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Who are the "children" in Alma 46:12?


Nathair/|\

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I am attempting to translate the Title of Liberty into Irish (Gaeilge) and I ran into a snag. I am not sure whether to use clann or paisti for children. Does anyone know whether "children" in the passage refers to the small children of a household/family or to the greater family that a sheik or clan chief would be responsible for?

Here is my present translation:

I meabhair de ar Dia, ar creideamh agus saoirse; ar siochain ar mna cheile agus ar paisti.

(Does anyone know how to put a foda over a letter on here?)

Yours under the confused oaks,

Nathair /|\

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A second question I have for the larger project of translating the Book of Mormon into Irish (I am hoping it will help me become more familiar with the Book of Mormon and the Irish tongue) is if I should transform the names into Irish forms using the standard pronunciation or since we don't know how the Nephites pronounced the names if I should maintain the current spelling and let the pronunciation fall out as it may.

Yours under the learning oaks,

Nathair /|\

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I am attempting to translate the Title of Liberty into Irish (Gaeilge) and I ran into a snag. I am not sure whether to use clann or paisti for children. Does anyone know whether "children" in the passage refers to the small children of a household/family or to the greater family that a sheik or clan chief would be responsible for?

Here is my present translation:

I meabhair de ar Dia, ar creideamh agus saoirse; ar siochain ar mna cheile agus ar paisti.

(Does anyone know how to put a foda over a letter on here?)

Yours under the confused oaks,

Nathair /|\

Well, begorrah begosh and behokey!

Alma 46:12 says:

And it came to pass that he rent his coat; and he took a piece thereof, and wrote upon it

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A second question I have for the larger project of translating the Book of Mormon into Irish (I am hoping it will help me become more familiar with the Book of Mormon and the Irish tongue) is if I should transform the names into Irish forms using the standard pronunciation or since we don't know how the Nephites pronounced the names if I should maintain the current spelling and let the pronunciation fall out as it may.

Yours under the learning oaks,

Nathair /|\

Once again, I'd be inclined to follow what other translations do. The Maori Book of Mormon transliterates "Nephi" as Niwhai, which is roughly the same pronunciation as in English. Had Elder Cowley preserved the vowels and rendered it Newhi, it would have been pronounced "Neffy," which I suspect to be closer to the actual Nephite pronunciation anyway. So I recommend transliterating it into Gaelic phonetic spelling to get as close as you can to the standard pronunciations.

Regards,

Pahoran

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Once again, I'd be inclined to follow what other translations do. The Maori Book of Mormon transliterates "Nephi" as Niwhai, which is roughly the same pronunciation as in English. Had Elder Cowley preserved the vowels and rendered it Newhi, it would have been pronounced "Neffy," which I suspect to be closer to the actual Nephite pronunciation anyway. So I recommend transliterating it into Gaelic phonetic spelling to get as close as you can to the standard pronunciations.

Regards,

Pahoran

In Spanish, it's phonetic by spelling, not clinging to the forced 'standardized' English version.

For example, Nephi is 'Nefi', pronounced, "neh-fee".

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In Spanish, it's phonetic by spelling, not clinging to the forced 'standardized' English version.

For example, Nephi is 'Nefi', pronounced, "neh-fee".

That's interesting. I guess Nathair has a choice, then.

As I mentioned, I'm inclined to suspect that the "Neffy" pronunciation is probably closer to what Nephi was actually called in his lifetime.

I also have a little peeve about the "standardized" English pronunciations. For instance, "Jared" is, according to the published pronunciation guide, supposed to sound like "Jerud."

I understand that; I had missionary companions who pronounced it that way.

They also pronounced "charity" as "cherrdy." But I don't see that in the guide.

Next time they produce such a guide, I'd suggest having it done in Oxford, instead of Salt Lake City.

But then, I'm probably being uncherrdable.

Regards,

Pahoran

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Ceist:

Cen ait a dfhloghaim tu (Nathair) Gailge? (Ta me i mo gnonai i dTra Li i gcontae Chiarrai, so I know some Irish . . .)

Is me ag foglaim. I am taking Gaielge 101 at the University of Montana. I will have to get back to you on the rest.

Yours under the in over my head oaks,

Nathair /|\

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Ok, for now, I am transliterating Nephi as Niaphai with a foda over the first i, Moroni as Moronai with fodas over the "o"s Alma as in English with a foda over the initial a, Mormon as spelled with a foda over the first o.

Yours under the gaelic oaks,

Nathair /|\

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The next project is "when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God."

My translation is

Cathain ta sibhe isteach seirbhis bhur neachi diulach, ta sibh amhain isteach seirbhis bhur nDia.

Yours under the "in every tongue" oaks,

Nathair /|\

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