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Baptizing The Dead


Beck

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I am not a Mormon but I was wondering if my father, who died about 20 years ago, would have been baptized at the Mormon Temple. It is my understanding that everyone, regardless of their faith, is baptized at the Temple. If he was, how can that be proven. Is there a way I could have his baptism verified either on-line of by letter. Thanks.

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I am not a Mormon but I was wondering if my father, who died about 20 years ago, would have been baptized at the Mormon Temple. It is my understanding that everyone, regardless of their faith, is baptized at the Temple. If he was, how can that be proven. Is there a way I could have his baptism verified either on-line of by letter. Thanks.

To make sure he was or not you probably would have to write the Church Headquarters for that

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Here's a good link that will explain the basics of why mormons believe in baptism for the dead. Hope that helps. (Though the link does not state this, it's important to know as well that mormons believe that whether or not to accept the baptism remains the right of the deceased person. We do not believe that baptism can ever be forced upon someone.)

And i agree with Duncan, i think you'd have to contact the church directly to find out about your father. If he has close relatives who are members, then there is a good chance his baptism has been performed, but if you don't then it's less likely.

Is it church teaching that everyone, regardless of their religion or non-religion, is baptized at the Temple?

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I am not a Mormon but I was wondering if my father, who died about 20 years ago, would have been baptized at the Mormon Temple. It is my understanding that everyone, regardless of their faith, is baptized at the Temple. If he was, how can that be proven. Is there a way I could have his baptism verified either on-line of by letter. Thanks.

First, is there some reason you think he might have had this work done for him? If you are not a member and you have no relatives who are members, it is unlikely the work was done. LDS are charged with identifying their dead family members through genealogy and doing the temple work by proxy, but at this point, I believe it is stressed that we do work for our own family lines--and if we do it for someone who is not family, we should have some tie to the dead person.

LDS believe that one cannot enter where God is without the ordinance of baptism--and I believe that is also the teaching of most Christian faiths as the Bible teaches that baptism is essential to be with God in the afterlife--nothing new or different about that. What is different is that while other faiths have no way to offer this saving ordinance to the billions who died without the opportunity and so are just 'out of luck', LDS believe that we can do the work on behalf of the dead--and they then have the opportunity to either accept or reject this ordinance, on the other side.

Please note that having one's temple work done does not make a person LDS. The deceased must choose to accept the work done for them or it is useless and not binding.

So, if you have active LDS relatives who might have done his work in the last 19 years, then you could ask them.

If you don't want to ask them, you could also visit an LDS family history center (you can find them listed in the phone book or on the internet) and you'll find nice people who can help you find out if his work was done.

Some non-LDS have misconceptions about the work we do in the Temple on behalf of the dead. When we complete the Temple work for the deceased, they are not considered a 'member' of the LDS church--the dead have their 'agency', free will or ability to choose on the other side, just as we do here on earth. They must either accept or reject the work we've done on their behalf.

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I am not a Mormon but I was wondering if my father, who died about 20 years ago, would have been baptized at the Mormon Temple.

One is tempted to ask why you care.

If we have no Priesthood, as you, not being "a Mormon", must believe, then nothing we do is of any value.

If we do, all that's happened is that your father now has the opportuinitiy to accept the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the spirit world where he now is.

In either case, nothing has been inalterably done. But in the worst case, we've wasted our time and resources doing an empty ritual. In the best case, your father is happier than he was twenty years ago.

Again: what's your concern?

Lehi

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It is my understanding that everyone, regardless of their faith, is baptized at the Temple.

BTW, we do not "baptize the dead". We baptize, by living proxy, for (i.e., on behalf of) of the dead. There is a distinction. Our ceremonies are not macabre in any sense, and we do not participate in anything that could, even broadly, be considered "necromancy".

Terminology can be instructive or destructive. Using the corret phrase reduces misunderstandings.

Lehi

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Is it church teaching that everyone, regardless of their religion or non-religion, is baptized at the Temple?

I think I answered this in my post but just in case, here is the answer.

It is 'church teaching' that everyone must be baptized by immersion by one having authority from God in order to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Jesus explained this clearly to Nicodemus and he showed through his own example when he was baptized by John.

If you are someone who reads the Bible, I think you will recognize that the Bible teaches this as well. As Jesus said 'Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter the Kingdom of God'. The Book of Mormon also makes this clear that it is a requirement if we wish to return to live with God. Jesus said 'ye must repent, and be baptized in my name, and become as a little child or ye can in nowise inherit the Kingdom of God'.

For LDS, Baptism by immersion by one having the proper priesthood authority to accomplish the work is one of the Principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, there's no getting around it.

We do not recognize the baptisms of other religions because we do not believe they are binding since they were not done by proper authority and in the proper manner. Therefore, anyone who desires to live with God again, MUST be baptized properly. To give this opportunity to all of God's children, the Lord allows for this ordinance to be completed in a special place, set aside and dedicated for this purpose(LDS Temples) and then, if it is accepted by the dead, it is thoroughly binding in Heaven and allows the person to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.

We believe that all God's children should be able to return and live with him--regardless of when or where they lived in their time on earth. Because of this belief, a large part of church resources and members' time is spent providing these ordinances vicariously for the dead, if they'll accept them.

LDS are encouraged to do 'Temple work' (provide these ordinances by proxy or in behalf of) for their dead relatives and so we search and prepare our genealogy to provide names of the dead for this work. Of course, we are only a small group of people compared to all the billions who live on the earth, Logistically and without divine help and the 'Millenial Era (1,000 years when Jesus Christ will reign on the earth), we can't expect to do this work for every living soul in our lifetimes--but we expect that a loving God who desires to save all his children (who wish to be with him) and we'll be helped to complete it as all should have the opportunity to accept or reject this work.

At this point, we focus on our own family lines, but the plan is that eventually, all will have this work done for them.

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I am not a Mormon but I was wondering if my father, who died about 20 years ago, would have been baptized at the Mormon Temple. It is my understanding that everyone, regardless of their faith, is baptized at the Temple. If he was, how can that be proven. Is there a way I could have his baptism verified either on-line of by letter. Thanks.

Something that hasn't been mentioned in this thread is that if your father was baptized after his death, then he owes the LDS Church for back-tithing, and you may be required to pay it for him. You might get a letter from the Church describing how best to compute your father's lifetime estimated earnings and how to work out an installment plan to pay the tithing (along with a calculation for inflation-adjustment and interest).

;)

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Something that hasn't been mentioned in this thread is that if your father was baptized after his death, then he owes the LDS Church for back-tithing, and you may be required to pay it for him. You might get a letter from the Church describing how best to compute your father's lifetime estimated earnings and how to work out an installment plan to pay the tithing (along with a calculation for inflation-adjustment and interest).

;)

You are so evil :-p

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Something that hasn't been mentioned in this thread is that if your father was baptized after his death, then he owes the LDS Church for back-tithing, and you may be required to pay it for him. You might get a letter from the Church describing how best to compute your father's lifetime estimated earnings and how to work out an installment plan to pay the tithing (along with a calculation for inflation-adjustment and interest).

;)

As Beck is not a member of the church, I will happily receive checks or money orders, place them in the customary gray envelopes, fill out donation slips, and present him with tax deductible receipts in a timely fashion. Since he's new around these parts, I'll even offer these services at a substantial discount. (Beck, you can PM me for details.)

;)

PS Thanks for the laugh Cinepro.

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