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Do You See A Good/Moral God Overall?


elguanteloko

Do you see a good/moral God overall?  

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  1. 1. Do you see a good/moral God overall?



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And man made God in his own image. To say God is moral is to project a human construct onto deity. He may be moral he may not. i think you just have to look at the evidence and see. If you look at the scriptures for information you will find a God that seems oth moral and immoral. Some times he is petty vindictive and seems to appreciate blood flowing in the streets. Other times he is kind and benevolent. Maybe God has his ups and downs like us.

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And man made God in his own image. To say God is moral is to project a human construct onto deity. He may be moral he may not. i think you just have to look at the evidence and see. If you look at the scriptures for information you will find a God that seems oth moral and immoral. Some times he is petty vindictive and seems to appreciate blood flowing in the streets. Other times he is kind and benevolent. Maybe God has his ups and downs like us.

haha! Yes, maybe.

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Yes--as the ultimate arbiter of right and wrong and as someone describes himself as "good" and "perfect", I don't see how he can be anything but moral. What do you mean when you say "moral"?

But, how do you know he is the "ultimate arbiter of right and wrong" in a just way? All the data you have to make that assessment must point, first of all, to God being either good or bad, just or unjust. You can't use what God said about himself to conclude he is in fact what he said he is.

Since you can't use these reasons you gave then I think you have to give other ones. Why do you see a good God?

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Yes, I see a good God. My explanation for this evolves throughout my lifetime. Currently it is because, as I act with faith upon all the things I attribute to Him, and look back upon my life recognizing His benevolent involvement with or without my awareness at the time, and my increasing lack of fear for my future, and my increasing concern with and involvement in the blessing of others, I often wake up before the alarm with feelings of great rejoicing, gratitude and praise for Him.

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Purposefully giving my son problems so he can 'become better' while overcoming them, is that moral?

Yes.

I'm going to guess that you aren't a parent yet.

I make my children suffer through lessons and loads of schoolwork in spite of the fact that they can't presently appreciate the value of this adversity. I make them do laundry, dishes, yardwork, and all sorts of menial labor because I know these skills are valuable to a successful adulthood even if they think I'm just assigning meaningless chores. I make them take responsibility for their mistakes, apologize when they are wrong, and make restitution when they can because I know they will be happier, healthier adults and better human beings if they care about others as much as they care about themselves.

You think when my 12 year old is mowing the lawn, he appreciates the growing strength in his arms from pushing uphill? Or that my 8 year old believes there is lifelong merit in learning good study habits? No way.

You'd better believe I give them problems to resolve so they can mature!

Not only is this moral, it is an act of great love.

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But, how do you know he is the "ultimate arbiter of right and wrong" in a just way? All the data you have to make that assessment must point, first of all, to God being either good or bad, just or unjust. You can't use what God said about himself to conclude he is in fact what he said he is.

Since you can't use these reasons you gave then I think you have to give other ones. Why do you see a good God?

How do you define moral? I'll tack on how do you define good, too? Your answer to these question, of course, will affect your answer to the poll question. With respect to topics like this, I define good/right/moral as what God does and what he wants men to do, and bad/wrong/evil (/sin) as what God does not want men to do, then he is, by very definition, good/moral.

Deciding what evidence someone can use to conclude things is an interesting activity. When you get down to it, can I conclude anything other than that it seems to me that I experience some things? From there, I simply must speculate about anything else. From what I seem to have experienced, I believe God exists as he has described himself, which includes being the ultimate judge and, thus, the ultimate arbiter of right and wrong.

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Purposefully giving my son problems so he can 'become better' while overcoming them, is that moral?

Yep. Why'd he make me Autistic, or to struggle with the weaknesses I do?

You may think that's harsh... and it is. But it is also very effective. And it works. Really well. It brings out the best in people - trials bring out the best, and the worst - but it's the best that matters.

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Purposefully giving my son problems so he can 'become better' while overcoming them, is that moral?

I agree with MNG. We definitely give our children challenges to help them grow. We would be irresponsible if we didn't. You aren't seriously questioning that idea?

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Why?

I believe that imoral being can not be Exalted God.

What is moral? Moral is when I believe that to dress modestly is right and good thing to do and I dress modestly.

What is imoral? Imoral is when I believe that to dress modestly is right and good thing to do and I dress unmodestly any way.

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I couldn't answer the question because of the word "overall." God is Good and in fact is the definition of Good. He could not operate in the Universe were it otherwise. That is why Satan's plan couldn't work; it would have disrupted what was good and best for man and thwarted the purpose of organizing the worlds and the spirits in them

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Although "God" has all traits and attributes that we observe and more than we can possibly imagine, it is by faith/trust that we follow our feelings toward joyful things. Comeupance for engaging in bad things is the universal law of returns that "God" has put in place to create an appreciation of what Joy is. Morality and goodness are never-changing attributes and "God" is the author and champion of them: so all truth testifies.

I selected "Other" because I do not believe that "God" is only all goodness and morality: "God" chooses to act morally and good, but is perfectly aware of all the other traits that are in opposition to goodness and morals....

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Yes.

I'm going to guess that you aren't a parent yet.

I make my children suffer through lessons and loads of schoolwork in spite of the fact that they can't presently appreciate the value of this adversity. I make them do laundry, dishes, yardwork, and all sorts of menial labor because I know these skills are valuable to a successful adulthood even if they think I'm just assigning meaningless chores. I make them take responsibility for their mistakes, apologize when they are wrong, and make restitution when they can because I know they will be happier, healthier adults and better human beings if they care about others as much as they care about themselves.

You think when my 12 year old is mowing the lawn, he appreciates the growing strength in his arms from pushing uphill? Or that my 8 year old believes there is lifelong merit in learning good study habits? No way.

You'd better believe I give them problems to resolve so they can mature!

Not only is this moral, it is an act of great love.

It is not a moral equivalent to compare doing chores with the atrocities that many individuals suffer through in their life. If I said I tortured my children in a very cruel way so that they would appreciate it when they were not being tortured that would not be moral?

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It is not a moral equivalent to compare doing chores with the atrocities that many individuals suffer through in their life. If I said I tortured my children in a very cruel way so that they would appreciate it when they were not being tortured that would not be moral?

God doesn't turture His children.

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It is not a moral equivalent to compare doing chores with the atrocities that many individuals suffer through in their life. If I said I tortured my children in a very cruel way so that they would appreciate it when they were not being tortured that would not be moral?

I didn't equate those things.

I responded to this question:

Purposefully giving my son problems so he can 'become better' while overcoming them, is that moral?

If a parent sends a child to school to get an education and the child is bullied, harrassed, and abused at school, was the parent's decision to educate immoral?

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Why or why not? (or explain "other")

I see God as perfect goodness; the ideal, in all things.

I'm not sure why you are asking this question, but I'm guessing it "might" have something to do with all of the evil you see in the world? I know that is what some atheists point to, in denouncing God. The idea that a perfectly good and loving God could not have made this place. But, the evil we see here, comes from our lack of knowing, trusting and following Christ, IMO. God allows it, because (as others have mentioned) it promotes growth. We, hopefully, learn from our mistakes. God is the ideal, the perfection, that should be our ultimate goal.

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