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Shelf Reliance Food Storage


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My wife and I are looking at where we are going to put our food storage (now that we are living in a house and have room to build a good solid food storage). We have decided to put it out in the garage and are looking for information concerning the Thrive brand of Shelf Reliance. Anyone use them for their food storage? Or, do you have suggestions on who to go through for food storage ordering? This includes shelving unit, et al.

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I had no idea this existed. Our food storage is in our garage, in enclosed cabinets my husband built lining two walls. I am retired Army, so we do have some MREs, and the other is mostly canned stuff and non-perishables. I'm not told much about food storage but I know we are supposed to have a year's supply, at least.

These cabinets are 18 inches deep, and go from floor to ceiling behind sliding wood doors. It was cheap to build out of plywood and piece paneling, and although at the time he was not yet studying, he saw the merit in food storage.

Blessings,

Blossom

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I haven't used this brand for the food. If you are looking for the rotation style shelving, at least here in Utah Walmart has it. It's expensive though, it is nice to be able to custom fit your smaller cans which the much cheaper 'beverage' dispensers of white wire design with only one or maybe two sizes do not. Would not use the rotation for the large cans as you don't go through them fast enough in my experience and the shelf takes up so much room. Better to simply write in permanent marker date of purchase and then give it a sequential id number so you can tell which one is 'next in line'.

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There was a thread awhile back on the best kind of 'canned' dairy products, I remember someone saying that the Moo Moo milk available at Walmart was excellent, I can't remember the recommendation for canned cheese or butter though...darn.

I'd like know the best dehydrated egg brand.

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Their food storage racks are excellent. Their freeze dried foods last the longest, but are kinda pricey. So I watch for the "Specials" at the grocery stores. Regular canned Spam lasts indefinitely if kept in a dry cool place. Watch for bulges in your other canned goods. Live by the motto "If in doubt, throw it out."

5 gallon food grade plastic storage buckets are easy to lift and carry, are best for grains, and dried legumes. Keep dried pasta away from bugs and vermin and they last almost indefinitely. Our Bishops Store House provides a canning machine. Find out if you have one in your area. They are a good resource for other ideas on how to do food storage.

Edited by thesometimesaint
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Another valuable substance for food storage is honey. Edible honey has even been found in ancient Egyptian tombs.It has antibacterial properties and can be used to preserve other foods. It can be even used on wounds, diabetic ulcers, etc. to treat and prevent infection.

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I mentioned this in another thread...

The book Food Storage for the Clueless is the best book I've seen on the topic for help with planning and purchasing so one doesn't end up with unused food or having one's food storage passed on to someone else along with the rest of the inheritance (like a never actually tasted fruitcake in the holidays). It may be out of print (was last time I checked) but you can find it on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Food-Storage-Clueless-Clark-Kidd/dp/157008680X

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My wife and I are looking at where we are going to put our food storage (now that we are living in a house and have room to build a good solid food storage). We have decided to put it out in the garage and are looking for information concerning the Thrive brand of Shelf Reliance. Anyone use them for their food storage? Or, do you have suggestions on who to go through for food storage ordering? This includes shelving unit, et al.

We have a couple of the units in our basement. Very handy. The kids enjoy going down to bring a can up for dinner and watching the cans roll.

They're all right. They get the canned stuff up off the floor. Maybe I should have built something myself, but I'm not that handy.

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We have a couple of the units in our basement. Very handy. The kids enjoy going down to bring a can up for dinner and watching the cans roll.

They're all right. They get the canned stuff up off the floor. Maybe I should have built something myself, but I'm not that handy.

How handy they are depends a great deal on if you have the room or not to be flexible in their placement if you need to be as your collection of 'stuff' grows. Also the cost...there is a lot of food storage that can be bought for the bigger metal units it seems to me and that regulates it to the basement, which in my family's case means it won't be used except in emergency (out of sight, out of mind). I spent a couple of hundred on their smaller units to adapt my current pantry shelves, this works great because it keeps the cans neat but still in sight.

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My advice is to spend some time figuring out the normal foods you eat for six months and the best times and prices to buy them at. Only once you know WHAT you are going to buy and how often you will need to rotate (the size of the containers) should you then determine how to economically store them. Sure for the remaining six months supply of wheat, dried beans, and honey and salt and oil (and if you are smart, herbs and spices), they can be in the traditional storage containers. But the first six months of regular things you eat and use is the most important part ot have. (I put a 48 case of disposable toothbrushes in food storage a couple of days ago for $9.00.)

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I have a lot to learn, reading all this. Our food storage is really primitive, I think.

Always a lot to think about here! Thanks!

Blessings,

Blossom

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Blossom:

Start out easy. Every time you go to the grocery store just pick up a few extra cans of veggies that your family eats anyway. As you get better at it and resources allow then expand.

If you do this when they are on sale and build up enough stock, you can end up saving more money than you would putting that money in a savings account so it can be worth the effort for a variety of reasons.

As someone else stated, you should have about 6 months worth of this type of food on hand (emergencies are not the time to change your style of eating, you want familiar, comforting foods during those time periods the most) and then add on 6 months worth of basic staples such as flours, salt, sugar, beans, dried fruits and vegetables, oils, dehydrated eggs, etc. that you can use to make sustaining food from scratch. Spices are great as well, if you buy in bulk which makes them very cheap, make sure to take out about 3-6 months of spices at a time and then vacuum seal if possible the remainder (at least don't keep reopening the package) and keep it in the dark and possibly in the freezer depending on the spice. Spices really add a lot of flavour and thus enjoyment to basic foods while not taking up significant space on the shelf, but if they've lost their flavour due to incorrect storage you may end up losing money by tossing the bulk of the bulk purchase away.

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calmoriah:

Also buy whole spices when ever possible. IE; Whole pepper corns last for years in a cool dry place. Ground pepper isn't worth the money it takes to buy it. If you have the room plant an herb garden. They don't take up much space, and are better tasting than anything you can get dried in a can.

Whole spices taste so much better than ground and fresh better than dried. I was so mad at myself when I let my first ever portable herb garden die last year do to forgetting to water it a few days in the worst heat. Next year it will be on the front porch, not the back, where it is protected from the worst of the sun. Might take longer to grow, but at the end of summer all I will have to do is pick them up and put them in my south facing windows and have nice herbs all year round.

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  • 1 month later...

for any of you paranoid about the japan nuclear fallout, do not use pure encapulations iodide tablets. the tablets are only 225mcg(micrograms), daily dosage protection from nuclear exposure 130mg(milligrams) you would have to take 577 pure encapulations tablets daily. As of yet no one in the US needs to take any potassium iodide for nuclear exposure from Japan.

since I know the daily dosage and so forth i am one of the paranoid, walmart, cvs, rei, walgreens, target do not sale these potassium iodide tablets.

Edited by frankenstein
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  • 2 weeks later...

I have two ideas on this ...

1) For long term storage, the LDS canneries are a great, inexpesive place to start. They include basic items such as wheat, potato flakes and more.

2) If you are looking for something, not so basic, check out Honeyville Farms Online. I dont know if anybody less expensive than they are. Further, if you are still looking for something even more simple, check out Wise Foods. I did a couple of videos demonstrating their products a while back, here is one of the links on YouTube.

As far as shelving, I think the Shelf Reliance shelves seem a little over kill to me, and they arent very efficient as far as space. Thats just my personal opinion. The best deals on these shelves are NOT from the corporate office in Pleasant Grove, but at home shows or other food centers line Costco.

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