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Authors That Can Be Trusted Representing Mormonism Truthfully


formerpastor

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

Stay away from the guy you came on here quoting without attribution (and disingenuously, in my book), Ed Decker. :P You're welcome. Glad I could help.

P.S.: Here's another good resource. Happy hunting.

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

Hey formerpastor,

You are making me a former cynic when it come to you. :P I am sure you will get a lot of responses to your question. If I may I would suggest finishing the Book Of Mormon, if you have not already. That would be a big help in understanding all the rest.

Goodluck

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And of course, as you read the Book of Mormon, don't forget to follow the counsel in Moroni 10:3-5.

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And of course, as you read the Book of Mormon, don't forget to follow the counsel in Moroni 10:3-5.

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

One of the problems you will find is that Mormonism has no Systematic Theology. There's not one single author (whether layperson or not) who can tell you everything, and it's likely that everyone has their own views.

I'd recommend this. http://www.amazon.com/Converts-Guide-Mormon-Life-Latter-day/dp/157008520X/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1286669857&sr=8-9

Also, I'll drop you a PM with some ideas.

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Not really 'about' Mormonism, but you might read "Inspiring Experiences that Build Faith" by our Prophet, Thomas S. Monson, it has some nice little stories in it about things he's experienced.

As said, not really about Mormon doctrine rather than experiences, but it's still a good read (some of the stories made me cry).

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Read everything from both sides of the spectrum if you want to be informed, as long as it is authoritative and not just bile masquerading as fact. Just picking those authors that reinforce your belief structure is great for your testimony if that is what you are looking for, but just gives one side of the equations.

I agree Rough Stone Rolling gives a good look at the history of Joseph Smith, and is not so bias one way or the other.

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Anything in the Teachings of Presidents of The Church series (scroll down to "Past Lesson Manuals") would be good, as would Gospel Principles, in the same link.

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Take a look at Jesus the Christ by James E Talmage, an amazing book, but you may or may not need a dictionary close by as you read it...

Also Our Search for Happiness by M Russell Ballard, and A Marvelous Work and a Wonder by LeGrand Richards.

They're all LDS authors, apostles as well, but I found them to be a great source of spiritual knowledge regarding both the Savior and the Restored Church.

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

I would recommend that you read from the Prophets, Seers and Revelators. My I suggest Orson Pratt, Brigham Young, Bruce McConkie and Joseph Fielding Smith as a starting ground. Try the Journal of Discourses as a great place to read the words of these men.

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Not sure if anyone else would agree with me here, but for a non-Mormon point of view, Richard and Joan Ostling have a decent book called Mormon America. I didn't find any untruths in the book and it helped me to get an outsider's frame of reference. It wasn't faith promoting and had some hard stuff in it, but my husband and I thought it was good even though we are LDS. Of course we didn't agree with all the authors options, but they did a good job and were mostly unbiased.

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I would recommend that you read from the Prophets, Seers and Revelators. My I suggest Orson Pratt, Brigham Young, Bruce McConkie and Joseph Fielding Smith as a starting ground. Try the Journal of Discourses as a great place to read the words of these men.

That would be a good way of learning some of the more archaic LDS beliefs, but if you are interested in understanding mormonism today, they wouldn't be extremely useful, though they still have their place.

It would kind of be like reading the writings of Luther to understand the beliefs of present day protestantism, or even Lutheranism. Something would still be the same, but some would not. There would be benefit to reading his words, as long as a person understood them in the context of present-day belief.

The Journal of Discourses is a similar topic-good, enlightening and interesting for understanding the whole picture of mormonism, but must be understood in the proper context.

John knows the limited relevance these books would have for your purposes, but being a critic of the LDS church, and knowing that some of the men he spoke of have held some interesting or disagreeable beliefs, he has an agenda in recommending them.

Not that that's bad-we all have agendas with certain topics. It's just important to be aware of the agenda's existence.

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I'm a big fan of the old missionary journals available on the BYU sites. You can't learn Mormonism with a hands off approach so if you are just bent to reading then you might as well read about real experiences.

Of course I think the quickest way to get an unbiased, non-trivial and truthful reprensentation of Mormondom is to participate as much as possible for some time while incorporating a small amount of scripture study and prayer into your life.

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Hi,

I have taken the recommendation of some forum members and am reading Gospel Principles, subscribed to Ensign magazine, and am reading of course the Book of Mormon. When I look for books to put on my Kindle there are many on Mormonism. Some obviously anti-Mormon, and others written by men of the last century. Can you give me some ideas on who to read and maybe who to stay away from as I learn about the Mormon faith and history? Thank you.

1. The Articles of Faith by James Talmage

2. The Great Apostasy by James Talmage

3. Jesus the Christ by James Talmage

4. History of the Church (a volume set).

5. All of Hugh Nibley's works

6. The Infinite Atonement by Tad Mcallister

Browse here Deseret Book for some good books.

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Orson Scott Card's short story collection, Keeper of Dreams, includes some very well written and, I assume accurate, depictions of Utah Mormon culture. (I can't vouch for their accuracy since I left Utah when I was two after my parents graduated from BYU; but he grew up in Utah and is a faithful member of the Church) I'm especially fond of "Christmas at Helaman's House" since it reminds me so much of my Grandfather.

Yours under the literary oaks,

Nathair /|\

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That would be a good way of learning some of the more archaic LDS beliefs, but if you are interested in understanding mormonism today, they wouldn't be extremely useful, though they still have their place.

It would kind of be like reading the writings of Luther to understand the beliefs of present day protestantism, or even Lutheranism. Something would still be the same, but some would not. There would be benefit to reading his words, as long as a person understood them in the context of present-day belief.

The Journal of Discourses is a similar topic-good, enlightening and interesting for understanding the whole picture of mormonism, but must be understood in the proper context.

John knows the limited relevance these books would have for your purposes, but being a critic of the LDS church, and knowing that some of the men he spoke of have held some interesting or disagreeable beliefs, he has an agenda in recommending them.

Not that that's bad-we all have agendas with certain topics. It's just important to be aware of the agenda's existence.

Given the principle of the "restoration" I am not sure how you can label doctrines of this dispensation to be archaic. Care to elaborate?

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Given the principle of the "restoration" I am not sure how you can label doctrines of this dispensation to be archaic. Care to elaborate?

I suppose by arcaic i meant that some of the teachings in those books were teachings and beliefs that belong to the early years of the church and are not relevant today.

I admit that i have no idea how the principle of the restoration has anything to do with whether or not the church can validly have teachings or beliefs in its past that aren't considered correct today so i guess you'll have to explain where your confusion on that comes from. Especially when the teachings or beliefs in question were never considered actual church doctrine (at least, not that i'm aware of).

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