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Qumran & Mosiah


WalkerW

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I just noticed this. From 11QMelchizedek:

15 This is the day of [peace about which God] spoke [of old through the words of Isa]iah the prophet, who said: Isa 52:7 "How beautiful

16 upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger who announces peace, of the mess[enger of good who announces salvation], saying to Zion: 'your God [reigns']."

17 Its interpetation: The mountains are the pro[phets ...]

18 And the messenger is [the ano]inted of the spirit [mashiach haruach] about whom Dan[iel] spoke ["...until the time of (the/an) Anointed Prince [mashiach nagid] there will be seven weeks . . . after sixty-two weeks, (the/an) Anointed shall be cut off" Dan 9:25, 26 ]. [... and the messenger of]

19 good who announces salv[ation] is the one about whom it is written that [he will send him Isa 61:2-3 "to comfo[rt the afflicted, to watch over the afflicted ones of Zion"].

20 "To comfo[rt the afflicted," its interpretation:] to instruct them in all the ages of the worl[d...]

21 in truth. [...]

22 [...] it has been turned away from Belial and it [...]

23 [...] in the judgments of God, as is written about him: Isa 52:7 "Saying to Zion: 'your God rules'." ["Zi]on" is

24 [the congregation of all the sons of justice, those] who establish the covenant, those who avoid walking [on the pa]th of the people. "Your God" is

25 [Melchizedek, who will fr]ee [them] from the hand of Belial. And as for what he said: Lev 25:9 "You shall blow the hor[n in every] land."

Now Mosiah 15:

11 Behold I say unto you, that whosoever has heard the words of the aprophets, yea, all the holy prophets who have prophesied concerning the coming of the Lord

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I should also point out that Zion is defined as "[the congregation of all the sons of justice, those] who establish the covenant, those who avoid walking [on the pa]th of the people."

This would fit with "whosoever has heard the words of the aprophets, yea, all the holy prophets who have prophesied concerning the coming of the Lord

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Great topic!!

I just stumbled across The Margaret Barker paper, "Who Was Melchizedek and Who Was His God?" Remarkable!

I highly recommend it for those that haven't studied it yet. It changed the way I read the New Testament.

"The Coming of Melchizedek" is one of the keys to her paper. I don't know if this is a paper that she delivered at SBL but it might have been.

http://www.templestudiesgroup.com/Melchizedek_Barker.pdf

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Great topic!!

I just stumbled across The Margaret Barker paper, "Who Was Melchizedek and Who Was His God?" Remarkable!

I highly recommend it for those that haven't studied it yet. It changed the way I read the New Testament.

"The Coming of Melchizedek" is one of the keys to her paper. I don't know if this is a paper that she delivered at SBL but it might have been.

http://www.templestu...edek_Barker.pdf

Barker's paper is fantastic. I read it a while ago. It helped me make many connections I had missed before. Because of that paper, I was able to write this in response to a fundamentalist claiming that we should accept sola scriptura because Jesus and the Apostles quoted scripture:

Paul and others reinterpreted and reapplied Old Testament scriptures to fit the new Christological view. For example, the author of the epistle to the Hebrews quotes Ps. 45:6 and applies it to Christ: "But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom." (Heb. 1::P But the original Psalm was obviously not about Jesus. It was addressed to the anointed Davidic king:

"[T]he rituals which transform the status of the earthly king, removing him from "merely human" status to that of a sacral figure, to be couched in the form of a narrative about a god, carries with it the hint that the king himself is to be seen as transformed into a god...The enthronement of the king is thus his apotheosis." (Nicolas Wyatt, "Degrees of Divinity: Some Mythical and Ritual Aspects of West Semitic Kingship," 'There's Such Divinity Doth Hedge a King': Selected Essays of Nicolas Wyatt on Royal Ideology in Ugaritic and Old Testament Literature, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.: 2005)

The king was seen as divine, the son of Yahweh. This is why you have the people prostrated "before Yahweh and the king" in 1 Ch. 29:20 (notice the king sits on the throne of Yahweh in vs. 23). James Davila of the University of St. Andrews has pointed out that Melchizedek was the prototype of Davidic royalty and was originally understood to be a priest, king, and god (or deified king). This, however, was suppressed by the Deuteronomist reformers. Hence, we only have two mentions of Melchizedek in the Hebrew Bible, yet he is a key parallel figure to Jesus in the epistle to the Hebrews. During Christ's timeframe, Melchizedek was viewed as a god or divine mediator in some circles i.e. Fragment 11Q13 (see Davila, "Melchizedek: Priest, King, and God," The Seductiveness of Jewish Myth: Challenge or Response?, ed. S. Daniel Breslauer, SUNY Press: 1997). Ps. 45:6 describes the Israelite king, who is anointed or a messiah (Heb "anointed one"), a Davidic descendent, a son of God (see Ps. 2:7), and originally a high priest (see Ps. 110:4). All these apply to the Messiah who is Jesus. So, we see a reworking of Old Testament scriptures to fit the revelation of Christ's resurrection (even resurrection had cultic significance. See J. Wijngaards, "Death and Resurrection in Covenantal Context (Hos. VI 2)," Vetus Testamentum 17:2, April 1967).

James Davila's piece is excellent, by the way.

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WalkerW,

On your recommendation I'm getting Davila's paper through the local library.

I pointed my bible study group to the Barker paper. So far they're ignoring it. It's a touchy topic when one starts showing that early Christians are being given the Melchizedek priesthood and the audience is composed of mostly evangelicals. Tomorrow I'll try again.

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WalkerW,

On your recommendation I'm getting Davila's paper through the local library.

I pointed my bible study group to the Barker paper. So far they're ignoring it. It's a touchy topic when one starts showing that early Christians are being given the Melchizedek priesthood and the audience is composed of mostly evangelicals. Tomorrow I'll try again.

You are an intrepid soul! Good luck! :P

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Great topic!!

I just stumbled across The Margaret Barker paper, "Who Was Melchizedek and Who Was His God?" Remarkable!

I highly recommend it for those that haven't studied it yet. It changed the way I read the New Testament.

"The Coming of Melchizedek" is one of the keys to her paper. I don't know if this is a paper that she delivered at SBL but it might have been.

http://www.templestu...edek_Barker.pdf

A remarkable piece by any measure!! It is to be hoped that we will soon see the republication of Saul Levin, The Father of Joshua/Jesus (Binghamton, N.Y.: SUNY, 1975). Especially chapter 4, which details the ways in which (as Margaret Barker says on p. 11 of her paper), "the plain and precious things . . . have been lost from the Masoretic text of the Old Testament."

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WalkerW,

On your recommendation I'm getting Davila's paper through the local library.

I pointed my bible study group to the Barker paper. So far they're ignoring it. It's a touchy topic when one starts showing that early Christians are being given the Melchizedek priesthood and the audience is composed of mostly evangelicals. Tomorrow I'll try again.

Good Luck again!

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