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Screachers?


LeSellers

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While this is true, I need a good laugh today.

Lehi

Can't help you with them, but in a similar vein.

Seems there was a group of Ku Klux Klansmen in Texas who heard that some Pagans were holding a ritual out in the woods somewhere. Having run out of other minorities to harass, they decided to get back to their roots and practice some religious bigotry in addition to the usual racial intolerance and break up the party with a good ol' cross-burning.

So anyway, these fellows loaded up some lumber and a couple of cans of gasoline and went out hunting for these Pagans they'd heard about, hoping to catch them dancing nekkid around a fire or something.

They found the spot where the other vehicles were parked and donned their hoods. Grabbing the lumber and gasoline, they assembled a cross and strode off into the woods, confident that they'd scare any remaining pants off the fluffybunny Pagans.

They were a little disconcerted to find themselves looking at the business end of at least 2 spears, a couple of swords, assorted knives, and more than one firearm. They'd crashed an Asatru blot and didn't realize that not all Pagans are pacifists.

From somewhere behind the hardware, a voice called out "If that cross goes up, you're getting nailed to it. I've got my hammer right here..."

The Klansmen left in a bit of a hurry, it's said.

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Aaron Shafovaloff was there, though I didn't get a chance to speak with him.

wasn't there, but his usual minions were. Incidentally, as I was crossing the street Saturday afternoon I bumped into Allen Wyatt and Craig Ray of FAIR. ;)

I'd love to make a trip down to conference just to talk with them. This last weekend was way too rushed for me. Perhaps some of us could set up a car pool this summer for Bob (the Wolfman) Vukich's annual "Hug an Anti at Manti" trip.

I did however, get the chance to briefly speak with one of the protesters, who was holding up a large sign claiming that Archaeology and Anthropology had proven the authenticity of the Bible. :P

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I did however, get the chance to briefly speak with one of the protesters, who was holding up a large sign claiming that Archaeology and Anthropology had proven the authenticity of the Bible.

That must have been fun.

Lehi

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That must have been fun.

Lehi

My mother-in-law was not pleased with what I said to him, namely because she accepts a literal 6,000 year old earth and rejects evolution, which flushed his anthropology argument down the toilet. Hence, why I look forward to making the trip on my own next time.

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I did however, get the chance to briefly speak with one of the protesters, who was holding up a large sign claiming that Archaeology and Anthropology had proven the authenticity of the Bible. :P

I read that one word "protestants".

Seems to fit anyway I guess.

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My mother-in-law was not pleased with what I said to him, namely because she accepts a literal 6,000 year old earth and rejects evolution, which flushed his anthropology argument down the toilet. Hence, why I look forward to making the trip on my own next time.

Please: more details on what you said, the protester's response, and your mother-in-law's reaction.

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Please: more details on what you said, the protester's response, and your mother-in-law's reaction.

I can't remember exactly what I said, because our conversation did not last more than a minute. But it went a little something like this:

ME: "What if archaeology has shown that the ancient Israelites believed in an anthropomorphic God...or should I say, the Israelites regarded themselves as theomorphic?

PROTESTER: "God doesn't have a body."

ME: "Archaeology and anthropology confirm the ancient Israelites believed this. Would you say that evolution is supported by the Bible?"

PROTESTER: "Of course not."

ME: "How utterly inconvenient for you that the entire field of anthropology is intrinsically connected with a worldview that supports evolution and an earth much older than 6,000 years."

PROTESTER: "There isn't a single thing on earth older than 5,000 years."

ME: "According to whom?"

PROTESTER: "The Bible."

ME: "Wow. that's all I can say. Wow."

PROTESTER: "God's word has that type of impact on people."

At this point, my mother-in-law shuffled us on telling me I shouldn't support evolution and that it "goes against what the prophets teach." She never got over it for the rest of the weekend. My wife, visibly upset by the contention, urged me to "drop it" so I did. It was a long drive back to Rexburg Sunday afternoon but everything is fine now. Maybe my mother in law will like me again when our daughter is born.

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I can't remember exactly what I said, because our conversation did not last more than a minute. But it went a little something like this:

ME: "What if archaeology has shown that the ancient Israelites believed in an anthropomorphic God...or should I say, the Israelites regarded themselves as theomorphic?

PROTESTER: "God doesn't have a body."

ME: "Archaeology and anthropology confirm the ancient Israelites believed this. Would you say that evolution is supported by the Bible?"

PROTESTER: "Of course not."

ME: "How utterly inconvenient for you that the entire field of anthropology is intrinsically connected with a worldview that supports evolution and an earth much older than 6,000 years."

PROTESTER: "There isn't a single thing on earth older than 5,000 years."

ME: "According to whom?"

PROTESTER: "The Bible."

ME: "Wow. that's all I can say. Wow."

PROTESTER: "God's word has that type of impact on people."

At this point, my mother-in-law shuffled us on telling me I shouldn't support evolution and that it "goes against what the prophets teach." She never got over it for the rest of the weekend. My wife, visibly upset by the contention, urged me to "drop it" so I did. It was a long drive back to Rexburg Sunday afternoon but everything is fine now. Maybe my mother in law will like me again when our daughter is born.

Did she keep bringing it up?

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Were the number of Antis at GC about the same, more, or less than previous GC's? Just curious.

When I attended the LA Religious Education Congress with 20,000+ enthusiastic Catholics, the number of protesters was significantly down from years past. It's not that I paid much attention before but you do note the quietness during lunch time and you wonder where the 'anti' entertainment ran off too... :P

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Did she keep bringing it up?

My mother in law has a tendency to "shun" those with opposing opinions. She kept at it until I was ready to leave after being in Utah less than 24 hours. For some reason I'm not fond of being treated like I'm ten.

As for the number of protesters there, I wouldn't put their number above twelve. That is a liberal estimate. I was pleased to see the bagpiper there playing again this year (and incidentally, drowning out most of the screeching). I've been sorely tempted to start piping again, but it's been a few months since I've lived according to the tenets of 1 Kings 1:40.

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As for the number of protesters there, I wouldn't put their number above twelve. That is a liberal estimate. I was pleased to see the bagpiper there playing again this year (and incidentally, drowning out most of the screeching). I've been sorely tempted to start piping again, but it's been a few months since I've lived according to the tenets of 1 Kings 1:40.

That's significantly down then from a few years back. Perhaps the critics are getting a life? :P

I suspect the number of anti's handing out their literature to the youth/young adults in Madrid to be rather large as previous World Youth Days have shown. We shall see.

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That's significantly down then from a few years back. Perhaps the critics are getting a life? :P

I suspect the number of anti's handing out their literature to the youth/young adults in Madrid to be rather large as previous World Youth Days have shown. We shall see.

I know the Tanners and James White gave up protesting at GC because of the bad rap Reuben's cohorts had given them. I found it incredibly ironic that just a few years ago, there were fundamentalist/evangelical protesters there leading a counter protest to White. If anything I'd much rather see Greg Johnson there than anyone else.

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Perhaps the critics are getting a life? :P

That really seems to be the issue as I see it. I can't imagine how these people get the funding or the energy to keep it up- like the Westboro Baptists. They all hardly seem like closet millionaires!

How you could spend your live devoted to proving anyone "wrong" is beyond my comprehension.

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I can't remember exactly what I said, because our conversation did not last more than a minute. But it went a little something like this:

ME: "What if archaeology has shown that the ancient Israelites believed in an anthropomorphic God...or should I say, the Israelites regarded themselves as theomorphic?

PROTESTER: "God doesn't have a body."

ME: "Archaeology and anthropology confirm the ancient Israelites believed this. Would you say that evolution is supported by the Bible?"

PROTESTER: "Of course not."

ME: "How utterly inconvenient for you that the entire field of anthropology is intrinsically connected with a worldview that supports evolution and an earth much older than 6,000 years."

PROTESTER: "There isn't a single thing on earth older than 5,000 years."

ME: "According to whom?"

PROTESTER: "The Bible."

ME: "Wow. that's all I can say. Wow."

PROTESTER: "God's word has that type of impact on people."

At this point, my mother-in-law shuffled us on telling me I shouldn't support evolution and that it "goes against what the prophets teach." She never got over it for the rest of the weekend. My wife, visibly upset by the contention, urged me to "drop it" so I did. It was a long drive back to Rexburg Sunday afternoon but everything is fine now. Maybe my mother in law will like me again when our daughter is born.

Good argument though, pitting archaeology against those who shouldn't believe in it!

I'm definitely stealing that one!

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So, I haven't heard anything about the usual suspects on North Temple. Anyone there?

Lehi

As my 14-year-old and I left the priesthood session, it was raining. He made the comment that one advantage of the inclement weather was that it kept the naysayers away. I replied that apparently their hatred isn't strong enough for them to brave the elements.

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Lonnie Purshiphal (sp?) was there. I saw the archaeology guy. There was an old man on the east corner of the conference center square all by himself. He had a sign that said "AIDS" and the letters were part of a longer saying, I don't recall what it was, but he wasn't there because of AIDS the syndrome, or homosexuality which is sometimes connected to AIDS, he was a fundamentalist preacher of some sort. There were very few protesters as far as I saw.

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Aaron Shafovaloff was there, though I didn't get a chance to speak with him.

wasn't there, but his usual minions were. Incidentally, as I was crossing the street Saturday afternoon I bumped into Allen Wyatt and Craig Ray of FAIR. ;)

I'd love to make a trip down to conference just to talk with them. This last weekend was way too rushed for me. Perhaps some of us could set up a car pool this summer for Bob (the Wolfman) Vukich's annual "Hug an Anti at Manti" trip.

I did however, get the chance to briefly speak with one of the protesters, who was holding up a large sign claiming that Archaeology and Anthropology had proven the authenticity of the Bible. :P

Argh, this is what happens when a Danite doesn't let the right hand know what the left was doing. My fault. I was actually there for the priesthood session, but it was only that morning that I knew, and things were rushed. Oh well.

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Argh, this is what happens when a Danite doesn't let the right hand know what the left was doing. My fault. I was actually there for the priesthood session, but it was only that morning that I knew, and things were rushed. Oh well.

I think John Dehlin was at the priesthood session as well. I think I saw him in passing, though I can't be sure. If we had Aaron Nelson there as well, we probably could have caused a time warp/wormhole and actually bring Porter Rockwell back to life (or if we're lucky, the Masada freedom fighters or Hillel the Elder).

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I can't remember exactly what I said, because our conversation did not last more than a minute. But it went a little something like this:

ME: "What if archaeology has shown that the ancient Israelites believed in an anthropomorphic God...or should I say, the Israelites regarded themselves as theomorphic?

PROTESTER: "God doesn't have a body."

ME: "Archaeology and anthropology confirm the ancient Israelites believed this. Would you say that evolution is supported by the Bible?"

PROTESTER: "Of course not."

ME: "How utterly inconvenient for you that the entire field of anthropology is intrinsically connected with a worldview that supports evolution and an earth much older than 6,000 years."

PROTESTER: "There isn't a single thing on earth older than 5,000 years."

ME: "According to whom?"

PROTESTER: "The Bible."

ME: "Wow. that's all I can say. Wow."

PROTESTER: "God's word has that type of impact on people."

At this point, my mother-in-law shuffled us on telling me I shouldn't support evolution and that it "goes against what the prophets teach." She never got over it for the rest of the weekend. My wife, visibly upset by the contention, urged me to "drop it" so I did. It was a long drive back to Rexburg Sunday afternoon but everything is fine now. Maybe my mother in law will like me again when our daughter is born.

That was classic, thanks for sharing!

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