to the phrase, "if you love him, keep his commandments". It’s not this, "when you keep his commandments, you love him". But rather, if you understand the concept of Love and how it drives the decisions we make, and or actions, its those actions based on Love naturally put you on a level of understanding with Christ. Perhaps it should read, "When you love him, you will (naturally) keep his commandments".

I suppose we can spend our entire life looking for rules to keep which are embedded in the speeches and talks to those that preach to us. We can read a million pages of scripture looking for every single law and commandment for every situation. In the end, I suppose we would be no better off that the Jews during the time of Jesus who masterfully had laws for every single thing. Then comes Jesus, and says that he is fulfilling the law. But he did, it was a sacrifice so that we might have some glimmer of truth and the actual possibilities of what Love can do. Or we can just keep reading and looking for laws to keep.

In the end, the real reason we read the scriptures is to find examples of love in real life, even if it was real life 2000 years ago. Perhaps this is why scriptures are timeless.

Edited by Messenger
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My thoughts exactly! (Anybody want some cheese? :D)

If I but had the voice of an angel! The only question remains, which is the true cheese? I say feta.

-Cheese for the Cacausains! Both begin with a C!

-Don't the Chinese also?

-Don't worry about the mysteries of the gospel.

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Had to share.

Today the Sunday School teacher asked the class the following question.

"What do we do in the church today intead of observing the Law of Moses?" One of the class members answerd, "We pay tithing!"

You've heard of people bringing journals to Church or other meetings with the intention of recording personal insights - especially when moved upon by the Spirit. However, I tend to want to record all the dumb things people say instead.

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