Jump to content

If God doesn't want us to sin . . .


consiglieri

Recommended Posts

This subject came up toward the end of a lengthy thread currently ongoing, and I thought I would give it a thread of its own.

We are frequently told that God does not want us to sin. This seems reasonable enough.

On the other hand, God has created a world in which each and every one of us will sin. We can't help it. It is part of our makeup. The way God created us, I might add.

In fact, 1 John 1:10 (?) goes so far as to say if anybody say they don't sin, they are a liar and the truth is not in them.

Paul says all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23?)

So, if God really didn't want us to sin, why didn't he create a plan where we didn't have to?

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Link to comment

This subject came up toward the end of a lengthy thread currently ongoing, and I thought I would give it a thread of its own.

We are frequently told that God does not want us to sin. This seems reasonable enough.

On the other hand, God has created a world in which each and every one of us will sin. We can't help it. It is part of our makeup. The way God created us, I might add.

In fact, 1 John 1:10 (?) goes so far as to say if anybody say they don't sin, they are a liar and the truth is not in them.

Paul says all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23?)

So, if God really didn't want us to sin, why didn't he create a plan where we didn't have to?

We don't have to. The fact that we do doesn't mean that we have to.

Link to comment

Maybe he did, and there was only One who was willing and capable of stepping up to that plate.

I think mercyngrace (where is that girl, anyway?) hit it on the head with a quote she gave from the Book of Mormon, being that men cannot come to God except they repent.

If repentance is the only way to God, there must be something to repent of.

Hence the necessity of sin.

I think I am only scratching the surface of an enormous subject, but there you have it.

(Or I could be barking up the wrong tree altogether.)

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Link to comment

I think mercyngrace (where is that girl, anyway?) hit it on the head with a quote she gave from the Book of Mormon, being that men cannot come to God except they repent.

If repentance is the only way to God, there must be something to repent of.

Hence the necessity of sin.

I think I am only scratching the surface of an enormous subject, but there you have it.

(Or I could be barking up the wrong tree altogether.)

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Here I am (waves wildly!)

It's the right tree! I call it, the tree of life...

Link to comment

Jesus was not a human being.

Gods are not expected to sin, even during their mortal incarnations.

I await a better attempt on your part.

Or was that all you had?

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Jesus was God, but also man. He has set us an example that He expects us to follow.

Link to comment

Jesus was God, but also man. He has set us an example that He expects us to follow.

What was the example, Zerinus? Salvation by works? Perfection through the mastery of the law? Is that why He was exalted?

The scriptures teach something else...

Link to comment

I think mercyngrace (where is that girl, anyway?) hit it on the head with a quote she gave from the Book of Mormon, being that men cannot come to God except they repent.

If repentance is the only way to God, there must be something to repent of.

Hence the necessity of sin.

Oh, I think you and MnG have got the coon treed.

I was musing over the possibility that a path of sinless life was offered to all of us. But it carried an extremely heavy price tag. So heavy that all but one shrank at its prospect.

Link to comment

We could never know the joy of our salvation if we never sinned. Sin, as repugnant as it may be, is essential to the Plan of Happiness.

Not only could we never know the joy of our redemption (step one - leads to salvation) but we could never understand how to become saviors to each other (step two - exaltation).

Link to comment

Oh, I think you and MnG have got the coon treed.

I was musing over the possibility that a path of sinless life was offered to all of us. But it carried an extremely heavy price tag. So heavy that all but one shrank at its prospect.

But we have to fall, Senator, it is the knowledge that makes us like the Gods, knowing good from evil. And I'm not referring to the specifics of a particular sin but how falling leads us to understand redemption and exaltation!

Link to comment

I think mercyngrace (where is that girl, anyway?) hit it on the head with a quote she gave from the Book of Mormon, being that men cannot come to God except they repent.

If repentance is the only way to God, there must be something to repent of.

Hence the necessity of sin.

I think you have got that altogether wrong. It is not the necessity of sin, but the inevitability of sin. We sin because of the "fall of our nature," not because it is necessary for us to sin, or God wants us or expects us to sin.

Link to comment

This subject came up toward the end of a lengthy thread currently ongoing, and I thought I would give it a thread of its own.

We are frequently told that God does not want us to sin. This seems reasonable enough.

On the other hand, God has created a world in which each and every one of us will sin. We can't help it. It is part of our makeup. The way God created us, I might add.

In fact, 1 John 1:10 (?) goes so far as to say if anybody say they don't sin, they are a liar and the truth is not in them.

Paul says all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23?)

So, if God really didn't want us to sin, why didn't he create a plan where we didn't have to?

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Because as spirits, I do not think we had the right qualities to become as he was at that point. We needed lessons, trials. And lessons, trials mean that we have the possibility of sinning.

Link to comment

What was the example, Zerinus? Salvation by works? Perfection through the mastery of the law? Is that why He was exalted?

The example was: "Therefore, what manner of men ought ye to be? Verily I say unto you, even as I am" (3 Nephi 27:27).

Link to comment

That is an utterly false theology that it not found in the Book of Mormon.

Were it not for our transgression we never should have had seed, and never should have known good and evil, and the joy of our redemption... ~ Eve

...wherefore they would have remained in a state of innocence, having no joy, for they knew no misery; doing no good, for they knew no sin. ~ Lehi

Link to comment

That is an utterly false theology that it not found in the Book of Mormon.

Really?...

2 Nephi 2:23

And they would have had no children; wherefore they would have remained in a state of innocence, having no joy, for they knew no misery; doing no good, for they knew no sin.

Link to comment

The example was: "Therefore, what manner of men ought ye to be? Verily I say unto you, even as I am" (3 Nephi 27:27).

But why do you think he meant "sinless"?

Christ was much more important things than sinless.

And here we come to the issue of commandments.

We must be given a law we will break.

If we did not break it, we would have no sin.

If we had no sin, there would be no misery.

If there were no misery, there would be no happiness.

Wherefore all things must have been created for nothing.

This would destroy the wisdom of God.

(Or something like that.)

All the Best!

--Lehi

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...