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Lehi's Name


USU78

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In the Nahom thread, it was suggested that Lehi may have been spelled Lamed-Heh-Yod instead of Lamed-Chet-Yod. In looking at the "Heh" possibility it's come to my attention that, if you put an "aleph" at the beginning and a "mem" at the end of the "Heh" Lehi, you get Eloheim, the title for G-d: lhi --> 'lhim.

So what does this mean? I'm not sure, though theophoric elements are all over the place in Hebrew place- and personal names. Here we appear to have a disguised theophoric for the Lehite Patriarch.

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In the Nahom thread, it was suggested that Lehi may have been spelled Lamed-Heh-Yod instead of Lamed-Chet-Yod. In looking at the "Heh" possibility it's come to my attention that, if you put an "aleph" at the beginning and a "mem" at the end of the "Heh" Lehi, you get Eloheim, the title for G-d: lhi --> 'lhim.

So what does this mean? I'm not sure, though theophoric elements are all over the place in Hebrew place- and personal names. Here we appear to have a disguised theophoric for the Lehite Patriarch.

I thought Lehi meant "jawbone" in Hebrew.

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I thought Lehi meant "jawbone" in Hebrew.

Hebrew has to h's in its alphabet, one that sounds like ours and another that is pronounced like Scottish loch. The letter chet, which I mentioned above, is contained in the Jawbone Lehi. There is, however, the possibility that we are dealing with a heh Lehi, whose definition escapes me just now (my books are all in boxes -- don't ask). It is this heh Lehi that can be turned into the name of G-d by adding letters to its beginning and end.

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Hebrew has to h's in its alphabet, one that sounds like ours and another that is pronounced like Scottish loch. The letter chet, which I mentioned above, is contained in the Jawbone Lehi. There is, however, the possibility that we are dealing with a heh Lehi, whose definition escapes me just now (my books are all in boxes -- don't ask). It is this heh Lehi that can be turned into the name of G-d by adding letters to its beginning and end.

As in Elehim?

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As in Elehim?

Vowels don't count. It's the consonants that are the big deal in Hebrew.

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I can't speak for Father Lehi, but if we take the English "jawbone" in its verbal form, then, for this Lehi, the name is irrefutably apropos.

Lehi

Badumbum

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Bump, on the hope that volga or another of our brilliant Hebrew scholars will comment on my observation.

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In the Nahom thread, it was suggested that Lehi may have been spelled Lamed-Heh-Yod instead of Lamed-Chet-Yod. In looking at the "Heh" possibility it's come to my attention that, if you put an "aleph" at the beginning and a "mem" at the end of the "Heh" Lehi, you get Eloheim, the title for G-d: lhi --> 'lhim.

So what does this mean? I'm not sure, though theophoric elements are all over the place in Hebrew place- and personal names. Here we appear to have a disguised theophoric for the Lehite Patriarch.

Does this mean that Loki, the god of Norse mythology, is really Elokim in disguise?

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Except that the jawbone, or cheek, or chin were not used as metaphors for speech, as far as we can tell. It is better to look at how the word is used in the Bible first, and try to reconstruct the meaning that way.

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Except that the jawbone, or cheek, or chin were not used as metaphors for speech, as far as we can tell. It is better to look at how the word is used in the Bible first, and try to reconstruct the meaning that way.

I was just saying that it made sense to me, not that it was the exact meaning. Just for clarification.

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Does this mean that Loki, the god of Norse mythology, is really Elokim in disguise?

No, but it does mean that Scandinavian Loki, in his German iteration as Loge, is the g-d of mid-priced opera seats. And fire sales.

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He is the Trickster, but probably not equivalent to Satan.

You aren't the first to make an implicit connection between the SW Amerind g-d/demig-d Coyote and Loki in their functions as trickster. Of course, there's no evidence that I've seen that Coyote has any end-days enemy function like Loki in les Affaires Baldur and Ragnaroek, so the parallel can't be taken too far.

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