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Are Jorden and Saudi Arabia Next?


inquiringmind

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Any thoughts on what happened in Egypt?

Are Jorden and Saudi Arabia next?

How long till Iran gets the bomb?

What happens to Israel (and could the demise of Israel be part of the NWO agenda?)

Also, what (if any) role do Mormons see the EU playing in end time events?

Watch out I posted a similar thread and it got shut down as being politics!

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Any thoughts on what happened in Egypt?

I think Egypt and all the turmoil in the Middle East is the conequence of the rise of a free and democratic nation in the Middle East. When Iran, Syria, and Jordan, failed to make Iraq tear itself apart, these dictators knew there days were numbered. In my opinon these protests and uprisings will continue untill the people of the middle east finally cast off the tyranny they have been oppressed by for too long.

Are Jorden and Saudi Arabia next?

Yes and Yes, Jordan will be next to topple I believe, Saudi will take much longer but I believe it the Kingdom will either become a constitutional monarchy like England where the King is nothing more than a figurehead, or will crumble and democracy will replace it.

How long till Iran gets the bomb?

If they don't already have an atomic bomb (they have plenty of materials to make one) they will have one soon.

What happens to Israel (and could the demise of Israel be part of the NWO agenda?)

Nothing happens to Israel, democracy in the Arab world helps Israel in my opinion. Arab Democracies more stable and less likely to want to go to war with Israel. In the end even if they decide to war with Israel they are doomed to failure just like in the Six Days War, and the dozen or so mini wars since.

Also, what (if any) role do Mormons see the EU playing in end time events?

Mormons don't have any opinions in the EU and if they will play any role in the end times, personally I fail to see that they will have any impact since the EU is about a year and a half away from dissolving if they continue there fiscal irresponsibility.

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Democracy is the rule of the people (for better or worse), and I'm not sure we understand the Muslim people.

Those who are only culturally Moslem, and influenced by western ideals of equality and pluralism may be a minority.

The ones I've known (and worked with) were highly ethical and moral in most things, but they truly hated Jews.

They liked me bacause they knew I was a proffesing Christian, and because I (at the time) tried to keep kosher, but they wanted to convert me because they believed that there would be a war between Christians, Jews, and Muslims, and all non Muslims would have to die.

They even told me that the reason the Jews plant a certain tree in Israel is because all the other trees will all answer them when they're asked (at the time of this final war) if there are any Jews hiding behind them.

Prior to 911, when they heard of suicide bombers in Israel, they refered to them as martyrs, and said "peace be upon them."

The scary thing is that these were not wild eyed fanatics.

They were hard working people who seemed perfectly normal (and very nice) when you weren't talking about politics or religion.

My point is that if the voting majority in Egypt, Jorden, and Saudi Arabia have similar views, Israel already has the bomb, Iran developes nuclear weponry, and others perhaps follow, democracy in the region could spell disaster.

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I posted that before I was fnished editing it (but I'm not really sure whether "Muslim" or "Moslem" is the correct spelling, so I guess it doesn't matter.)

Is there any way to edit a post after you've posted it here?

There is an edit button at the bottom of each post, but it's possible that you need to get past the Newbie stage before you can use/see it.

AFAIK both Muslim and Moslem are correct spellings. My spell checker seems to concur.

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Nothing happens to Israel, democracy in the Arab world helps Israel in my opinion. Arab Democracies more stable and less likely to want to go to war with Israel. In the end even if they decide to war with Israel they are doomed to failure just like in the Six Days War, and the dozen or so mini wars since.

Democracy in the Arab world would be wonderful, however this is not what happened in Egypt. My only hope now is that the army stays in power and acts pretty much like Mubarak did. The closest thing to a democracy in the Middle East (not including Israel which is more or less one) is Turkey. Since Erdogan has been in office, relations with Israel have worsened.

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One hopes that this continues to be the case in a year or two.

The story of our Coptic cousins under Islam is very long, very sad, and, at present, precariously close to over.

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It is WAAAY too early to tell what type of governance will take hold in Egypt. Much like after the US revolution. Yes, the war was over, but we were years away from writing a constitution.

I don't see Sharia Law as having much effect in Egypt. There is a whole generation of young well educated Egyptians who want/ and will have a great deal to say on what the government becomes.

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I don't see Sharia Law as having much effect in Egypt. There is a whole generation of young well educated Egyptians who want/ and will have a great deal to say on what the government becomes.

The problem is that sharia is much in vogue with the younger, educated set.

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I think Egypt and all the turmoil in the Middle East is the conequence of the rise of a free and democratic nation in the Middle East. When Iran, Syria, and Jordan, failed to make Iraq tear itself apart, these dictators knew there days were numbered. In my opinon these protests and uprisings will continue untill the people of the middle east finally cast off the tyranny they have been oppressed by for too long.

I think it's extremely unlikely that Iraq is serving as a beacon of democracy in the region. Perhaps if they had accomplished it by rising up and toppling Saddam themselves, but Iraq's new government was the result of foreign invasion, and it is perceived as still being propped up by the US.

Any oppressed population will rise up and try to overthrow their oppressors if there is a committed core of fearless, influential rebels they can follow, and these efforts were made possible by communications technology. But the most crucial component of the success in Egypt is the fact that the military chose not to suppress the protests by force, without which it would have been short lived, as in Iran and China.

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It is WAAAY too early to tell what type of governance will take hold in Egypt. Much like after the US revolution. Yes, the war was over, but we were years away from writing a constitution.

I don't see Sharia Law as having much effect in Egypt. There is a whole generation of young well educated Egyptians who want/ and will have a great deal to say on what the government becomes.

Not really.

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But the most crucial component of the success in Egypt is the fact that the military chose not to suppress the protests by force, without which it would have been short lived, as in Iran and China.

You obviously don't remember Tienanmen Square, students stood down tanks and won, many people died but ultimately China developed a Constitution that started to grant citizens rights. The military suppressing or not suppressing the protests would of had little effect if the people truly wanted changes, there is only so many tanks and bullets. No nation can stop a mass up rising or mass protest, with any real success.

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It is WAAAY too early to tell what type of governance will take hold in Egypt. Much like after the US revolution. Yes, the war was over, but we were years away from writing a constitution.

It's never too early to see emerging patterns and make educated guesses at the outcome.

I don't see Sharia Law as having much effect in Egypt. There is a whole generation of young well educated Egyptians who want/ and will have a great deal to say on what the government becomes.

Yeah, have you spent any time at all in the Middle East ever? I am thinking you haven't because Sharia is popular among all Sunni Muslims regardless of age. Shia Islam does not accept most of the brutal aspects of Sharia Law, but they do accept parts of it.

Egypt is one the leaders of "mercy killings" in the Middle East, even when the practice was illegal under Egyptian Law. If the Islamic Brotherhood takes control then Sharia is coming to Egypt and it is going to get ugly fast! As long as a non radical government takes hold Egypt should be ok as far as Sharia being implimented. The mercy killings will never stop though, Sunni Islam will follow Sharia Law whether it is legal to or not.

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LDS Guy 1986:

I don't spend a lot of time in Washington DC. But that doesn't mean I don't know what's going on there.

I don't see Sharia Law for Egypt in the future.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-02-16/egypt-women-clash-on-sharia-after-equality-on-tahrir.html

While the Islamic Brotherhood bears monitoring it played no roll in the Revolution just held.

http://www.yalibnan.com/2011/02/07/muslim-brotherhood-the-young-people-led-the-egyptian-revolution/

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You obviously don't remember Tienanmen Square, students stood down tanks and won, many people died but ultimately China developed a Constitution that started to grant citizens rights. The military suppressing or not suppressing the protests would of had little effect if the people truly wanted changes, there is only so many tanks and bullets. No nation can stop a mass up rising or mass protest, with any real success.

You obviously haven't heard of Novocherkassk 1962. Workers stood up to tanks. The workers lost.

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