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My New Friend Is In Jail


Blossom

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Actually she is more than a friend, she is my sister. She was the one who slapped me, then we got past it and I got to know her. Sister X went off her medications and apparently was found wandering about her neighborhood and broke into a house. Her guardian, her blood sister, (a Christian Scientist) won't bail her out of jail because she says she needs to "be taught a lesson."

I offered to pay the bail, but her guardian said no and when I went to to the jail, I was told that no one from the Church was allowed to see her or to help her in any way.

I wasn't trying to butt in, I wanted to see her and maybe tell her I love her.

Now I am dealing with two other issues -- anger and frustration. I spent a long time with the Bible (the right one -- the Joseph Smith Translation) tonight and in prayer with my patient, loving neighbor.

I am sorry and maybe I am terribly wrong, but our brothers and sisters who are mentally ill cannot be treated like misbehaving children. Since she went off her medications, she needs professional help, counseling, and encouragement to get back on her medications -- not jail.

Am I completely wrong?

Maybe I'm being horribly selfish, but she and I had an "event" planned for tomorrow. I am off work and we were going to visit a music store, I was going to take her to lunch (she loves Chinese) and then we were going to visit the library. I called her this afternoon to make sure she could still make it and confirm times, and that is when I found out.

I'm not allowed to see her or talk to her. I have gone to Father about it. Only my neighbor knows about it and has promised to tell no one in the Church because it might result in some embarrassment and we just didn't feel right about going to anyone. Please don't be angry with me for telling her. When I got back from trying to see Sister X, my neighbor had flower bulbs for me and met me in the driveway and I was in tears. But see, I can talk to her.

Sister X is all alone in a nasty jail cell. I don't even know if they are giving her the medications she needs. Her guardian is rather cold and thinks psychiatrists are quacks and she needs to be taught a lesson.

What else can I do? I've prayed, cried, prayed more, cried more, and I feel absolutely helpless. I even thought about calling our local chapter of NAMI (National Association for the Mentally Ill) and telling them of her plight. But I feel I would stir up a mess and the last thing she needs is a mess. I can't tell anyone else. Going over to her sister's house and trying to talk to her won't solve anything. That is one mean woman, believe me.

Sister X will be in jail until her court date on March 3rd. I can't even find out who her lawyer is. I'm sure it's a public defender but her details are unavailable. The only time you can get any information is through the court docket and when I pull up her name, it doesn't say who her lawyer is. I cannot call the public defenders' office and find out because that information is private -- the lawyer-client privacy thing. At least I found out her court date, and I will be there for her. Unless she's so long off her medication and doesn't recognize me...that bothers me. I just want to support her with love.

Any ideas?

Thanks for listening.

Blessings,

Blossom

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Actually she is more than a friend, she is my sister. She was the one who slapped me, then we got past it and I got to know her. Sister X went off her medications and apparently was found wandering about her neighborhood and broke into a house. Her guardian, her blood sister, (a Christian Scientist) won't bail her out of jail because she says she needs to "be taught a lesson."

I offered to pay the bail, but her guardian said no and when I went to to the jail, I was told that no one from the Church was allowed to see her or to help her in any way.

I wasn't trying to butt in, I wanted to see her and maybe tell her I love her.

Now I am dealing with two other issues -- anger and frustration. I spent a long time with the Bible (the right one -- the Joseph Smith Translation) tonight and in prayer with my patient, loving neighbor.

I am sorry and maybe I am terribly wrong, but our brothers and sisters who are mentally ill cannot be treated like misbehaving children. Since she went off her medications, she needs professional help, counseling, and encouragement to get back on her medications -- not jail.

Am I completely wrong?

Maybe I'm being horribly selfish, but she and I had an "event" planned for tomorrow. I am off work and we were going to visit a music store, I was going to take her to lunch (she loves Chinese) and then we were going to visit the library. I called her this afternoon to make sure she could still make it and confirm times, and that is when I found out.

I'm not allowed to see her or talk to her. I have gone to Father about it. Only my neighbor knows about it and has promised to tell no one in the Church because it might result in some embarrassment and we just didn't feel right about going to anyone. Please don't be angry with me for telling her. When I got back from trying to see Sister X, my neighbor had flower bulbs for me and met me in the driveway and I was in tears. But see, I can talk to her.

Sister X is all alone in a nasty jail cell. I don't even know if they are giving her the medications she needs. Her guardian is rather cold and thinks psychiatrists are quacks and she needs to be taught a lesson.

What else can I do? I've prayed, cried, prayed more, cried more, and I feel absolutely helpless. I even thought about calling our local chapter of NAMI (National Association for the Mentally Ill) and telling them of her plight. But I feel I would stir up a mess and the last thing she needs is a mess. I can't tell anyone else. Going over to her sister's house and trying to talk to her won't solve anything. That is one mean woman, believe me.

Sister X will be in jail until her court date on March 3rd. I can't even find out who her lawyer is. I'm sure it's a public defender but her details are unavailable. The only time you can get any information is through the court docket and when I pull up her name, it doesn't say who her lawyer is. I cannot call the public defenders' office and find out because that information is private -- the lawyer-client privacy thing. At least I found out her court date, and I will be there for her. Unless she's so long off her medication and doesn't recognize me...that bothers me. I just want to support her with love.

Any ideas?

Thanks for listening.

Blessings,

Blossom

I am not an attorney, but I have worked with inmates for a long time and I am little surprised by this story. First of all, she would probably have to been given a psychiatric screening despite her distrust of mental health officials. If she is mentally troubled she doesn't belong in a jail cell. The fact they won't let you visit her is quizzical as well. Unless she is being refused any and all visitations (unusual) then you should have access. I would think you should have the bishop visit her. Usually, they have more power to open up such doors. Barring that then there should be a LDS chaplain that could visit her. As to her medications they will be given to her through the medical facilities. Finally, information about her should not be subject to any kind of privacy since the information is or should be in the public domain. I am not certain of the laws in your state so this could be different in yours. Maybe some of the lawyers here can give you more specific info. Good luck and I hope all turns out well.

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I don't think your friend's guardian can dictate to the jail who can visit her sister unless there is a restraining order against you (which I doubt they would issue anyway.) However, if you bail her out, they will just release her to the custody of her guardian who won't let you see her anyway. I think the only thing you can do for her at this point is pray for her and put it in the hands of God.

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I don't think your friend's guardian can dictate to the jail who can visit her sister unless there is a restraining order against you (which I doubt they would issue anyway.) However, if you bail her out, they will just release her to the custody of her guardian who won't let you see her anyway. I think the only thing you can do for her at this point is pray for her and put it in the hands of God.

You have to be on a list in most "jails"...sadly I have brother who once forgot to put me on his. But on that day i was not allowed to see him.

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Are you saying that this person has a guardian (which would be unlikely apparently if she is allowed to attend church)? Or is the sister simply her nearest relative, and perhaps her SSI payee? If I were in your place, I would write to the public defender's office. I would put re: her name, date of birth, the court case no if you know it, introduce myself, describe how you know her and about your meetup that she missed, offer to pay the bail (assuming you have money that you can afford to give as a gift, and have felt inspired by teh spirit to use that way). Tell them what you factually know about the sister's interaction with the woman. I would tell what you were told at the jail about not being allowed to visit because of your supposed faith (and that you are afraid for her mental health if she is not visited by anyone, and I would tell the public defender that I would like to help and my contact information. Then I would send it in a manner that I could prove the PD's office got it. Then at least they can contact you if they choose to do so, and they will know what you know about her and can better represent her.

Then I would write the sheriff who runs the jail and whomever the jail commander is (call and get the names) and advise him/her that you went to visit X and was told that because of the church which they believe (at the moment erroneously) you belong to, you cannot visit X. Tell them you think that is a violation of the Constitution, and since it is your understanding that the arrested person does belong to that faith, also a probable violation of her right to free exercise of her religion. Ask them nicely to reconsider, since you were to meet the woman for lunch the day she was arrested and your visits might mean that her current incarceration causes less harm to her mental health. Also tell them in this letter that the woman has told you she has mental health issues for which she takes -------------(tell them what you know specifically), and you are worried she will not get that required medication while she is in jail. (If this is true, add that she has told you that her Christian Scientist sister doesn't believe in medication and doesn't support her use of it.) Ask them to change their minds and let you visit. Tell them you will be dropping off a set of scriptures to her at the front desk of the jail (if you want to) (you might call the jail and without saying who you are ask them how to get religious books to inmates, some jails make you mail them from the publisher, which could take a while from church distribution). Send this letter in a way you can track its arrival.

Neither of these letters might make any difference. But try again to visit her at the jail. Get the names of anyone who turns you away. And then you can show up at court. It is possible she will be given her medication especially after you write and tell them about it. But if they don't and she wants to pursue this when she gets out, your letters will help her do that.

Send copies of each letter to her at the jail, being careful to follow the jail procedure for letter writing exactly. (Plain paper, envelope with the stamped by the PO, not the kind you stick on, no more than 3 pages in each letter, her name and inmate number (which you can get from the jail) on the front, correct address, etc. Jails often have a page that tells you their rules.) Then she will know that you are thinking of her. And because she has never been there, tell her she can probably ask for and get letter writing paper, envelope and stamps --- many jails do this for indigent inmates. (And they lawfully cannot refuse to give her your letters (unless they violate the rules or there is a court order to that effect or maybe if your letters make her hysterical, which isn't likely. It is the US Mail and they cannot interfere with it except to open and make sure it doesn't contain contraband. But if they do send them back, you'll have additional evidence that may help her eventually if she decides to fight.

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I don't think your friend's guardian can dictate to the jail who can visit her sister unless there is a restraining order against you (which I doubt they would issue anyway.) However, if you bail her out, they will just release her to the custody of her guardian who won't let you see her anyway. I think the only thing you can do for her at this point is pray for her and put it in the hands of God.

If the sister is her legal guardian she has every right to refuse to allow her dependent visitors. So if the sister has been given legal guardianship over the lady than yes she can tell the jail to not allow visitors. If this is the case though, the sister would be in trouble as well since she allowed the lady to wander around unattended. Also the jail could of also refuse to allow visitors for any reason they want as well, visitation is a privilege not a right, the only person that has a right to visit a prisoner is there attorney.

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I am sorry and maybe I am terribly wrong, but our brothers and sisters who are mentally ill cannot be treated like misbehaving children. Since she went off her medications, she needs professional help, counseling, and encouragement to get back on her medications -- not jail.

Am I completely wrong?

If she broke into someone's house that is a felony, it is a very serious crime, and only a judge and jury can determine is she is competent. The Law Enforcement is doing there job and placed her under arrest for committing a serious crime (a felony) she and her attorney will have there day in court and the justice system will handing the matter. To assume automatically that mental illness makes someone able to commit a serious felony and not have to face a judge is wrong in my opinion. If she is incompetent the judge and/or jury will decide that, it is the job of law enforcement to arrest people who commit crimes and hand them over to the judicial system to figure out what to do. It isn't perfect but it is the best thing we got, if it was something simple or a misdemeanor, I could see the police letting things go but this is a serious felony, breaking and entering can have a sentence of up to 10 years in most states. This is not a simple thing, if she understood what she was doing, (which is the courts job to decide) then she needs to face trail for her misconduct.

What else can I do?

Stay informed of the situation as best as you can, visit her if and when you are allowed to, get your ward involved, and find out who the prosecutor and public defender assigned to the case are. Keep praying also!

Sister X will be in jail until her court date on March 3rd. I can't even find out who her lawyer is. I'm sure it's a public defender but her details are unavailable. The only time you can get any information is through the court docket and when I pull up her name, it doesn't say who her lawyer is. I cannot call the public defenders' office and find out because that information is private -- the lawyer-client privacy thing. At least I found out her court date, and I will be there for her. Unless she's so long off her medication and doesn't recognize me...that bothers me. I just want to support her with love.

If she has prescriptions the jail will provide her with her medications, she will have to take them regardless, if there is a prescription she needs to be taking it is important that the medicine and prescription are taken to the jail she is being detained at. Also I don't know where you are but your story seems a little fishy. No one is held for longer than 72 hours without an arraignment, so she has had to of already of seen a judge and been given a trail date if the date is in March, that seems a little quick but it is possible to have that early a trial date (that really hurts her defense though). I don't know the whole story though, can you please provide more information, your details are not adding up if this case in the western world.

Any ideas?

Give more info, pray, and allow the justice system to do it's job. Believe me the justice system in the United States is the fairest justice system in the world. She has committed a crime so it isn't a crazy idea that she is being detained to be arraigned or tried. If you break the law you have to be held responsible, unless you are deemed incompetent to stand trial or are judges as Not Guilty by means of Insanity. No one can commit a serious felony like B&E and not expect to face a trial for there actions regardless of any circumstances.

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Then I would write the sheriff who runs the jail and whomever the jail commander is (call and get the names) and advise him/her that you went to visit X and was told that because of the church which they believe (at the moment erroneously) you belong to, you cannot visit X. Tell them you think that is a violation of the Constitution, and since it is your understanding that the arrested person does belong to that faith, also a probable violation of her right to free exercise of her religion.

Where in the 1st Amendment does it say that prison visits are covered?

Denying someone visits to a prisoner is not illegal, you could argue that basing the decision on faith is potentially discrimination (but that is a long shot at best, and no lawyer would take that lawsuit without a huge retainer) but the first amendment does not cover prison visits. A prision visit is an earned privileged with the exception of attorney/client visits, the only person guaranteed a prison visit is that there attorney.

My advice don't try and make more problems, you don't have a constitutional case here, and making a fuss will only make it harder to get access to this person. Patience and staying cool headed is the best thing to do right now! Trying to get into a fight over this is a bad idea, I don't personally see any ground for anything close to a constitutional violation here, and trying that route will only make the jail and the DA work against you more than they already are.

Looking at your profile I see your from NC, take it from me don't try and get into a Constitution debate with a county jail in western NC, they won't care at all.

Edited by LDS Guy 1986
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If the sister is her legal guardian she has every right to refuse to allow her dependent visitors. So if the sister has been given legal guardianship over the lady than yes she can tell the jail to not allow visitors. If this is the case though, the sister would be in trouble as well since she allowed the lady to wander around unattended. Also the jail could of also refuse to allow visitors for any reason they want as well, visitation is a privilege not a right, the only person that has a right to visit a prisoner is there attorney.

Are you in law enforcement? I am not, but I was always under the impression that once a person is arrested and taken in to custody they become a ward of that authority and not their parents or guardian. Otherwise, I could tell the police that I want my child released and returned to my home immediately and they would have to obey me. Doesn't that jurisdiction make those decisions instead of the guardian?

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Maybe her sister wants her to understand how important it is for her to take her medication? She may be mentally ill and that's sad, but mentally ill people can hurt people whether they intend to or not. People have the right to be protected.

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Blossom, write a letter to her and tell them the jailers/parental guardian they are required to give it to her according to US law.

According to findlaw.com...

Inmates retain only those First Amendment rights, such as freedom of speech, which are not inconsistent with their status as inmates and which are in keeping with the legitimate objectives of the penal corrections system, such as preservation of order, discipline, and security. In this regard, prison officials are entitled to open mail directed to inmates to ensure that it does not contain any illegal items or weapons, but may not censor portions of correspondence which they find merely inflammatory or rude. Note : Inmates do not have a right to have face-to-face interviews with news reporters or media representatives. The rationale for this limitation is that the media are not entitled to have access to inmates that members of the general public would not be able to have.

In addition, you also have a right to telephone call her

From answers.com...

The law has long recognized the importance of visitation rights, because such rights aid the prisoner's eventual transition back into the community by keeping the individual in touch with society.

Prisoners do not have a constitutional right to enjoy contact visits, as opposed to arrangements where prisoners are only permitted to talk to visitors over a telephone (Block v. Rutherford, 468 U.S. 576, 104 S. Ct. 3227, 82 L. Ed. 2d 438 [1984]). Courts have held that restrictions on visitation must be reasonable and related only to security needs and good order. Prisoners do not have a right to engage in sexual relations with a visitor.

The issue of the right of a prisoner to communicate and see visitors becomes more significant when the proposed visitor is a news reporter. Federal courts have held that a genuine need for security must be given greater weight than access to the media. Although inmates have a First Amendment right to communicate with the media, this right can be satisfied through the mail.

Before an individual interview with a reporter is approved, prison officials can require the prisoner or reporter to complete an application that discloses the names of the persons involved and the nature of the intended discussions. Officials can also limit reporters to random interviews conducted during a tour of the prison, as opposed to prearranged interviews with specific prisoners. In addition, face-to-face interviews can be banned for any prisoner who has been placed in maximum security.

Read more: http://www.answers.c...s#ixzz1EHH5Pzt3

Furthermore, a prisoner also must be allowed to contact with religious leaders of their choice, also from answers.com

A prisoner must be allowed to practice her religion, obtain and keep written religious materials, see or communicate with a religious leader, and obey the rules of her religion that do not endanger order and security in the prison. In addition, wherever possible, formal religious observances for groups of inmates must be allowed on a regular basis. Prisoners can have access to religious programs broadcast on radio and television. Different religions within a particular prison must be given equal treatment.

Until 1997, when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned portions of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (42 U.S.C.A.

Edited by TAO
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Are you saying that this person has a guardian (which would be unlikely apparently if she is allowed to attend church)? Or is the sister simply her nearest relative, and perhaps her SSI payee? If I were in your place, I would write to the public defender's office. I would put re: her name, date of birth, the court case no if you know it, introduce myself, describe how you know her and about your meetup that she missed, offer to pay the bail (assuming you have money that you can afford to give as a gift, and have felt inspired by teh spirit to use that way). Tell them what you factually know about the sister's interaction with the woman. I would tell what you were told at the jail about not being allowed to visit because of your supposed faith (and that you are afraid for her mental health if she is not visited by anyone, and I would tell the public defender that I would like to help and my contact information. Then I would send it in a manner that I could prove the PD's office got it. Then at least they can contact you if they choose to do so, and they will know what you know about her and can better represent her.

Then I would write the sheriff who runs the jail and whomever the jail commander is (call and get the names) and advise him/her that you went to visit X and was told that because of the church which they believe (at the moment erroneously) you belong to, you cannot visit X. Tell them you think that is a violation of the Constitution, and since it is your understanding that the arrested person does belong to that faith, also a probable violation of her right to free exercise of her religion. Ask them nicely to reconsider, since you were to meet the woman for lunch the day she was arrested and your visits might mean that her current incarceration causes less harm to her mental health. Also tell them in this letter that the woman has told you she has mental health issues for which she takes -------------(tell them what you know specifically), and you are worried she will not get that required medication while she is in jail. (If this is true, add that she has told you that her Christian Scientist sister doesn't believe in medication and doesn't support her use of it.) Ask them to change their minds and let you visit. Tell them you will be dropping off a set of scriptures to her at the front desk of the jail (if you want to) (you might call the jail and without saying who you are ask them how to get religious books to inmates, some jails make you mail them from the publisher, which could take a while from church distribution). Send this letter in a way you can track its arrival.

Neither of these letters might make any difference. But try again to visit her at the jail. Get the names of anyone who turns you away. And then you can show up at court. It is possible she will be given her medication especially after you write and tell them about it. But if they don't and she wants to pursue this when she gets out, your letters will help her do that.

Send copies of each letter to her at the jail, being careful to follow the jail procedure for letter writing exactly. (Plain paper, envelope with the stamped by the PO, not the kind you stick on, no more than 3 pages in each letter, her name and inmate number (which you can get from the jail) on the front, correct address, etc. Jails often have a page that tells you their rules.) Then she will know that you are thinking of her. And because she has never been there, tell her she can probably ask for and get letter writing paper, envelope and stamps --- many jails do this for indigent inmates. (And they lawfully cannot refuse to give her your letters (unless they violate the rules or there is a court order to that effect or maybe if your letters make her hysterical, which isn't likely. It is the US Mail and they cannot interfere with it except to open and make sure it doesn't contain contraband. But if they do send them back, you'll have additional evidence that may help her eventually if she decides to fight.

I will try to do that! Maybe that might work!

Blessings,

Blossom

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Oh my! Such a wealth of help! Yes, I will try anything I can and thank you ALL!

I copied these wonderful messages to a Word document and yes, I will try all your suggestions and help!

Now it's so obvious why I love this Church. Look at yourselves. All of you. Nuff said.

Maybe I can do something here.

I love you folks.

Blessings,

Blossom

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Where in the 1st Amendment does it say that prison visits are covered?

Denying someone visits to a prisoner is not illegal, you could argue that basing the decision on faith is potentially discrimination (but that is a long shot at best, and no lawyer would take that lawsuit without a huge retainer) but the first amendment does not cover prison visits. A prision visit is an earned privileged with the exception of attorney/client visits, the only person guaranteed a prison visit is that there attorney.

My advice don't try and make more problems, you don't have a constitutional case here, and making a fuss will only make it harder to get access to this person. Patience and staying cool headed is the best thing to do right now! Trying to get into a fight over this is a bad idea, I don't personally see any ground for anything close to a constitutional violation here, and trying that route will only make the jail and the DA work against you more than they already are.

Looking at your profile I see your from NC, take it from me don't try and get into a Constitution debate with a county jail in western NC, they won't care at all.

Now you know what I am dealing with. NC laws are....well, just NC laws.

Blessings,

Blossom

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The reason that you give notice of constitutional violations in writing is so they have a chance to correct the problem if they take it, AND so you can prove they continued knowingly at some later time. NOT that you think it will magically change anything.

It is unconstitutional for the jail to determine visitation based on the faith or supposed faith of the person seeking to visit. "You can't visit because you're a mormon.") They can refuse on other grounds, but not on that one.

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I offered to pay the bail, but her guardian said no and when I went to to the jail, I was told that no one from the Church was allowed to see her or to help her in any way.

That doesn't make sense. Though NC may be different, usually anyone with the cash can walk in and post bail. The jail doesn't care who it comes from. But if your friend is mentally ill I would advise against posting bail. The mentally ill are notoriously unreliable about showing up when they are supposed to. There is a 95% chance she will not make all her court appearances and you will end up forfeiting your money.

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I don't think your friend's guardian can dictate to the jail who can visit her sister unless there is a restraining order against you (which I doubt they would issue anyway.) However, if you bail her out, they will just release her to the custody of her guardian who won't let you see her anyway. I think the only thing you can do for her at this point is pray for her and put it in the hands of God.

I am not lawyer, so I cannot speak to whether or not you can be blocked of visitation -- but I couldn't agree more, best thing is to pray and to look to the scripture for answers and support.

Getting an elder involved might be a good step as well.

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That doesn't make sense. Though NC may be different, usually anyone with the cash can walk in and post bail. The jail doesn't care who it comes from. But if your friend is mentally ill I would advise against posting bail. The mentally ill are notoriously unreliable about showing up when they are supposed to. There is a 95% chance she will not make all her court appearances and you will end up forfeiting your money.

We cannot determine such things. The 95% comment seems out of place.

Look to God for guidance and pray that she can turn around her bad ways!

I hope your love can get through to her guardian as well~!!

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I spent a long time with the Bible (the right one -- the Joseph Smith Translation)

I'm curious, are you RLDS or COC?

Cause, this is not something ANY mormon I've ever known would say....

It's a backhanded disrespectful slam against the Bible as well as the rest of Christianity.

And since LDS fully embrace the Bible, including the non-JST parts, this is simply so wrong on so many levels.

So, I'm curious the reason for such a comment?

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I'm curious, are you RLDS or COC?

Cause, this is not something ANY mormon I've ever known would say....

It's a backhanded disrespectful slam against the Bible as well as the rest of Christianity.

And since LDS fully embrace the Bible, including the non-JST parts, this is simply so wrong on so many levels.

So, I'm curious the reason for such a comment?

:P Obi... she's regular LDS... and the JST IS more enlightening than the regular bible much of the time =P.

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Cause, this is not something ANY mormon I've ever known would say....

This is Social Hall, in here you are supposed to give people the benefit of the doubt, not make negative assumptions.

Blossom is new to the community---both board and LDS, investigating for about a year now IIRC, looking forward to baptism last time she posted, again IIRC, it is not surprising that she says things in unexpected ways; that comment doesn't have to be a slam, it just could mean that she's trying to be on the same page as the rest of LDS who she assumes are most likely reading that version as well (and we do have the significant parts in our LDS editions which we are encouraged to study from so it's the 'right' one for us as well in one sense).

Where is Blossom, BTW, it's been several days since she's posted. Hope everything is ok.

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Nothing wrong with encoraging [sic]minor correction is there? I explained what was wrong with the statement, that there is a better way.

If that is what you meant to do, I'd suggest you have left out the statement that she must be of another faith if that is how she talks. (BTW, I don't think that is how those faiths would describe it either.)

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Update.

My friend passed last night while in jail. February 27, 2011. She was only 64 years old.

I am beyond help and haven't slept much.

Thank you all for your help and support. I do so appreciate you all. Her guardian called me asking for money to cremate her. That is how I found out.

I am just not in a mood to talk but wanted to let you all know.

Yes, I'll pay for the cremation.

Blessings,

Blossom

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