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Faith Runs In Families


Duncan

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

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I wouldn't think the phrase relates to individual faith. Rather it is about the fact in the LDS faith or any other, or even in sectarian things, what we hear within the confines of our family, what we live there is fundamental to who we are. So when we learn the songs, and stories of a faith every other action is measured in relationship to those things. It can be easier to live a faith that is part of family tradition, particularly when that faith is lived by full example of our Savior's love. (For some kids it also gives an easy rebellion target).

I don't think it means that everyone in that family will have the same kinds of faith or experience faith in the same way, or that if your personality is more analytical that you are not a person of faith or don't belong in that family.

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

I would say it does. Israel is a big family, the descendants of Noah form an even bigger family. Faith runs in families, and so the loss of faith is an individual matter.

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who said "God has no grandchildren, only sons and daughters" ? anyways, it's a good quote and I think it is true - no such thing as borrowed / or inherited light... I would like to believe that who we are is dictated by neither nature nor nurture - that our spirit has agency / not some robot just reacting / marching dutifully in line with what it is taught.. but then yes, there are trends for people to stay in certain circles and what to make of this? perhaps it is not by accident that we are placed in the family that we find ourselves within? ... there is the BoM cycle too - good - blessed - prideful - downfall - humbled - repent - good - blessed etc. etc., seems to be a generational thing, one generation is horrible bringing catastrophe, followed by a humble/teachable next generation? I fear it takes quite a lot to humiliate someone though - we live in a society (at least if you live in the US) that protects people from the most heinous consequences of their actions... perhaps this has disrupted the cycle leaving some in a perpetual state of pride? ... it is interesting to see, now that I have kids, the interplay of the generations with one another - how one generation can be so different from the previous one, and yet so similar... there are blessings, and curses, that somehow follow family lines, and I can't help but think it is not by accident that our spirits are placed within the families that we find ourselves in... "What therefore God hath joined together..." ~ Mark 10:9

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

Sounds like a Utah thing. We had a granddaughter of a Prophet and a granddaughter of an Apostle in my ward in SoCal and they both had some funny (in a tragic kind of way) stories about Utah traditions people carry about families and lineage.

For example, the granddaughter of the Apostle fell in love with a guy who wasn't related to any General Authorities and her parents were very upset at the idea of her marrying someone who wasn't connected to the Church Office Building in some way, and her Apostle grandfather had to step in and talk some sense into them. :wacko:

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

I'm about as far away from being well connected Church-wise as one can get, but I'm also the beneficiary of my parents' faithfulness; consequently, I feel to a certain extent that faith was a part of my 'inheritance.' Let me explain. My parents are/were (my father passed away from cancer a few years ago) very simple people who loved the Lord and trusted in Him and His restored gospel. As a result, gospel principles were never very hypothetical for us. We desperately needed something which would work, and we would quickly have discarded anything which didn't. I can remember so, so many experiences from my growing-up years where my parents gathered us together, explained to us a situation which was insurmountable on our own, and then asked us to join them in prayer and often fasting for the Lord's intervention/guidance/etc. The outcome was that I learnt whilst very young that God is real, that He genuinely answers faithful petitions, and that He very much will intervene in miraculous ways in our lives.

I could also have figured all of this out on my own, so, without such experiences, I wouldn't have been doomed, as you suggest, but it sure has made my life easier to have such knowledge under my belt from a very young age. If you're married and have children, I would suggest you not rob your family of such a valuable gift of faith.

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I'm about as far away from being well connected Church-wise as one can get

Thank you for sharing that; no effort of the Lord's humble is ever wasted.

My brother and I are the first in our family line to join the Church. Some 35 years later, my father joined the Church at age 82. We have reason to believe hundreds have joined posthumously. So where was the faith all these generations? Just dormant. I am grateful that it is now thriving in the hearts of the fourth and fifth generations. But that is an individual responsibility.

My parents never consistently went or took us to any church, but they exposed us to a general acknowledgment of Christianity being true; an expectation to keep an open mind and to be honest; and my mother taught us the Lord's prayer and recited it with us every night before bed until we reached the age of age ten or so. My wife was Catholic, and she attributes her faith as a child to her eventually recognizing the truth and joining the Church as a young adult. She doesn't describe her parents as being particularly faithful, but they did make her go to church. So in each case, the parental faith may have been compared to a mustard seed, but that seemed to be enough.

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

Heh, that's a crock. My wife and I are very full of faith, and only one of our kids is still active in Church, and almost all of his kids are inactive, despite having both parents faithful members, and both sets of grandparents.

There MAY be a faith gene, but it is most certainly not dominant, because so many of its holders are a bunch of backsliders.

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Heh, that's a crock. My wife and I are very full of faith, and only one of our kids is still active in Church, and almost all of his kids are inactive, despite having both parents faithful members, and both sets of grandparents.

There MAY be a faith gene, but it is most certainly not dominant, because so many of its holders are a bunch of backsliders.

That is what I was thinking as well, the fellow who I heard it from as I say is connected to like everybody it seems and he goes right back to Joseph Smith who I am fairly confident his ancestors weren't LDS! I kind of thought him saying it is self serving

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Sounds like a Utah thing. We had a granddaughter of a Prophet and a granddaughter of an Apostle in my ward in SoCal and they both had some funny (in a tragic kind of way) stories about Utah traditions people carry about families and lineage.

For example, the granddaughter of the Apostle fell in love with a guy who wasn't related to any General Authorities and her parents were very upset at the idea of her marrying someone who wasn't connected to the Church Office Building in some way, and her Apostle grandfather had to step in and talk some sense into them. :wacko:

I'm glad the Apostle grandfather straightened them out.

Down with hereditary aristocracies!

Regards,

Pahoran

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Faith runs in families in the sense that faithful parents perpetuate faith by teaching it to their children. Unfathful parents can and do pertetuate unfaithfulness in their children though that does not preclude children from becomming faithful. It just makes it harder.

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I seem to remember that the vast majority of people everywhere cling to the faith of their parents. Under normal circumstances, it's very rare for a Muslim to become a Christian or v.v. WIthin most major religions, there are enough denominations to fit the individual perspective but on the whole, if you're born a Sikh, chances are you'll die one too.

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I'm glad the Apostle grandfather straightened them out.

Down with hereditary aristocracies!

Regards,

Pahoran

Yes, but they were exiled to Southern California nonetheless.

This is the picture from their moving announcement.

adam-eve.jpg

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I have heard a certain person who seems to be well connected in certain circles in the Church say that faith runs in families. My question is what if your parents weren't members of are inactive or something, are you now not allowed or you can't have faith? My parenst had faithful parents in other Churches but my dad has always been hot and cold when it comes to Church, so am I unfaithfu because of him. Why would someone say that faith runs in families?

My own experience....I was raised in a very devout LDS family. My parents attended the temple regulalrly, we had FHE regularly, I had the standard LDS youth experiences growing up (primary, scouts, seminary, etc.). Studying the BoM, fasting, family prayer, etc. were all standard in our home. Many of our family vacations were spent visiting church historical sites (including visits to the Sacred Grove, Hill Cumorah, Nauvoo.....and these weren't exactly just around the corner; I was rasied in southern california). My parents were considered strong leaders in our ward and by my own account were fantastic parents.

Yet, here I am, an atheist who left the LDS church in my mid-twenties, with no plans to raise my children in organized religion.

I guess that there is an exception to every rule.

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My own experience....I was raised in a very devout LDS family. My parents attended the temple regulalrly, we had FHE regularly, I had the standard LDS youth experiences growing up (primary, scouts, seminary, etc.). Studying the BoM, fasting, family prayer, etc. were all standard in our home. Many of our family vacations were spent visiting church historical sites (including visits to the Sacred Grove, Hill Cumorah, Nauvoo.....and these weren't exactly just around the corner; I was rasied in southern california). My parents were considered strong leaders in our ward and by my own account were fantastic parents.

Yet, here I am, an atheist who left the LDS church in my mid-twenties, with no plans to raise my children in organized religion.

I guess that there is an exception to every rule.

thank you for sharing that! I was thinking that the man who was saying this was self serving how the faith of his ancestry was better then others and he inherited this or something so I was wondering. My Dad was borna dn raised in Nazi Germany, the first 13 years of his was during the entire Nazi experience and he was turned totally off from certain things and I can relate about how your folks (or parent in my case) do one thing and then you do the total opposite

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