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Nepotism


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Nepotism: to give favored positions to relatives and/or friends regardless of merit.In my several decades in the church it has not been my experience,Small branches have a much more difficult time avoiding accusations of nepotism because of a limited talent pool.The early days of the church had similar problems.If someone ever made the massive mistake of calling me to a leadership position ,I would naturally lean toward assistants who knew and understood me and whom I felt I could work with. New missions in the church often have only a few strong families to call on. In more established areas the talent/spiritual base is much deeper and broader so nepotism would not be a "big" issue.

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Do you think Nepotism plays a big part in who serves in which callings in your wards and stakes, and why.

Never seen it. I once saw a ward with a Bishop whose son was Young Men's president though how nepotism would apply, I can't really think of how. This criticism has been applied to the general authorities though. Perhaps someone could address that.

Nepotism: to give favored positions to relatives and/or friends regardless of merit

I can't imagine any position in the Church being "favored". Not even a General Authority position. Too much work for no money, no extra wives :P etc.

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Never seen it. I once saw a ward with a Bishop whose son was Young Men's president though how nepotism would apply, I can't really think of how. This criticism has been applied to the general authorities though. Perhaps someone could address that.

The reality is that callings are made to those who will accept them, and that tends to run in families, like any work ethic. It is part of the way you are raised.

I have never seen nepotism in the church, but I have seen families which are more active and committed than others, both at the ward level and "higher".

To be perfectly honest, I think that general authorities tend to be better at raising kids who are "general authority material" than others. If there appears to be nepotism at that level, I think that is the real reason it looks that way.

I have tried to raise my kids to be active members and accept callings, and they have received "important" callings. It's no mystery. This is a volunteer organization, and those who actually are willing to work will always get the more responsible positions in any such organization.

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In 1892 Kimball was called to be an LDS General Authority as a member of the First Council of Seventy, to which he observed:

"Some people say a person receives a position in this church through revelation, and others say they get it through inspiration, but I say they get it through relation. If I hadn't been related to Heber C. Kimball I wouldn't have been a damn thing in this church."

No one can deny that General Authorities have been related to each other at a far higher rate than would be expected from random chance. Whether this is a result of favored blood lines (certain lineages being favored for positions of authority), good upbringing (children from families of leaders grow up to be good leaders), nepotism (when faced with a pool of qualified candidates, leaders choose the one they're related to) or something else, I suspect we'll never know.

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In 1892 Kimball was called to be an LDS General Authority as a member of the First Council of Seventy, to which he observed:

"Some people say a person receives a position in this church through revelation, and others say they get it through inspiration, but I say they get it through relation. If I hadn't been related to Heber C. Kimball I wouldn't have been a damn thing in this church."

No one can deny that General Authorities have been related to each other at a far higher rate than would be expected from random chance. Whether this is a result of favored blood lines (certain lineages being favored for positions of authority), good upbringing (children from families of leaders grow up to be good leaders), nepotism (when faced with a pool of qualified candidates, leaders choose the one they're related to) or something else, I suspect we'll never know.

That is Elder Kimball's observation which may or may not be correct as to why he was called but he is also on record as saying the following in the April 1913,

"I am very proud of my parentage. I do not think any one appreciates their parentage more than I do. But, I want to say to the Latter-day Saints, pride in parentage won't save you. If we get salvation, we must keep the commandments, and serve the Lord. Knowledge pertaining to the gospel of Jesus Christ does not come through ordination, nor by appointment, nor by lineage, nor through father and mother, though they are helpful. But no matter who my father and mother were, or how devoted and faithful they have been; no matter how much work they have accomplished, and how much gospel they have preached to the children of men, I tell you if Heber C. Kimball's children are saved in the kingdom they must keep the commandments of God, or they won't be saved. If they don't accomplish it here, I am glad to know they will have another chance".

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In 1892 Kimball was called to be an LDS General Authority as a member of the First Council of Seventy, to which he observed:

"Some people say a person receives a position in this church through revelation, and others say they get it through inspiration, but I say they get it through relation. If I hadn't been related to Heber C. Kimball I wouldn't have been a damn thing in this church."

No one can deny that General Authorities have been related to each other at a far higher rate than would be expected from random chance. Whether this is a result of favored blood lines (certain lineages being favored for positions of authority), good upbringing (children from families of leaders grow up to be good leaders), nepotism (when faced with a pool of qualified candidates, leaders choose the one they're related to) or something else, I suspect we'll never know.

Considering we are all children of God, wouldn't we all technically be nepotic, as Nathair said? :P

On the lighter side, nah, my ward isn't nepotic.

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No.

Bernard

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Haven't seen it, if it exists.

What I have seen in our stake is that there are certain families who have produced extremely strong and stalwart Saints, and members of these families tend to be called to leadership positions, which callings they fulfill well. In one family I am well acquainted with, the paterfamilias is the current Patriarch, after having served many years on the High Council and as a bishop, and the regional physical facility manager, and two of his sons are presently in the High Council after years of service in bishoprics. They are all highly competent in their professions, and serious in their committment to the Church. Not a whiff of nepotism, especially since the calling authorities have not been members of this family. But talent will rise, that is a fact.

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I once saw a son who was serving as a councelor to his bishop father. However I wouldn't call that nepotism as both were very dedicated to Jesus Christ and serving him in any way they were asked.

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