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What is God trying to tell us?


Let_Us_Reason

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- that He loves each of us

- that He wants us to come unto Him so He can lead us home

- that there is no place His love can't reach

- that whatever our starting place is, all roads but one eventually converge and lead to salvation

- that the overriding commandments to love God and love our fellowmen are etched on our soul through the Light of Christ which we all have without respect of religious affiliation and those who draw close to God will embrace those commands regardless of which pew they sit in or what hymnal they sing out of

Personally, I have no problem accepting The words "My ways are not thy ways" and trusting that God knows what He's doing with the pure in heart in every sect and congregation. Eventually all churches pass away except of the Church of the Firstborn and just as He scatters, God gathers His own. So I try not to worry about where someone is when they feel the Spirit or which church they align to at the moment.

Love your answer. AMEN

When anyone lets dogma get in the way of Christ's message of love, charity, easing one anothers burdens then they are on the wrong path no matter what church they are in. A church is suppose to help guide you to being more Christ-like. As soon as any church divides people and makes it their mission to determine who is Christ;s followers and who is not, they have failed as a church and as followers of Christ.

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This probably will differ from lots of other opinions, but I think it could possibly be that the LDS church or any other church won't help someone who doesn't feel and accept they have a spiritual gap in their hearts that needs to be filled.

I was raised Catholic and forced to take PSR classes when I was eight, and it was one of the worst religious experiences of my life, and I didn't find what I felt I needed until I had came to know the LDS religion.

Off-Topic: Why can't I start new discussions?

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Off-Topic: Why can't I start new discussions?

You have to have 50 posts to do such. But if you have a topic you would like in mind, tell me and I will start a general thread about it, as long as there isn't another one going at the time =).

Best Wishes,

TAO

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No, it is possible to know that your own spiritual experiences are genuine. It is not normally possible to know if the spiritual experiences of someone else are genuine - because you don't have direct access to their experiences.

What you said is that there is no difference between the experiences granted different people in different religions. Unless you personally experienced every one of those spiritual experiences, this is impossible to know. At best you can say "the accounts of each seem very similar".

You were essentially restating the black swan fallacy. "I have never personally had an undeniably genuine spiritual experience, therefore there are none" is equivelent to saying "I have never encountered a black swan, therefore there are none."

This is yet another case of semantics obscuring communication.

I have had MANY spiritual experiences. Many occurred when I was struggling to be a TBM. Many have occurred and continue to occur since my religious world view changed. In my "TBM" days, I ascribed spiritual experiences to being specifically "Mormon" related or caused: the Church's dogmatic assertion to exclusivity disallowed that ANY other persuasion, religious or otherwise, could experience what "we" do with the Gift of the Holy Ghost: only just enough to tell them that the Church and restored gospel are true, then, if they deny it, the HG withdraws and they fall into darkness, etc. ad nauseam. I believed that my prayers were answered as a direct result of my believing in Mormonism: I expected the Millennium and even dreamed about it vividly with "Almalike" power.

Yet all of that was only a singular perspective.

I find, now, that spirituality is the shared gift of mankind. Praying is not even essential to it. Being "good" is not essential. Spirituality is as much a part of our thinking as breathing is part of the living physical body. And just as we are 99%+ unaware of breathing, so too we are unaware of spirituality. It really is like living in a forest and not being able to see the trees because the landscape is the only one we know. Spirituality becomes much more accessible consciously when we are finally aware of it. Like the Kung Fu adept, who learns to consciously discipline his breathing, a person who becomes conscious of the reality of spiritual things turns spirituality into a powerful tool to enhance life; in effect, empirical existence is nurtured by the spiritual in ways that only a conscious application of it can accomplish, like disciplined breathing nurtures the capacity of the physical body at many levels.

But what I am not saying, at all, is that there is some proscribed grouping of humanity that is bereft of spirituality, or even diminished in its access to it. Yet this is precisely what Mormonism asserts for the rest of the world. I don't have to know others' spiritual experiences to know that spirituality is the common gift of our duality; as natural to our sapience as thinking itself. Everyone is connected to "God", and that is a de facto spiritual connection....

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Your opinion (IMO, ha) is a good one and nothing to sneer at.

I just feel a little concerned that the feelings I had that proved to me the truthfulness of my church are the same feelings others receive on behalf of their churches and relationships with God.

I mean, God knows people's natures, right? He obviously knows that when he gave a Protestant man such powerful feelings of peace when his preacher was teaching a sermon that that man wouldn't give his true church the time of day.

Why would He do that?

Its quite possible that he has nothing to with it. Confirmation bias is just one reason we should suspect this to be the case.

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I have had MANY spiritual experiences. Many occurred when I was struggling to be a TBM. Many have occurred and continue to occur since my religious world view changed. In my "TBM" days, I ascribed spiritual experiences to being specifically "Mormon" related or caused: the Church's dogmatic assertion to exclusivity disallowed that ANY other persuasion, religious or otherwise, could experience what "we" do with the Gift of the Holy Ghost: only just enough to tell them that the Church and restored gospel are true, then, if they deny it, the HG withdraws and they fall into darkness, etc. ad nauseam.

Strawman. The Church makes no such assertion, dogmatic or otherwise.
I find, now, that spirituality is the shared gift of mankind.
That would be more in line with what the Church actually teaches. Yes we teach that the Gift of the Holy Ghost a superior state of things, but that does not mean no one else has any access to the Spirit.
But what I am not saying, at all, is that there is some proscribed grouping of humanity that is bereft of spirituality, or even diminished in its access to it. Yet this is precisely what Mormonism asserts for the rest of the world.
No it doesn't. Again, you are making a fine target to throw your arrows at, but it is made of straw.
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